Local light aircraft experience flights

Local light aircraft experience flights

Postby jingernut on Wed 11 Sep 2019, 10:44 am

Hi. Looking to find a local(ish) airfield /club that does local flights just for the experience. Want to take my kids up for a quick flight as they have never been in a plane.

Have done some googling but ultimately takes me to sites for gift vouchers for trial lessons and such like.

Does anyone know an individual or company who would do this local to Oxford area.

Would be great to be able to do a flight that goes over where we live as well.

Thanks for any info.
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jingernut

Re: Local light aircraft experience flights

Postby Jakesplanes on Wed 11 Sep 2019, 12:03 pm

This is an interesting topic. As usual, I favour the DIY method.
Find your nearest flying club or civilian airfield. Go there and ask someone. Guys who fly understand the appeal, and always appreciate petrol money.
To keep your flying insurance valid, all new pilots are required to fly a minimum number of hours a month. New pilots are broke, therefore they will often be happy to take passengers if they know you and trust you. I had a couple of mates who i'd often fly with if i chipped in on gas, and i'd usually share the flying despite firmly occupying the left hand seat, which will also help you out if you ever decide to go for a PPL.
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Jakesplanes

Re: Local light aircraft experience flights

Postby Brevet Cable on Wed 11 Sep 2019, 12:37 pm

Are you ruling out helicopter flights, because there are a companies offering those?
Unofficial forum brauer und winzer
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Brevet Cable

Re: Local light aircraft experience flights

Postby jingernut on Wed 11 Sep 2019, 12:58 pm

Brevet Cable wrote:Are you ruling out helicopter flights, because there are a companies offering those?


Not really, just thought that taking them in a plane would be a better initial flight experience for them. Will have a look at helicopters more if I don't get anywhere.
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jingernut

look at Wingly

Postby tankbuster on Wed 11 Sep 2019, 1:01 pm

lots of choice and it works very well, I have used it successfully three times, https://www.wingly.io/en
Trevor C
recent and not so recent pictures here https://trevorc28a.wixsite.com/trevspics
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tankbuster

Re: Local light aircraft experience flights

Postby Stagger2 on Wed 11 Sep 2019, 3:09 pm

When they were young (9 & 5) I put my kids in fixed-wing & rotary, but the helicopter won the most praise, citing ground-visibility, tipping-action, manoeuvrability & sensation!
Go for the helicopter! :yahoo:
Stagger2

Re: Local light aircraft experience flights

Postby Berf on Wed 11 Sep 2019, 3:18 pm

From the CAA website.

Jakesplanes raises an issue - new broke pilots are nothing new - I flew with them when I was young but now I am older would I put my kids in aircraft with a 'new young pilot' - only you can decide...


Passenger information
What are cost sharing flights?

Cost sharing flights are flights shared by private individuals. The 'cost-shared' part is in reference to the costs of the specific flight which can be shared only between the pilot and others onboard the aircraft. These costs are the 'direct costs' which are the costs directly incurred in relation to a specific flight (e.g. fuel, airfield charges, rental fee for an aircraft). There can be no element of profit for the pilot as these flights are not commercial, and if profit is suspected then the flight might be operating outside of the regulations and therefore be illegal. The pilot must pay a contribution to these direct costs.

The safety and conduct of any flight including cost-shared flights it the responsibility of the pilot in command of the aircraft. The pilot must conduct the flight in accordance with the applicable regulation for non-commercial flights with light aircraft by private pilots. It is also the pilot’s responsibility to ensure the flight is appropriately insured, although passengers may want to check that any personal life, accident and/or health insurance they have is valid for non-commercial flights.

Passengers should be made aware that the pilot may amend or cancel the flight for any reason, including at short notice and that the proportion of the costs must be shared by the pilot. If the flight does not take place, then no remuneration (money or exchange of gifts) should be exchanged between the pilot and passengers.

Passengers are not taking part in a commercial flight but in a leisure flight with a private pilot. The pilot has a duty not to undertake flight if the conditions are not suitable.

Where cost shared flights are arranged through online platforms the CAA recommends the use of only websites that have signed up to the European Aviation Safety Agency “Charter to promote the safety of non-commercial General Aviation flight with light aircraft by flight sharing companies”. Platforms that have signed up to this charter support the provision of appropriate information to both pilots and passengers and helps to ensure that cost-shared flights are conducted within the scope of the regulation.

Safety standards

Commercial aviation in large passenger carrying aircraft has now achieved exceptional safety standards, a standard that would be unachievable by lighter sport, recreational and personal transport aircraft. The safety of non-commercial light aircraft is more comparable to other recreational activities than the much higher standard achieved in commercial aviation.

It is recommended that any promotion of cost-sharing, and conversations with pilots providing flights, should inform you as a potential passenger, of the safety levels of General Aviation flights with light aircraft as compared to those of commercial flying.
The CAA’s UK Aviation Safety Review (CAP1595) provides such comparisons.

Is it legal?

European and national regulation states that pilots are allowed to share flights as long as the aircraft does not carry more than five passengers in addition to the pilot. Furthermore, costs can only be shared, pilots are not allowed to make any profit on the flight. Because cost shared flights remain private, the pilot does not need a commercial pilot’s licence to share the cost with passengers.
If you have concerns over the legality of any flight that have or are going to take place please refer to our webpage for reporting safety concerns: www.caa.co.uk/Our-work/Make-a-report-or ... y-concern/

Pilot information
Flying with strangers opens new potential issues ranging from security and personal safety to insurance implications. To help pilots understand the pros and cons of cost-sharing with strangers we have produced CAP1589, a short guide to the cost sharing regulations.
Ultimately, the clear intention of the cost-sharing rules is to allow pilots to fly more - building skills and experience - while sharing their passion for aviation with others. Providing passengers and pilots understand and stick to the rules, then that intention can become a reality.

European and National regulations permit cost sharing as follows:

The flight is a cost-shared flight by private individuals. Cost sharing flights cannot form part of a business activity through an organisation.
The direct costs of the flight must be shared between all of the occupants of the aircraft, including the pilot, up to a maximum of 6 persons.
The cost-sharing arrangements apply to any other-than complex motor-powered EASA aircraft and this includes aircraft registered outside of the EASA area but operated by an operator established or residing in the Community.
Cost-sharing is also permitted in non-EASA (Annex I of the Basic Regulation (EU) 2018/1139) aircraft registered in the UK.
Direct costs mean the costs directly incurred in relation to a flight (e.g. fuel, airfield charges, rental fee for an aircraft). There can be no element of profit.
Annual costs cannot be included in the cost sharing. These are the cost of keeping, maintaining, insuring and operating the aircraft over a period of one calendar year. There can be no element of profit.

Additional guidance

In the case of a jointly-owned aircraft, the CAA considers the hourly rate, normally payable by a joint owner, for use of their aircraft to be a 'direct cost'.
The above passenger guidance should be made available to any passengers on a cost-shared flight.
Cost shared flights can be advertised, including the use of online 'flight sharing' platforms. Flight sharing platforms that have signed up to the EASA Charter may be a good way to support pilots to ensure their cost-shared flight stays within the scope of the regulation.
It is recommended that any advertising or promotion of cost-sharing flights makes it clear that they are private arrangements and not conducted in accordance with commercial air transport or, where appropriate, public transport rules
Passengers should be made aware that the pilot may amend or cancel the flight for any reason, including at short notice
The proportion of the costs that must be shared by the pilot is not specified in the regulations. However, the pilot must make a contribution to the direct costs of the flight that he is conducting.
The General Exemption (ORS4 No.1274) which permits cost-sharing flights for Annex I aircraft only applies to flights conducted within the London and Scottish Information Regions.
Berf

Re: Local light aircraft experience flights

Postby Occam on Wed 11 Sep 2019, 3:56 pm

Are you thinking of an aircraft big enough to take all of you at once, or would a 2-seater do the job? Bicester Gliding Club is local to you, and does air experience flights in motor gliders.
Occam

Re: Local light aircraft experience flights

Postby Stagger2 on Wed 11 Sep 2019, 6:23 pm

Is there generally such a thing as an Individual/Joint Life Policy that doesn't exclude hazardous activities? I've only ever seen something like the "only flying on a commercial flight as a fare-paying passenger on a scheduled route" caveat in respect of me getting airborne. Often wondered what insurance cover is included for a flight round the block at an air-show for instance. :dunno:
Stagger2

Re: Local light aircraft experience flights

Postby DOUGHNUT on Thu 12 Sep 2019, 10:22 am

Flights at airshows would be considered as "commercial flights" for insurance purposes or as Safety Standards Acknowledgement and Consent (SSAC) if flying in Spitfire or similar.
DOUGHNUT




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