Hints of dealing with night time flare

Hints of dealing with night time flare

Postby aknott68 on Wed 01 Nov 2017, 10:40 am

I'm hoping someone might be able to tell me hat I'm doing wrong.

For the second time in a week I went to a night time shoot, the first time was at Cosford and I took the D500 with a "kit" lens and go flare all over the place, which I was putting down to the lens.

However last Saturday I was at Wellesbourne with the D810 and the 24-70mm/2.8 lens and I still go horrible flare - as shown in this image https://www.flickr.com/photos/135031135 ... ateposted/

Now I know that there isn't any significant dust or rubbish on the lens/sensor, so can someone suggest what might cause this and more impolrtantly how to constrain it occurring again in the future. I even had the lens hood on to try and reduce any side flare from the lights on the plane, could this be causing the issue?

Any help would be much appreciated.
aknott68

Re: HInts of dealing with night time flare

Postby Pen Pusher on Wed 01 Nov 2017, 11:13 am

Was there a UV filter, or any other filter on the front of the lens.?

Brian
The Future Of Photography Is Mirrorless

DUXFORDfotoGALLERY
Facebook
User avatar
Pen Pusher

Re: HInts of dealing with night time flare

Postby aknott68 on Wed 01 Nov 2017, 11:41 am

Yes brian lens protected by low profile uv filter do you suspect an issue between the back of the filter and the front of the lens leading to the defraction?
aknott68

Re: HInts of dealing with night time flare

Postby Pen Pusher on Wed 01 Nov 2017, 11:53 am

When I first started doing night shoots I read up a lot on 'how to' on-line and quite a few web sites and blogs suggested NOT having any filters of any sort on the front of the lens.

From a quick Google.
4. Avoid using filters to minimize lens flare

Using polarizing filter or ND filter might be a regular practice for those of you who click landscapes or cityscapes. As we discussed above, more elements means more chances of capturing lens flare in the photo.

You should always remove UV filter while clicking photos, as it hardly has any use apart from protecting the front element of the lens. By using the UV filter you are adding on a glass element and thus making the camera sensor prone to lens flare.

Polorizing filter and ND filter help you control the exposure of the scene, thus if the really feel the need of these filters then only mount them on the lens. If you can manage a photo without using these filters, it would help you minimize the chances of capturing lens flare.


Brian
The Future Of Photography Is Mirrorless

DUXFORDfotoGALLERY
Facebook
User avatar
Pen Pusher

Re: HInts of dealing with night time flare

Postby aknott68 on Wed 01 Nov 2017, 12:00 pm

Thanks for the advice brian I shall try with the filter removed with the d810 on next night shoot with the same lens and see if this improves the situation.

Cheers
aknott68

Re: HInts of dealing with night time flare

Postby vulcan558 on Wed 01 Nov 2017, 7:43 pm

Brians nailed the issue. Forget filters.
vulcan558

Re: HInts of dealing with night time flare

Postby Paul_Reflex on Wed 01 Nov 2017, 8:21 pm

Not using a filter would help, but a certain amount of flare would be expected pointing a lens with several glass elements (particularly a zoom lens) at a powerful light source as in the Vulcan example. I'm not sure you'll ever eliminate that entirely.
User avatar
Paul_Reflex

Re: Hints of dealing with night time flare

Postby wallace on Thu 02 Nov 2017, 5:55 am

Your picture has disappeared, so no comment on that.

Sometimes one can use flare for effect, sometimes it works, most it is a right pain.

As for filters - UV filters were ONLY any good in the days of film photography. Digital cameras have a filter over the sensor, inside the camera to cut out unwanted parts of the light spectrum. Camera lens manufacturers spend an absolute fortune on developing coatings for lenses, so the addition of a UV Filter is unnecessary.
As for protecting the front element of a lens, that's open to debate but if it is image quality you are after - take the thing off and bin it.

The other tip is to use a lens hood when shooting into the light and avoid if you can shooting into or having strong light sources in your field of view. You can also use something to shade the front of your lens, reducing the chance of unwanted lens flare.
User avatar
wallace

Re: Hints of dealing with night time flare

Postby phreakf4 on Thu 02 Nov 2017, 9:15 am

Paul-Reflex and Wallace both make good points, but it is worth noting that flare can be just as much a problem in daylight as at night and the most awkward and annoying instance is that caused (in both cases) by a bright light source just outside the field of view of the lens. Even if a good lens hood is fitted light from such a source can fall on the front element causing flare or loss of image contrast or both. The cure for that is indeed to shade the lens from said light source. The general name in photography for such devices is a "French Flag". I usually use a grey card for this purpose (yes, I do still carry one in my camera bag) though it is sometimes necessary to enlist the aid of a friend/helper to hold the card unless one is using a tripod, in which case holders are available.
We are Borg:.....Resistance is Fruity...
User avatar
phreakf4

Re: Hints of dealing with night time flare

Postby Pringles on Thu 02 Nov 2017, 7:16 pm

Thanks for the advice guys, and aknott for raising the subject. I was also at the Wellesbourne shoot and struggled in much the same way - turns out there was a UV filter on there that I'd long since forgotten about that was causing all the trouble :oops: Hopefully the issue is now resolved in time for the LPG shoot at Bruntingthorpe!

Thanks again all!
If life gives you melons then you're probably dyslexic
User avatar
Pringles

Re: Hints of dealing with night time flare

Postby Big_Gareth on Fri 03 Nov 2017, 12:48 am

I binned my UV filters a long time ago and haven't looked back. When spending lots of cash on a piece of glass the last thing you want to be doing is shooting through a twenty quid piece of plastic.

Having said that I don't think the UV filter was the problem here. As Paul said above "a certain amount of flare would be expected pointing a lens with several glass elements (particularly a zoom lens) at a powerful light source as in the Vulcan example". I was at the Wellesbourne shoot, using top end glass and no filters; the Vulcan lights were simply too bright and sadly flare ruined lots of my shots. I've not experienced this as much at any of my previous nightshoots and I've done plenty. You won't have the same problem at Brunty for sure because the light source won't be there.
User avatar
Big_Gareth

Re: Hints of dealing with night time flare

Postby jalfrezi on Tue 07 Nov 2017, 4:39 pm

The more pieces of glass there are between the subject and the sensor, then the more likely you are to get lens flare as the light bounces around the glass elements inside the lens.

Also, some lenses are much better than others, the (Canon) 70-300 suffers much more from lens flare than the 24-105 - maybe it's to do with the longer focal length increasing the problem?
User avatar
jalfrezi
UKAR Staff


Return to Photography Hints, Tips & Questions

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: nacl1 and 4 guests