President Trump

Re: President Trump

Postby Burleysway on Thu 18 Apr 2019, 3:28 pm

Trump Russia investigation: Attorney General Barr backs Trump

The US Attorney General has defended President Trump over allegations of obstruction of justice, while reiterating that "no collusion" was found between his team and Russia.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-47981614
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Burleysway

Re: President Trump

Postby Brevet Cable on Thu 18 Apr 2019, 4:05 pm

They're still trying to screw him over, though, the sad losers that they are.

Maybe he should start an illegal war or fund terrorists, it seemed to work for previous incumbents.
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Re: President Trump

Postby Spiny Norman on Thu 18 Apr 2019, 7:38 pm

If Trump had done nothing wrong, and so had nothing to be afraid of, why did he fire the head of the FBI and want the special counsel, Robert Mueller fired?
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Re: President Trump

Postby CJS on Thu 18 Apr 2019, 8:27 pm

Is it because he's a massive orange bellend?

Or is that just a coincidence?
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Re: President Trump

Postby Brevet Cable on Thu 18 Apr 2019, 9:12 pm

Because he wasn't - and still isn't - a politician.
Which means that unlike previous incumbents he didn't have a ready-made team of sycophants ( err, sorry, I mean professionals ) to bring with him.
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Re: President Trump

Postby CJS on Thu 18 Apr 2019, 9:27 pm

He is still a massive orange bellend though.
"Forewarned is forearmed"
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Re: President Trump

Postby Brevet Cable on Thu 18 Apr 2019, 11:44 pm

That goes without saying.
He talks bollocks too. :lol:
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Re: President Trump

Postby Homer on Fri 19 Apr 2019, 6:26 am

Spiny Norman wrote:If Trump had done nothing wrong, and so had nothing to be afraid of, why did he fire the head of the FBI and want the special counsel, Robert Mueller fired?


Because he knows he doesn't know right from wrong so doesn't know if he has done anything wrong.
Homer

Re: President Trump

Postby Brevet Cable on Tue 23 Apr 2019, 8:30 am

Trump's coming to Britain again, then.
And before anyone asks, it'll be in June.....so he won't be doing RIAT :lol:
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Re: President Trump

Postby Burleysway on Tue 23 Apr 2019, 10:14 am

Brevet Cable wrote:Trump's coming to Britain again, then.
And before anyone asks, it'll be in June.....so he won't be doing RIAT :lol:



Hopefully he will be treated with a bit more respect this time by the great British public.
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Burleysway

Re: President Trump

Postby Brevet Cable on Tue 23 Apr 2019, 10:35 am

Unfortunately, probably not.
They tend to save their praise for POTUS who start illegal wars, foment insurgency & fund/aid terrorists.
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Re: President Trump

Postby DerekF on Tue 23 Apr 2019, 11:31 am

Burleysway wrote:
Brevet Cable wrote:Trump's coming to Britain again, then.
And before anyone asks, it'll be in June.....so he won't be doing RIAT :lol:



Hopefully he will be treated with a bit more respect this time by the great British public.


I hope he will be treated with the respect he deserves. :smile:
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Re: President Trump

Postby CJS on Tue 23 Apr 2019, 11:33 am

Burleysway wrote:
Brevet Cable wrote:Trump's coming to Britain again, then.
And before anyone asks, it'll be in June.....so he won't be doing RIAT :lol:



Hopefully he will be treated with a bit more respect this time by the great British public.


Hopefully he won't be.

Brevet Cable wrote:Unfortunately, probably not.
They tend to save their praise for POTUS who start illegal wars, foment insurgency & fund/aid terrorists.


What, as opposed to ones who separate kids from their families, try to build walls between countries (cos that alwaysworks out well, refer to Haiti, El Salvador and various African states as S***hole countries, say things like “I don’t even wait. And when you’re a star, they let you do it, you can do anything… grab them by the p****” and call former female aides 'dogs' you mean?

:roll:
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CJS

Re: President Trump

Postby Brevet Cable on Tue 23 Apr 2019, 12:43 pm

Why not build walls....it's traditional.
The Romans did it to keep the Celts out ( didn't work )
The English did it - and dug ditches - to keep the Celts out ( didn't work )
The Chinese did it to keep the Mongols out ( didn't work )
So why shouldn't Trump build a wall - downgraded to a fence - to keep the South Americans out?
After all, building a wall & being tough on illegal immigrants was part of his campaign promises & the voters elected him to do that.
And don't forget, with the exception of the wall - because we've got a sea - his treatment of illegal immigrants is no different to what the UK have done....and there are plenty of people here who'd like to see them treated much harsher.

As for being a misoginistic groper, he's not exactly the first POTUS to be guilty of that and the voters knew what he's like but still voted for him.
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Re: President Trump

Postby Burleysway on Tue 23 Apr 2019, 1:06 pm

Brevet Cable wrote:Why not build walls....it's traditional.
The Romans did it to keep the Celts out ( didn't work )
The English did it - and dug ditches - to keep the Celts out ( didn't work )
The Chinese did it to keep the Mongols out ( didn't work )
So why shouldn't Trump build a wall - downgraded to a fence - to keep the South Americans out?
After all, building a wall & being tough on illegal immigrants was part of his campaign promises & the voters elected him to do that.
And don't forget, with the exception of the wall - because we've got a sea - his treatment of illegal immigrants is no different to what the UK have done....and there are plenty of people here who'd like to see them treated much harsher.

As for being a misoginistic groper, he's not exactly the first POTUS to be guilty of that and the voters knew what he's like but still voted for him.


Some fair points stated there BC :up:
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Burleysway

Re: President Trump

Postby CJS on Tue 23 Apr 2019, 2:47 pm

Burleysway wrote:
Brevet Cable wrote:Why not build walls....it's traditional.
The Romans did it to keep the Celts out ( didn't work )
The English did it - and dug ditches - to keep the Celts out ( didn't work )
The Chinese did it to keep the Mongols out ( didn't work )
So why shouldn't Trump build a wall - downgraded to a fence - to keep the South Americans out?
After all, building a wall & being tough on illegal immigrants was part of his campaign promises & the voters elected him to do that.
And don't forget, with the exception of the wall - because we've got a sea - his treatment of illegal immigrants is no different to what the UK have done....and there are plenty of people here who'd like to see them treated much harsher.

As for being a misoginistic groper, he's not exactly the first POTUS to be guilty of that and the voters knew what he's like but still voted for him.


Some fair points stated there BC :up:


Fair enough, I suppose.

But he's still an orange arse who I'd rather didn't grace our little island unless he really has to.
"Forewarned is forearmed"
How do you know I didn't?
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CJS

Re: President Trump

Postby Brevet Cable on Tue 23 Apr 2019, 3:28 pm

He has to...Brenda's invited him.
After all, he is, for all his faults, POTUS.
Not forgetting he's less controversial than some other national leaders who've visited here in the past
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Re: President Trump

Postby Burleysway on Fri 26 Apr 2019, 7:14 pm

Interesting article I’ve read online tonight in the Telegraph and I feel compelled to post it. It’s in the subscribe only section so I’ve C&P it.

The deluded vanity of our political class is plumbing new depths. Self-righteous virtue-signalling has replaced practical action in large parts of the Westminster establishment. Having miserably failed to implement the result of the 2016 EU referendum, too many MPs, especially on the left, now pompously declare that they will snub the state visit in early June of Donald Trump, the democratically elected President of our closest ally.

Their shameful behaviour is another milestone in the infantilisation of British civic life, where personal feelings and invented grievances count for more than our nation’s genuine needs. It is telling that, in the very week of the Trump rejection, so many of our senior politicians could be found pathetically fawning over Greta Thunberg, the unelected, unaccountable 16-year-old Swedish teenager who has become the global representative of the eco-doomsday cult.

Leading the way in this orgy of self-regard is the Speaker John Bercow, who has announced that he will boycott the Royal Banquet for Trump at Buckingham Palace. As the holder of his ancient constitutional office, Bercow is meant to be impartial, but here he is, acting out a progressive fever dream.

Even more hypocritical is Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn who says that he will not attend the Royal dinner because of Trump’s “climate change denial” and indulgence in “racist and misogynistic rhetoric.” Corbyn’s double standards are breathtaking.

A Marxist revolutionary who, throughout his career, has been happy to associate with violent extremists and terror groups, Corbyn once called Hezbollah his “friends” and in 1987 even stood for a minute’s silence in tribute to IRA operatives killed in a daring ambush by the SAS. Yet this radical ideologue and apologist for assassins has the gall to say that he finds Donald Trump beyond the pale.

It is a mark of Britain’s decline that Corbyn could soon be our Prime Minister. But then the whole anti-Trump circus is shameful. The real damage will be done to our country, not the US President. America, by far the world’s most powerful democracy, is vital not only to our national security but also to our economy. It is idiotic to treat Trump with such childish disrespect when his administration will be central to the development of a new transatlantic trade deal, if Brexit ever happens.

And the snub is wrong-headed on so many other levels. Trump, whose deep affection for Britain stems in part from having a Scottish mother, is coming here to take part in the 75th anniversary commemoration of D-Day, a monument to Anglo-American military endeavour. To throw an attention-seeking tantrum over Trump is to insult the legacy of the heroes who helped to save Europe from Nazi tyranny more than seventy years ago.

Historically, the White House has achieved far more in the fight against racism than Corbyn has ever done. Indeed, while he mouths off sanctimoniously against Trump, Corbyn is embroiled in serious allegations that his leadership has presided over relentless anti-Semitism within Labour’s ranks.

The Left’s frothing indignation against Trump has neither balance nor credibility. What is the terrible thing he is supposed to have done? What is the evil he has committed that justifies all this hysterical rage? Trump is far less of a war-monger and foreign interventionist than any of his recent predecessors in the White House, devoid of destructive fantasies about regime change.

If Obama had achieved détente with North Korea like Trump has, he would probably have been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Moreover, Trump is nothing like stooge of Putin that his enemies pretend, as shown by the recent report by special counsel Robert Mueller, who concluded, much to the dismay of the Left, that there was no collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 Presidential election.

Contrary to all the grim forecasts, Trump has also presided over a booming American economy, driven by his tax cuts and trade negotiations. Only yesterday, it was announced that US growth reached a bumper annual rate of 3.2 per cent. Unemployment among African Americans, Corbyn might note, is at a record low.

But Corbyn will not care about such facts. Like the rest of his ilk, he just wants to wallow in his juvenile, ingrained anti-Americanism. At heart, adolescent rebellion remains his favourite brand of politics. Sadly, his insulting approach now appears to be contagious.
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Burleysway

Re: President Trump

Postby Tommy on Fri 26 Apr 2019, 8:41 pm

To me, people are free to like or dislike Trump as they please, however, I find that article completely uncompellable. Who wrote it? Almost guaranteed to have been written by an old privileged white man. You could practically play "rich white man crying into safe-space column inches" bingo with it.

I mean, I'm no professional journalist, and to me these things are produced by knowledgeable hardline writers with oodles of experience and an editorial team to make these kinds of things watertight, but the holes even I, with my absolute turd-salad of a brain can pick in it are quite considerable.

Burleysway wrote: It is telling that, in the very week of the Trump rejection, so many of our senior politicians could be found pathetically fawning over Greta Thunberg, the unelected, unaccountable 16-year-old Swedish teenager who has become the global representative of the eco-doomsday cult.


"telling" of what, I wonder? We didn't elect Greta Thunberg, true, but nor did we elect Trump. "16-year old teenager" - smashing tautology, though. Top journalism.

Burleysway wrote:Even more hypocritical is Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn who says that he will not attend the Royal dinner because of Trump’s “climate change denial” and indulgence in “racist and misogynistic rhetoric.” Corbyn’s double standards are breathtaking.

A Marxist revolutionary who, throughout his career, has been happy to associate with violent extremists and terror groups, Corbyn once called Hezbollah his “friends” and in 1987 even stood for a minute’s silence in tribute to IRA operatives killed in a daring ambush by the SAS. Yet this radical ideologue and apologist for assassins has the gall to say that he finds Donald Trump beyond the pale.


Accusing Corbyn of "double-standards" means, quite obviously that he's a hypocrite for meeting with all those bad people, but not with Trump. That might be a fair point, but it is a point which equates Trump in the same category of those bad people, which seems, again, to be a self-defeating argument, given the spirit of the article.

Burleysway wrote:It is a mark of Britain’s decline that Corbyn could soon be our Prime Minister. But then the whole anti-Trump circus is shameful. The real damage will be done to our country, not the US President. America, by far the world’s most powerful democracy, is vital not only to our national security but also to our economy. It is idiotic to treat Trump with such childish disrespect when his administration will be central to the development of a new transatlantic trade deal, if Brexit ever happens.

And the snub is wrong-headed on so many other levels. Trump, whose deep affection for Britain stems in part from having a Scottish mother, is coming here to take part in the 75th anniversary commemoration of D-Day, a monument to Anglo-American military endeavour. To throw an attention-seeking tantrum over Trump is to insult the legacy of the heroes who helped to save Europe from Nazi tyranny more than seventy years ago.


Amazing. So the article laments Britain's "decline" due to Corbyn, but also acknowledges that we have declined to the point that we must appease and approve of whomever holds the office of president of the USA because we need them so much.

Burleysway wrote:Historically, the White House has achieved far more in the fight against racism than Corbyn has ever done.


Presumably, that's because Corbyn hasn't actually had the office of power yet.

Burleysway wrote:Indeed, while he mouths off sanctimoniously against Trump, Corbyn is embroiled in serious allegations that his leadership has presided over relentless anti-Semitism within Labour’s ranks.


Standard whataboutery. Corbyn has a massive problem with anti-Semitism that he has handled terribly. But that doesn't make any other issues go away, nor undermine any criticism of them.

Burleysway wrote:What is the terrible thing he is supposed to have done? What is the evil he has committed that justifies all this hysterical rage?


Oh come on. Even Trump doesn't try to deny he said some of the disgusting things he has said.

Burleysway wrote:If Obama had achieved détente with North Korea like Trump has, he would probably have been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Now straying into blind Trump-support and whataboutery again. I haven't found much "frothing left" criticism of Trump's North Korea handling. But, I suppose, what détente has he actually achieved? Two failed summits so far is the last count.

Burleysway wrote:But Corbyn will not care about such facts. Like the rest of his ilk, he just wants to wallow in his juvenile, ingrained anti-Americanism. At heart, adolescent rebellion remains his favourite brand of politics. Sadly, his insulting approach now appears to be contagious.


"ingrained anti-Americanism"? The author was just saying a minute again how Obama wouldn't have received the criticism Trump had. Which is it? Anti-Trump or anti-America?
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Re: President Trump

Postby Tommy on Fri 26 Apr 2019, 8:53 pm

Aside from the above, personally, he doesn't have my welcome to these shores. I think he's a contemptible little "Kris Kris Tofferson!" and I don't welcome him to this country in the same way I don't welcome him into my own house.

We didn't elect him in this country, and even without that, he isn't by default entitled to respect, and especially isn't by default entitled to adoration.

But people who aren't me who do like him are completely free to, I don't know, be glad that he's visiting or something. :dunno:
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Re: President Trump

Postby Flare Path on Fri 26 Apr 2019, 9:38 pm

Burleysway wrote:Interesting article I’ve read online tonight in the Telegraph and I feel compelled to post it. It’s in the subscribe only section so I’ve C&P it.

The deluded vanity of our political class is plumbing new depths. Self-righteous virtue-signalling has replaced practical action in large parts of the Westminster establishment. Having miserably failed to implement the result of the 2016 EU referendum, too many MPs, especially on the left, now pompously declare that they will snub the state visit in early June of Donald Trump, the democratically elected President of our closest ally.

Their shameful behaviour is another milestone in the infantilisation of British civic life, where personal feelings and invented grievances count for more than our nation’s genuine needs. It is telling that, in the very week of the Trump rejection, so many of our senior politicians could be found pathetically fawning over Greta Thunberg, the unelected, unaccountable 16-year-old Swedish teenager who has become the global representative of the eco-doomsday cult.

Leading the way in this orgy of self-regard is the Speaker John Bercow, who has announced that he will boycott the Royal Banquet for Trump at Buckingham Palace. As the holder of his ancient constitutional office, Bercow is meant to be impartial, but here he is, acting out a progressive fever dream.

Even more hypocritical is Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn who says that he will not attend the Royal dinner because of Trump’s “climate change denial” and indulgence in “racist and misogynistic rhetoric.” Corbyn’s double standards are breathtaking.

A Marxist revolutionary who, throughout his career, has been happy to associate with violent extremists and terror groups, Corbyn once called Hezbollah his “friends” and in 1987 even stood for a minute’s silence in tribute to IRA operatives killed in a daring ambush by the SAS. Yet this radical ideologue and apologist for assassins has the gall to say that he finds Donald Trump beyond the pale.

It is a mark of Britain’s decline that Corbyn could soon be our Prime Minister. But then the whole anti-Trump circus is shameful. The real damage will be done to our country, not the US President. America, by far the world’s most powerful democracy, is vital not only to our national security but also to our economy. It is idiotic to treat Trump with such childish disrespect when his administration will be central to the development of a new transatlantic trade deal, if Brexit ever happens.

And the snub is wrong-headed on so many other levels. Trump, whose deep affection for Britain stems in part from having a Scottish mother, is coming here to take part in the 75th anniversary commemoration of D-Day, a monument to Anglo-American military endeavour. To throw an attention-seeking tantrum over Trump is to insult the legacy of the heroes who helped to save Europe from Nazi tyranny more than seventy years ago.

Historically, the White House has achieved far more in the fight against racism than Corbyn has ever done. Indeed, while he mouths off sanctimoniously against Trump, Corbyn is embroiled in serious allegations that his leadership has presided over relentless anti-Semitism within Labour’s ranks.

The Left’s frothing indignation against Trump has neither balance nor credibility. What is the terrible thing he is supposed to have done? What is the evil he has committed that justifies all this hysterical rage? Trump is far less of a war-monger and foreign interventionist than any of his recent predecessors in the White House, devoid of destructive fantasies about regime change.

If Obama had achieved détente with North Korea like Trump has, he would probably have been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Moreover, Trump is nothing like stooge of Putin that his enemies pretend, as shown by the recent report by special counsel Robert Mueller, who concluded, much to the dismay of the Left, that there was no collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 Presidential election.

Contrary to all the grim forecasts, Trump has also presided over a booming American economy, driven by his tax cuts and trade negotiations. Only yesterday, it was announced that US growth reached a bumper annual rate of 3.2 per cent. Unemployment among African Americans, Corbyn might note, is at a record low.

But Corbyn will not care about such facts. Like the rest of his ilk, he just wants to wallow in his juvenile, ingrained anti-Americanism. At heart, adolescent rebellion remains his favourite brand of politics. Sadly, his insulting approach now appears to be contagious.


Good post. :up:
Flare Path

Re: President Trump

Postby Paul_Reflex on Sat 27 Apr 2019, 6:47 am

Aside from the excellent points Tommy makes about this quite terrible piece, I would also make two other observations.

Firstly, if the author thinks that Trump is not fixated on regime change then they have obviously failed to observe that he picked John Bolton and Mike Pompeo to be his most senior cabinet members for foreign policy. These people are actively working for regime change in Venezuela and would like nothing more than to go to war with Iran. These two people are proper neo-con hawks, no doubt about that at all.

Secondly, the author says that the Mueller report clears Trump of 'collusion' with Russia in the 2016 election. It says no such thing. The evidence about these matters contained in the report is horrifying. Let's not forget that the Judge in General Flynn's trial, who saw much more of the evidence than we have seen, asked the prosecutors why he was not charged with treason. There was active cooperation with representatives of Russian intelligence services through many go betweens that, in the case of Trump alone, did not pass the threshold for criminal conspiracy.

This president is a bad actor and is only concerned with promoting himself and his business. It isn't America first, its Trump first always.
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Paul_Reflex

Re: President Trump

Postby Burleysway on Sat 27 Apr 2019, 7:18 am

Here's something else to mull over. Via Telegraph

Dictators, despots and despicable groups: How Corbyn has broken bread with far more controversial figures than President Trump.

Jeremy Corbyn once wrote that he enjoyed “a takeaway dinner”with Hamas chief Khaled Mahal - and yet he is unwilling to dine with the Queen and President Trump at Buckingham Palace.
His decision to snub a state banquet with the so-called leader of the free world is undoubtedly designed to kowtow to his anti-Trump Corbynista fanbase as much as a reflection of his virulent opposition to US foreign policy. Arguing it would be wrong to "roll out the red carpet" for the US president, whom he accused of using "racist and misogynist rhetoric", the Labour leader said the US-UK relationship did not need "the pomp and ceremony" of June's state visit.

Yet the virtue-signalling boycott appears even more politically cynical in light of Corbyn’s willingness to meet a string of controversial figures in the past.
He happily donned white tie to attend a state banquet in honour of Chinese President Xi Jinping shortly after becoming Labour leader in 2015 - despite concerns about the Communist country’s human rights abuses. And in 2009, he accepted a free trip funded by controversial Palestinian lobbyists to meet President Assad in Syria. Corbyn responded to the trip by writing in The Morning Star that he had been exposed to evidence that ‘the Israeli tail wags the US dog’.

In another journalistic foray in the left-wing newspaper, the avowed socialist boasted of his “long meeting” with Mashal in 2010. A Labour spokesman was later unable to explain how Corbyn had met the Hamas chief in the bombed out wreck of Gaza’ parliament building when Mashal was still in exile from the city - and did not return until 2012.
It was not the first time the veteran MP for Islington North appeared on the wrong side of foreign affairs. Twelve days after the Brighton bombing, Corbyn invited two convicted IRA terrorists, Linda Quigley and Gerard McLoughlin to the Commons. The 1984 attempt to assassinate Margaret Thatcher killed five people and injured dozens more. Odd then, that Corbyn should have found the presence of his former Labour colleague Chuka Umunna at a recent Brexit meeting so offensive, he stormed out, having initially refused to engage with Theresa May either.

Having described Hamas and Hezbollah as ‘friends’, Corbyn appeared much more willing to meet leaders of both groups than the Change UK MP, despite them being proscribed as terrorist organisations by the US Department of State. In a speech to the Stop the War Coalition in 2009, he declared: “It will be my pleasure and my honour to host an event in parliament where our friends from Hezbollah will be speaking…I’ve also invited friends from Hamas”.

Another ‘friend’ is Russian president Vladimir Putin, who Corbyn has chosen to defend on a number of occasions, including after the Salisbury poisoning.
In March last year, he appeared to misjudge the public mood by calling for Russia to take a test sample of the chemicals found in the cathedral city “to reveal the identity of its perpetrators”.

It came after he defended Putin’s actions in Ukraine, saying his “crime is to dare resist this US Empire, taking a stand against the hypocrisy, double standards, and complete lack of respect for other countries, cultures, and values it represents.”
And let’s not forget that Corbyn has also happily sat down in front of the camera for a series of interviews for the state owned Iranian broadcaster Press TV, earning £20,000 in the process. The channel has been banned by Ofcom and regularly hosts Holocaust deniers. They were fined £100,000 in 2011 after conducting an interview with an imprisoned Newsweek journalist that was under duress.

And of course there was that celebratory phonecall to Venezuelan dictator Nicolas Maduro when he took power in 2014, which came after Corbyn had written his predecessor Hugo Chavez a warm obituary in 2013 and followed praise for Cuban leader Fidel Castro’s “achievements”, describing him as a “champion of social justice”,.
Appearing once again to have been on the wrong side of Anglo-American relations following 9/11, Corbyn said: “What goes around comes around”. Then, in 2015 he described the assassination of Osama bin Laden as a ‘tragedy’ comparable to the attack on the Twin Towers. With views like this, perhaps it will be Trump thanking his lucky stars that he won’t be breaking bread with the leader of Her Majesty’s Opposition.
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Burleysway

Re: President Trump

Postby Paul_Reflex on Sat 27 Apr 2019, 7:55 am

And who can forget that time when Vince Cable was caught at a vicars and tarts party with Pol Pot, Idi Amin and Piers Morgan.
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Paul_Reflex

Re: President Trump

Postby FarnboroJohn on Sat 27 Apr 2019, 8:07 am

You cannot improve Trumps image by pointing out Corbyn's misdemeanours, or indeed anyone else's.

Can you improve Trump's image by pointing out anything he has done? That is, discounting being able to fool all of the people some of the time, and some of the people all of the time, which as Spike Milligan said "is just long enough to be President of the United States".
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