CWGC Cemeteries **updated 14/11/2019**

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 20/08/2019**

Postby SuffolkBlue on Thu 03 Oct 2019, 8:18 pm

I was able to enjoy a month off work before starting a new job recently, which gave me time to visit a number of sites across the country.
I started off with a day visiting locations in Cambridgeshire, Rutland and Northants, with the cemetery in St Neots being the first on the list.

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CWGC St. Neots Cemetery - St. Neots, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Reginald Charles Wilson joined the Bedfordshire Regiment in March 1916. He completed his training and was drafted to France with the Regiment in October 1916. There he took part in heavy fighting on the Somme, Arras and Messines fronts, and was wounded at Ypres in September 1917. He was invalided home, and later was posted to the Royal Air Force, but again went into hospital on account of his wounds, and died on October 28th 1918, after undergoing an operation. He was buried with full military honors here in his home town of St. Neots.
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CWGC St. Neots Cemetery - St. Neots, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 25th November 1940, Handley PageHampden P1320 of 106 Sqn crashed after the pilot lost control during a night-flying training sortie. Sgt Bagnall injured, Sgt E.F. Carthew KIA, Sgt M.C. Mair KIA, Sgt Canham injured.
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CWGC St. Neots Cemetery - St. Neots, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

During the Second World War this cemetery was used for burials from No.6 Polish General Hospital, which was stationed at Diddington, just to the north of the town.
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CWGC St. Neots Cemetery - St. Neots, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC St. Neots Cemetery - St. Neots, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC St. Neots Cemetery - St. Neots, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

It was then a short drive up the A1 to All Saints Churchyard, Wittering. The churchyard mainly contains the graves of casualties who lost their lives either flying from the nearby airfield or the local vicinity. On my visit there were a number of 115 Squadron Grob Tutors buzzing around the area of this famous airfield
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 29th March 1942, the crew of 151 Sqn Boulton Paul DefiantAA384 were on an unauthorised low flying on a training flight when it crashed and caught fire at 12.30hrs after the pilot stalled at low altitude in a steep turn. Pilot P/O HW Hart killed, gunner Sgt AJ Snook were killed.
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 29th July 1955, the crew of Vickers Valiant WP222 left RAF Wittering on a cross-country flight for trials of the Avon engines. Soon after getting airborne, the aircraft entered a left hand descending turn and crashed into the ground. One crew member managed to leave the aircraft but he did not survive. The rest of the crew, including Squadron Leader E R Chalk, were killed in the crash.
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Flight Lt Humphrey William Baggs & Flying Officer Sydney Fleetwood Bell took off from RAF Wittering on the 16th June 1927 in a Sopwith Snipe for a training flight. Not long into the flight, their aircraft spun into the ground at Wothorpe, near Stamford, Lincolnshire, killing both crew members. They are buried here side by side.

The "Portsmouth Evening News", for 17/6/1927, reported that "the aeroplane was flying at a tremendous height when suddenly its engine stopped. It re-started and then the machine fell into a spin, and dropping at a terrific rate, crashed into the ground." Both crew were killed
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Bernard Howe was the son of Frank and Ellen Matilda Howe, born in Melksham, Wiltshire on 10th April 1919. His father was a career soldier with the RAMC, being discharged in 1920 after 26 years of service. Howe went to school at Shirburn, near Watlington, where his mother had, at one time, been lady’s maid for the Countess of Macclesfield. Winning a scholarship to Lord Williams’s Grammar School, he was a pupil there from 1930 to 1937.

In September 1937 he entered RAF College, Cranwell as a Flight Cadet, receiving his commission in July 1939. He then joined 25 Squadron at North Weald in August 1939 and served with the squadron throughout the Battle of Britain flying Blenheim Mark 1f night fighters. Posted in January 1941 to 263 squadron at St Eval, and then Portreath in Cornwall, he flew Westland Whirwind fighters on convoy patrols.

On 6th April 1941, in Whirlwind P7002, he claimed a He111 damaged. On 20th April 1941 on a visit to RAF Wittering, he was killed flying Whirlwind I P6992 which dived into the ground at Burghley House after performing low level inclined rolls. The accident report at the time presumed this was due to a leading edge slat becoming detached.
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

David Francis Roberts, of Penylan, was born in Cardiff in January 1909 and joined the RAF in September 1939 as an Airman u/t Air Gunner. He completed his training and was posted to 25 Squadron, flying Blenheims, in late May 1940 and promoted to Sergeant in June.

He was killed on April 3rd 1941, still serving with 25 Squadron. His Beaufighter X7541 crashed, cause unknown, at Burghley Park near Wittering. The pilot, Sgt. HI Maxwell, was also killed.
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Jack Richard Friend was born in Norwich on 1st April 1914. He was awarded Aero Certificate 19451 at Norfolk & Norwich Aero Club on 10th August 1939. His occupation was recorded as 'bus conductor'. Friend joined the RAF in October 1939 as an Airman u/t Air Gunner. He went to 25 Squadron at North Weald in early October 1940.

In the evening of 7th December 1940 Friend was one of the crew of Blenheim L1235 which was detailed to check the blackout over Peterborough. During the patrol the weather deteriorated and a bad storm developed. The pilot lost control and the aircraft came down near the village of Elton in Huntingdonshire (now Cambridgeshire). Friend and the pilot, F/Lt. J McC M Hughes were both killed and the Radar Operator, Sgt. FB Blenkharn, was seriously injured.
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Bristol Blenheim IF L1459 of No 23 Squadron, RAF Wittering, crashed into the ground from cloud at Fenny Compton, near Leamington Spa, Warwickshire, on the 20th March 1939.
Crew:
Pilot Officer Joseph Benjamin RAVEN (pilot, aged 22) RAF - killed
Pilot Officer Anthony Stewart PETER (observer, aged 22) RAF - killed

Both baled out, but died when their parachutes failed to open.
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Flight Lieutenant Steve Beckley was killed on 6th September 1975 at the Yeovilton Navy Day after his display in the Harrier, when his ejector seat was released.
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Officer David William Thompson of 25 Squadron was killed on the 8th July 1941 whilst flying night fighter patrols protecting the Midlands in a Bristol Beaufighter from RAF Wittering.
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Four Harriers were attacking a target from different directions near Wardle, Nantwich, Cheshire. Two aircraft (XV754 and XV745) failed to maintain separation and collided as they crossed over. Both pilots were killed. Flight Lieutenant John Keith ROBERTS was the pilot of Harrier XV754. Per a contemporary account of the accident from the local press:

"TWO single-seater GR3 Harriers were involved in a peacetime mid-air collision over Wettenhall, Nantwich, which killed both pilots instantly.

The accident happened at around 12.15 pm, on Monday, January 19, 1976. One pilot was found still strapped in his ejector seat. The other had tried to eject, a parachute being found near the Little Man public house at Wettenhall.

The pilots of planes XV 745 and XV 754 were taking part in a four-aeroplane low-level exercise from their base at RAF Wittering, in Cambridgeshire, and were about to clear the low-level area when the accident occurred.

An eye-witness reported to a Nantwich Chronicle reporter shortly afterwards that he had seen “four aircraft flying very low and fast. They peeled off in twos and as they were coming back into formation, one of them seemed to misjudge his timing and a plane from the other pair hit him underneath. There was a great ball of fire in the air followed by a terrific explosion.”

Other eye-witnesses reported that wreckage “came down like confetti” and aircraft parts were spread over a wide area. Several fell near the Little Man and others in the fields of Elms Farm, Calveley. An 11,000-volt power cable was brought down and some homes were without power for three hours.

The two pilots were identified as 29-year-old Flight Lieutenant James Edward Downey and 30-year-old Flight Lieutenant John Keith Roberts.

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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Avro 504N K1042 & K1050, CFS, RAF Wittering: Written off (destroyed) 6/5/32 due to a mid air collision during formation change, near RAF Wittering, Northamptonshire. Machines changing formation, two locked together and fell at moderate speed to the ground.Both pilot (one in each aircraft) were killed:

Flying Officer Duncan Shimwell McDougall (aged 28) killed
Flying Officer Nicholas Erskine White (aged 24) killed

However, it is not clear which pilot was in which aircraft. According to a contemporary newspaper report:

"R.A.F. CRASH.
Two More Officers Killed.

SIXTEEN THIS YEAR. LONDON, Saturday. - Five Royal Air Force planes which were flying in formation at a height of 3,000 feet over Lincolnshire today, were executing a turn when two of them collided. They became interlocked, and crashed to earth and caught fire.

Flying - Officers Duncan Shimwell McDougall and Nicholas Erskine White were killed. This is the tenth fatal R.A.F. crash this year. Sixteen men have been killed in those accidents."
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Officer Ian Hamilton of Hamilton, New Zealand, took off from RAF Wittering in Hawker Hurricane IIb on the 15th July 1942 for a training exercise and after completing a dummy attack on an army column, his aircraft struck trees and crashed.

He has 572 logged hours and completed 105 operational sorties.
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Officer Frank Darycott & Pilot Officer Jacques Horrell were killed along with the rest of their crew when their Douglas Boston AX910 crashed near Molesworth, Northants, on the 13th April 1942.
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Sgt William Arthur Fradley died of natural causes whilst at home in West Worthing, West Sussex.

He was a Wireless Operator / Observer serving with No 25 Sqn based at RAF Wittering

Of note, on the 29 Mar 1941, F/Sgt George Smythe DCM, Pilot and Sgt William Arthur Fradley RAD/OP, were operating in 25 Sqn Bristol Beaufighter I when it overshot the runway at RAF Wittering following a forced landing at approx 2200 hrs due to undercarriage retracted, cockpit canopy iced up & double engine failure

Tragically it collided with a private car that was travelling on the Great North Rd (now the A1) seriously injuring the two occupants, who were brothers. They were both admitted to Stamford Infirmary with severe head wounds. Despite best efforts of medical staff they both died in the early hours of the following morning, 30th March 1941

F/Sgt Smythe DCM and Sgt Fradley were reported as being uninjured in this tragic accident, however it is not known if there is/was a link between this and Sgt Fradley's death nine months later
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Leading Aircraftman Roffe lost his life in a collision of two Armstong-Whitworth Whitley aircraft at the Bomber Command training airfield of RAF Llandwrog on the 10th October 1941. During a training exercise Whitley K7252 and Whitley K9041, both from Llandwrog’s 9 Air Gunnery School, were circling the airfield when they collided. K9041, piloted by Flight Lieutenant H.J.B. Martin, was carrying seven passengers: one Sergeant Instructor and six U.T. airmen; K7252, piloted by Squadron Leader H.V. Barker, was carrying eight passengers: one Corporal Instructor, six U.T. airmen and one civilian (from Marshalls Flying School, Limited). All seventeen airmen and one civilian perished in this accident.
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

RNZAF Official
George Leslie Davidson was born at Patea on the 12th May, 1915, and received his secondary education at the New Plymouth Boys High School. He was later a member of the Egmont Wanganui Hunt Club. Prior to his enlistment he was employed on his father's farm at Opaku, Patea. He applied for a Short Service Commission on the 1st April, 1937, but his application was unsuccessful. Shortly after the outbreak of war he applied for aircrew training. He was interested in flying and was a member of the Western Federated Flying Club, New Plymouth, and he logged over 100 hours flying time at the time of his enlistment in the Royal New Zealand Air Force.

Sgt. Davidson was enlisted on the 30th November, 1940, at the Ground Training School, Levin. On the 19th January, 1941, he commenced his flying training at No. 2 Elementary Flying Training School, New Plymouth. On the completion of his elementary flying training in New Zealand he embarked on the 27th March, 1941, on the "Morangi" for Canada to continue his training under the Empire Air Training Scheme. Shortly after arrival in Canada Sgt. Davidson was posted to No. 6 Service Flying Training School, Dunnville, Ontario, where he was awarded his flying badge and promoted to Sergeant on the 3rd July, 1941. He was posted to No. 1 M Depot Debert on the 9th July for embarkation to the United Kingdom.

Sgt. Davidson arrived at No. 3 Personnel Reception Centre Bournemouth, on the 16th August, 1941, and on the 21st of the same month was posted to No. 61 Operational Training Unit, Heston, Middlesex, for operational training in Spitfire, Miles Master aircraft. On the completion of the course early in October, 1941, he proceeded to No. 616 Squadron, Kirton-in-Lindsey, Lincolnshire. With the Squadron at Kirton-in-Lindsey and Kingscliffe, Northamptonshire, he carried out twenty-six operational flights, including convoy and offensive patrols and channel sweeps as a pilot on Spitfire aircraft.

On the 13th April, 1942, Sgt. Davidson was the pilot of a Spitfire aircraft which crashed near Peterborough, Northamptonshire, shortly after taking off from King's Cliffe, Sgt. Davidson losing his life. Sgt. Davidson was buried in the All Saints Churchyard, Wittering, Northamptonshire, with service honours.

The following extract is from the Squadron O.R.B.:

April 13. Twelve Yorkshire Press Photographers and reporters visited the Squadron... and gave the Squadron a marvellous 'write-up' in the press. Sgt G L DAVIDSON (RNZAF) very foolishly tried to 'show off' by rolling at one hundred feet and crashed to his death in a field adjoining the airfield. It was an awkward situation for the press to be there and all personnel were warned not to mention the accident.
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wittering Station Commander Group Captain David Haward left RAF Wittering on the 18th December 1998. His BAe Harrier GR7 ZD434 flew into the ground and exploded near Staindrop, three miles north east of Barnard Castle, County Durham after he lost control during a bomb toss manoeuvre when the aircraft entered cloud. The two other aircraft in the flight circled overhead to identify the site while a 202 Sqn Sea King was scrambled from Leconfield
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Flying Officer John Richard Sewell of 233 Operational Conversion Unit left RAF Wittering on the 28th October 1983 on a sortie to the Holbeach Range, Lincolnshire. After possibly being hit by a ricochet of a shell from the Harrier's own cannon, his aircraft came down and he made no attempt to eject and was killed.
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 16th August 1954, English Electric Canberra B2 WH873 of 76 Squadron crashed at Barnack near Stamford, Lincolnshire. It hit trees bordering Burghley Park, 500 yards from the approach path on night approach to RAF Wittering, Cambridgeshire.

The 3 crew members, including Flight Lieutenant K W Taylor & Flight Lieutenant J K G Marsden, were killed.
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Dominic Page was born in Canterbury on the 6th of February 1922.

On leaving school he enlisted in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve on the 17th July 1940 and commenced pilot training as a Leading Aircraftsman in October 1940. He underwent course at both 13 Elementary Flying Training School at Flying Training School Cranwell and 6 Operational Training Unit before qualifying as a Bristol Blenheim pilot in July 1941. He was commissioned as a Pilot Officer on the 13th April 1941 and underwent a lecture on escape and evasion from Squadron Leader Evans at RAF Andover in June 1941. He was posted to 86 Squadron on the 29th of July 1941 where he flew Bristol Beauforts and underwent a further lecture on escape and evasion at RAF North Coates in September 1941.

On the 24th November 1941 he and his crew took off at 4.15pm from RAF North Coates in Beaufort I BX-H AW207 for a mine laying operation over the Frisian coast between Ameland and Schiermonnikoog with one other aircraft from the squadron. On the run in to lay the mine their aircraft was caught in searchlight beams and was hit by flak from the western most Schiermonnikoog anti aircraft batteries and Page altered course for Schiermonnikoog and the polder land on the south side of the island. The aircraft just missed hitting the farm of De Kooi but crash landed in a "perfect wheels up landing" in a meadow just beyond the farm at 6.15pm. Wreckage was spread over 80 metres with one wing ripped off, both engines lost from their mountings and the mine being thrown clear but failing to explode. The crew were uninjured other than Sergeant McCann who suffered a broken collar bone. The crew set fire to the aircraft before they were captured.

The crew was: -

Pilot Officer Dominic Page (Pilot) (POW No.707)
Flying Officer James "Jimmy" McCrae Paxton (Navigator Stalag Luft 3 POW No.708)
Sergeant J.B. Green (Air Gunner Stalag 383 POW No.73)
Sergeant J. McCann (Stalag 383 POW No.79)

The other aircraft from the squadron, Beaufort Mk 1 BX-T AW192, flown by Pilot Officer Denis Richard James Harper was shot down into the sea near Schiermonnikoog with the loss of the entire crew.

He was taken to Dulag Luft, the main Luftwaffe prisoner transit camp at Oberursel, near Frankfurt am Main, on the 30th November 1941 where he was interrogated and was held until the 15th December 1941 when he was transferred to Stalag Luft I at Barth in Pomerania. He remained there until being transferred again, to Stalag Luft III at Sagan in March 1942. He was involved in one escape attempt during his time in captivity but did not get outside the camp perimeter. With the rapid advance of the Red Army in early 1945 the Germans decided to evacuate the camp and to move the 3,000 prisoners further west. The march west began on the 27th January 1945 and finished on the 4th of February at Malag-Milag Nord prisoner of war camp at Tarmstedt near Bremen. He was released when the camp was liberated in April 1945. While in captivity he was promoted to Flying Officer on the 13th April 1942 and to Flight Lieutenant on the 13th April 1943. He was also a keen member of the camp's theatrical troupe.

At the end of the war he returned to the UK where he resumed his flying career after attending a refresher course flying Airspeed Oxfords at 21 (Pilots) Advanced Flying Unit and completed a Blind Approach Training course at RAF Watchfield from the 9th to the 18th of March 1946 where he was assessed as "Average". In December 1945 he returned to King's to play for the OKS XV against the school, returning again in March 1946 to play hockey for the OKS. He underwent a medical examination on the 22nd May 1946 to assess his suitability to work in photographic reconnaissance. He passed this and was posted to 8 Operational Training Unit to convert to Mosquito aircraft.

On the 19th September 1946 he and his Navigator, Flying Officer Francis Colin Ashworth, were briefed for a cross country photographic reconnaissance sortie to be conducted at 24,000 feet. They were to fly a route from their base at RAF Chalgrove via St Abb's Head - York - Bury St Edmunds and to return to Charlgrove. They were to climb to their operation height and take photographs between Newcastle and St Abb's Head. They were fully briefed on the prevailing weather conditions. He took off from RAF Charlgrove at 2.04pm in de Havilland Mosquito PR34 PF651. At 2.22pm he informed his base that his radio reception was very weak and that he was returning to base. He cancelled this message at 2.38pm as the radio was apparently working satisfactorily again. During this time Francis Ashworth was routinely passing messages to control and at 2.46pm he reported that he was changing frequency to RAF Abington although he did not make contact with them. The aircraft was next heard by witnesses on the ground who heard it when it was above cloud in the area of Wittering and the village of Pilsgate. The engine was heard to be "screaming" and it was thought that the pilot was doing aerobatics. Then an explosion was heard after which the engine noise ceased. The aircraft was then seen just below the top cloud layer at 10,000 feet in a diving attitude and with the starboard wing breaking away. The aircraft then climbed momentarily before immediately entering a slow flat spin to starboard during which both engines broke away from the aircraft while the aircraft was still very high. The aircraft continued to disintegrate until it hit the ground at 2.52pm where it exploded into flames, killing both men instantly. Pieces of wreckage continued to come down for some time after the crash.

A Court of Inquiry was convened into the cause of the accident by the Air Officer Commanding, No. 12 Group on the 23rd of September 1946, at which a number of statements were taken from both experts and from witnesses on the ground.

Statement of Mr. G. Barrett, a former Corporal clerk (D.D) Royal Air Force: -

"On the afternoon of 19th September 1946, I was driving a tractor in Mr. Smalley's farm to the S.E. of Uffington Station. I stopped the tractor and looking up towards the west I saw an aircraft flying at high altitude. I watched it for a moment or so and notice small parts coming from it. I then watched it more intently and noticed that it was deficient of a wing. As it got lower and I was able to get a better view, the aircraft appeared to be climbing, but this was only momentary and the nose dropped. The aircraft then went into a very flat spin and disappeared from my view. The next thing I saw was a cloud of black smoke. I estimate the time from the commencement of the spin to the crash as two minutes. Pieces continued to fall after the aircraft had crashed. I noticed one large piece fall and hit the ground and rushed up to look at it. I found it to be part of a wing. It was covered with ice. I estimate the thickness of the ice to be 1/4"

Three German prisoners of war, who were working nearby, attempted to rescue the two men but were beaten back by the flames. Statement of German POW Ulrich Wolfe: -

"At about 14.55 hrs. (he looked at his watch at that moment) on 19.9.46. I was working in a field about half a mile south east of Pilsgate Grange when my attention was attracted by the roar of an aircraft and a bang to the north west. On looking up I saw it at a height of approximately 3 - 2,000 metres. I noticed a wing was off - I think it was the port one. I could see pieces of the aircraft in its immediate vicinity - they were all small pieces. The aircraft immediately put up its nose and went into a spin - I cannot remember which way. It continued spinning until it went out of view behind some trees. I then saw the smoke from the crash. About half way to the ground the engine on the side with the complete wing came out - I knew it was the engine as I could see the propeller turning. I rushed to the crash and found the fire raging. With the help of two comrades we pulled the occupants out but they were dead. the body of the navigator was wearing an oxygen mask but I did not see any safety straps."

The Court concluded that: -

"The accident was due to loss of control followed by the collapse of the starboard wing. Technical evidence suggests that the wing failed due to overstressing probably caused during the pull-out from the resultant dive. Evidence shows that icing conditions were a contributory cause of the loss of control."

The gallant conduct of the three German prisoners was commended by the coroner and they were recommended for early release. On the 3rd of December 1946, during questions to the Secretary of War in the House of Commons, Mr Anthony Greenwood MP asked the Secretary whether the arrangements for the repatriation of the three men, Ulrich Wolfe, Fritz Oeder and Joseph Schoensteiner, had been made. Mr Bellinger replied, "Yes sir, the conduct of these three prisoners of war has resulted in arrangements being made for their repatriation on the 21st December".
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Sergeant George Joseph Giguere of Thessalon, Ontario, Canada and Sergeant Joseph Marcel Gaston Perron of Rock Forest, Province of Quebec, Canada, took off from RAF Kings Cliffe on the 1st February 1943 on a ferry sortie in Vickers Wellington X3361.

Their aircraft crashed soon after takeoff following loss of power to the starboard engine. It is thought that the engine failure was due to excessive ground running before takeoff

Joseph died of his injuries two days after the crash while in Stamford General Infirmary, Rutland
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 29th July 1955, Vickers Valiant of 138 Squadron crashed, killing all four crew members. The plane could be seen bellowing out smoke as it flew towards Barnack, Cambridgeshire.
Just before the crash a police-constable said he saw the aircraft banking at an angle of 45 degrees and very low. As the plane came towards Mill Farm, Pilsgate the wing tip almost touched the ground. A shopkeeper said he saw the doomed aircraft hit an electric pylon and explode about 200 yards from his house.

The main part of the wreckage ended up in an old disused stone quarry known as the "Hills and Holes" but many other parts were scattered over a wide area. An engine landed in the garden of a music teacher on the edge of the village. Other larger pieces landed in a field about 30 yards from where an 82 year old woman and her daughter-in-law were having a meal.
The four crew members who all died in the crash were, Pilot Squadron Leader E. R. Chalk; second pilot and engineer officer, Flight Lieutenant A. G. Allen; the navigator, Flying Officer T. S. Corkin and the signaller, Flying Officer A. R. Lyons.
Flying Officer Lyons baled out but his parachute failed to deploy.

The four crew members are all buried side by side in Wittering churchyard.
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CWGC Wittering (All Saints) Churchyard - Wittering, Cambridgeshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr
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SuffolkBlue

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 20/08/2019**

Postby SuffolkBlue on Thu 03 Oct 2019, 8:21 pm

Back on the A1 and still heading north, the next stop was St. John the Baptist Church in North Luffenham. This churchyard contains two first world war burials, 18 air force second world war casualties and 11 post-war RCAF burials.

The station was built as a training airfield, opening in 1940. It was later taken over by 5 Group of RAF Bomber Command as a heavy bomber base, and was expanded by the building of concrete runways later in the war. In 1951, the station was transferred to the Royal Canadian Air Force to become the temporary home of 1 Fighter Wing, the first Canadian NATO base in Europe. 1 Wing moved to Marville, France in 1955. In late 1955, No. 228 Operational Conversion Unit, temporarily renamed No. 238 OCU, was detached to North Luffenham from RAF Leeming which was having its runways extended to 7000ft to accommodate Gloster Javelins. The OCU remained for over a year before returning to Leeming.

From 1959 to 1963, North Luffenham was the base for PGM-17 Thor intermediate range ballistic missiles, operated by No. 144 Squadron RAF. In 1997, the airfield was transferred to the British Army and became St George's Barracks.

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CWGC North Luffenham (St. John the Baptist) Churchyard - North Luffenham, Rutland, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC North Luffenham (St. John the Baptist) Churchyard - North Luffenham, Rutland, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC North Luffenham (St. John the Baptist) Churchyard - North Luffenham, Rutland, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Sergeant Kenneth Hughes Long lost his life on the 5th March 1943 in Vickers Wellington BK390 when, on a day time training mission from RAF North Luffenham, his aircraft crashed into a village street at Coates near Whittlesey, Cambridgeshire. The aircraft burst into flames destroying the aircraft and a house, tragically killing four members of the crew and four civilians.
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CWGC North Luffenham (St. John the Baptist) Churchyard - North Luffenham, Rutland, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 12th May 1943, Sergeant John Angus Douglas of Thirroul, New South Wales Australia was flying in Vickers Wellington BK123 from RAF North Luffenham on a training flight. After flying local circuits, the aircraft turned north and crashed near Scunthorpe, North Lincolnshire, killing all on board.
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CWGC North Luffenham (St. John the Baptist) Churchyard - North Luffenham, Rutland, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Flying Officer Arthur Edgar Rayner took off from RAF North Luffenham on the 18th April 1952 in Canadair Sabre II F-86E 19181 when he collided with another RCAF Sabre. Both aircraft came down in The Wash.
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CWGC North Luffenham (St. John the Baptist) Churchyard - North Luffenham, Rutland, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

James Donald Dickson was born on the 29th October 1920 at Hammond River, New Brunswick, Canada. He lived in Rothesay, New Brunswick and enlisted in Moncton on 23rd October 1940. Following training in Canada he arrived in the UK on 16th August 1941, were he trained at 23 OTU before being posted to 57 Squadron on 6th November 1941.

He was commissioned as Pilot Officer with effect from 25th June 1942. Following his service with 57 Squadron he was on strength of 57 OTU and 1659 Conversion Unit. He came near to being court-martialled following an accident on 8th October 1942 when piloting Wellington X3719 which hit a power line near North Luffenham, heavy damage was caused to the aircrafts nose, both propellers and starboard mainplane. He then was posted to 419 Squadron on 14th February until 14th June 1943; Whilst there he ran off runway in Halifax JB859 on returning from operations on 13th May 1943; no blame was attached. He subsequently completed two tours and had flown a total of 53 sorties (323 operational hours). He then was posted to 1659 Heavy Conversion Unit on 14th June 1943 to 29th November 1943.

Following his crash at Thirsk on 14th October 1943, detailed above, he was repatriated to Canada on 3rd December 1943 where upon he went to 5 OTU at Boundary Bay before serving with 164 Squadron. His DFM was effective of 16th June 1942 as per London Gazette dated 22nd September 1942 and was presented at Buckingham Palace on the 30th March 1943. The citation reads.. "Flight Sergeant Dickson has acted as captain of aircraft on numerous occasions. Throughout his tour of duty he has executed his tasks with the utmost vigour and determination. Undeterred by bad weather he makes every effort to locate his target and to bomb it accurately. He has participated in attacks on Brest, Hamburg, Lubeck, Rostock, Essen, Emden, and many equally important targets."

His DFC was effective from 1st September 1943 as per London Gazette dated 14th September 1943, he was presented with the DFC on 2nd November 1946. The citation reads.. "This officer has taken part in a large number of flying operations. He has penetrated the defences of the Ruhr on eighteen occasions, in addition to participating in attacks on Berlin, Hamburg and Rostock. In March 1943, in the Bremen area, his aircraft was attacked by a Messerschmitt 110. The enemy fighter was destroyed by the front gunner. Shortly after, another attack was made by a Junkers 88. During the combat which ensued, Pilot Officer Dickson again displayed outstanding airmanship and again furnished his gunners with opportunities for retaliation. His skill undoubtedly made a safe return possible. Pilot Officer Dickson's sustained gallantry over a very long period has been most meritorious." Post war he served with 435 Squadron and 426 Squadron and was awarded the Air Force Cross for services during the Korean Air Lift. He later served with 412 Squadron before his life was cut short. He died of polio in the UK on 26th July 1953.
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CWGC North Luffenham (St. John the Baptist) Churchyard - North Luffenham, Rutland, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC North Luffenham (St. John the Baptist) Churchyard - North Luffenham, Rutland, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

RCAF Canadair Sabre II F-86E 19137 Ran out of fuel in thick fog and crashed near Loughborough, Leicestershire. Flying Officer David Gordon Tracey was found in the cockpit and buried back here near his home base.
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CWGC North Luffenham (St. John the Baptist) Churchyard - North Luffenham, Rutland, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Flying Officer Pattee Vernon Robinson died on the 14th December 1954 when his RCAF Canadair Sabre II F-86E 19234 while on a test flight from Ringway (Manchester Airport) due to this aircraft being re-conditioned before being transferred to the Greek air force.

The Sabre was seen flying low over the Holme Valley in low cloud. The cause of the crash was attributed to pilot error in not taking the high ground into account.
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CWGC North Luffenham (St. John the Baptist) Churchyard - North Luffenham, Rutland, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Navigator Keith Lauchlan Campbell and Air Gunner Richard Hubert Lewis were part of a 4 man crew that took off from RAF North Luffenham in Vickers Wellington BK268 on the 26th February 1943 to attack Cologne. In total, 427 aircraft were involved with 10 losses (2.3%). Most of the bombing fell in the south-west of the city with many industrial, utility and residential buildings badly damaged or destroyed, along with some churches.

Their aircraft crashed near RAF Woolfox Lodge, Rutland on return leg. One engine was on fire at the time and all crew members were killed.
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CWGC North Luffenham (St. John the Baptist) Churchyard - North Luffenham, Rutland, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The crew of Vickers Wellington N2761 left RAF Westcott on the 6th February 1943 on a night cross country training flight carrying eight flash bombs, a photoflash, camera and IFF.

At 10,000 feet the port motor burst into flames and the Wellington was partially abandoned at 5,000 feet before crashing at 00.50 hrs at Fletcher field near Ashley, Corby, Northamptonshire.

Air Bomber Eric Norman Common and Pilot Tom Lindley were killed in the crash.
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CWGC North Luffenham (St. John the Baptist) Churchyard - North Luffenham, Rutland, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator Ronald George Walters of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, was killed on the 29th August 1942 when his Vickers Wellington DV834 crashed on a night training flight from North Luffenham. The aircraft stalled and burst into flames as it hit the ground after swinging violently on take off.
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CWGC North Luffenham (St. John the Baptist) Churchyard - North Luffenham, Rutland, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Observer Hugh Morrison and Pilot James Roslyn Young were part of a 3 man crew in Bristol Blenheim L9206 that took off from RAF Bicester for day navigation training on the 2nd May 1942.

Their aircraft crashed 8 miles east of Leicester. The aircraft was seen to dive almost vertically, hit the ground and explode. All 3 crew were killed. The third crew member, Pilot George William Boggess is buried in his home town on Merseyside.
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CWGC North Luffenham (St. John the Baptist) Churchyard - North Luffenham, Rutland, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 12th April 1942, Handley Page Hampden AT155 stalled and crashed near Oakham, Rutland when on an air test from RAF North Luffenham. Pilot David Lloyd Carnegy Liddell of Balfour, Southland, New Zealand, was killed along with his crew member.
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CWGC North Luffenham (St. John the Baptist) Churchyard - North Luffenham, Rutland, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 9th March 1942, Handley Page Hampden AD842 crashed on the flare path at RAF North Luffenham 4 minutes after take off for a mine sweeping operation. 3 of the 4 crew members were killed

Crew
Pilot: Sgt D C Hunter RCAF Injured

Observer: 1166456 Sgt Richard Ball Calow Congregational Chapelyard Derbyshire

Wireless Operator/Air Gunner: R/68538 Flt Sgt Fernand Fagan MacKinnon RCAF North Luffenham (St John the Baptist)

Wireless Operator/Air Gunner: 751295 Sgt William Douglas Morris North Luffenham (St John the Baptist)
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CWGC North Luffenham (St. John the Baptist) Churchyard - North Luffenham, Rutland, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 9th March 1942, Handley Page Hampden AD842 crashed on the flare path at RAF North Luffenham 4 minutes after take off for a mine sweeping operation. 3 of the 4 crew members were killed

Crew
Pilot: Sgt D C Hunter RCAF Injured

Observer: 1166456 Sgt Richard Ball Calow Congregational Chapelyard Derbyshire

Wireless Operator/Air Gunner: R/68538 Flt Sgt Fernand Fagan MacKinnon RCAF North Luffenham (St John the Baptist)

Wireless Operator/Air Gunner: 751295 Sgt William Douglas Morris North Luffenham (St John the Baptist)

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CWGC North Luffenham (St. John the Baptist) Churchyard - North Luffenham, Rutland, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator Albert Barclay Wright lost his life on the 25th January 1942 when his Handley Page Hampden AD782 dived into the ground from 1,500 feet shortly after take-off from RAF Luffenham for a raid on Brest.
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CWGC North Luffenham (St. John the Baptist) Churchyard - North Luffenham, Rutland, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 9th November 1941, the crew of Handley Page Hampden AE311 took off from RAF North Luffenham to bomb the Blohm and Voss submarine works at Hamburg,

After completing the raid and arriving back to base, their aircraft swung on touch down & collided with airfield control caravan. Aircraftsman Frederick George Malin and Aircraftsman George Roberts who were in the caravan, were killed. The crew escaped largely unhurt.
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CWGC North Luffenham (St. John the Baptist) Churchyard - North Luffenham, Rutland, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 7th September 1941, Wireless Operator Eric Horton was part of a 4 man crew in Handley Page Hampden AE304 when it crashed near Stamford, 3 minutes after taking off from RAF North Luffenham to raid Berlin. All 4 crew members were killed.
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CWGC North Luffenham (St. John the Baptist) Churchyard - North Luffenham, Rutland, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Observer Harold Douglas Weaver lost his life, along with his 3 crew members, when their Handley Page Hampden X3030 of 144 Squadron crashed after take off from RAF North Luffenham to raid Frankfurt on the 20th September 1941.
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CWGC North Luffenham (St. John the Baptist) Churchyard - North Luffenham, Rutland, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

It was then the short hop across the border into Northamptonshire to visit the Kettering London Road Cemetery. There are a number of CWGC burials across the site, with some forming a small war graves plot.

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CWGC Kettering (London Road) Cemetery - Kettering, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 19th February 1945, Flying Officer Douglas Richard Gould was taking part in a cross-country flying training exercise in Avro Lancaster NE179 when, while in the process of changing fuel tanks at 21,000ft, the aircraft dived out of control, making baling out extremely difficult. Nevertheless most, if not all, were successful, however many did so from less than 500' and were badly injured as a result. Crashed at Kingston, East Lothian.

Douglas and one other crew member did not make it out of the aircraft and is buried here in his home town.
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CWGC Kettering (London Road) Cemetery - Kettering, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Sergeant Peter Morris was the Flight Engineer on Avro Lancaster LM176 when it took off from RAF Kirmington, North Lincolnshire on the night of the 4th December 1944, to raid Karlsruhe. On return the Lancaster spun and crashed into Brocklesby Park, close to the airfield.

He was one of 6 crew members killed in the crash.
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CWGC Kettering (London Road) Cemetery - Kettering, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Kettering (London Road) Cemetery - Kettering, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Kettering (London Road) Cemetery - Kettering, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Officer Raymond Mayhew Lewin GC of the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAFVR) was awarded the George Cross for the courage he showed in rescuing his co-pilot from their burning plane on 3 November 1940 in Malta.

The citation was published in the London Gazette of 7 March 1941

In November, 1940, Sergeant Lewin was the captain of an aircraft on a night bombing mission. Shortly after the take off the aircraft began to sink and crashed into a hillside where it burst into flames. Sergeant Lewin extricated himself and saw three of his crew of four climbing out of the escape hatch. He ordered them to run clear. He then ran round the blazing wing in which full petrol tanks were burning and crawled under it to rescue his injured second pilot. Despite his own injuries - a cracked kneecap and severe contusions on the face and legs - he dragged and carried the pilot some 40 yards from the aircraft to a hole in the ground, where he lay on him just as the bombs exploded. This superbly gallant deed was performed in the dark under most difficult conditions and in the certain knowledge that the bombs and petrol tanks would explode.

On the 21st November 1941 he was killed flying in Vickers Wellington T2552 on a training flight which crashed near Oakington, Cambridgeshire.

He is buried here in is home town of Kettering.
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CWGC Kettering (London Road) Cemetery - Kettering, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Kettering (London Road) Cemetery - Kettering, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

After returning from Koln on the 31st May 1942 and attempting an emergency landing near a flour mill at Soham 13 miles NE of Cambridge, Vickers Wellington Ic overturned and crashed. Sergeant Donald George Green was one of crew members killed in the crash.
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CWGC Kettering (London Road) Cemetery - Kettering, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Sergeant Alexander Richard Minney of Candleriggs, Glasgow, lost his life on the night of the 27th September 1942 when the Armstrong Whitworth Whitley BD376 crashed whilst in landing pattern at RAF Stanton Harcourt on a training flight and burst into flames on impact.
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CWGC Kettering (London Road) Cemetery - Kettering, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator Sergeant Arthur Marlow and the rest of his crew took off in Vickers Wellington BK268 from RAF Croft to attack Cologne.

Mission :

427 aircraft, 10 losses (2.3%). Most of the bombing fell in the south-west of the city with many industrial, utility and residential buildings badly damaged or destroyed, along with some churches.

His aircraft, with one engine on fire, crashed near Woolfox Lodge, Rutland, on the return leg.
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CWGC Kettering (London Road) Cemetery - Kettering, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Kettering (London Road) Cemetery - Kettering, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Kettering (London Road) Cemetery - Kettering, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Kettering (London Road) Cemetery - Kettering, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Leading Aircraftman RN Stan Palmer went to Kettering Central School where he was considered to be an above average pupil. He joined the Fleet Air Arm towards the end of the war and was based at HMS Nightjar, a shore based station near Elswick, Lancashire, on the Fylde coast. He was on anti-submarine work and had been recommended for promotion to Petty officer. He was killed in a flying accident over the Isle of Man on the 12th May 1945, flying in a Fairey Barracuda bomber. The crew of three, including Stan, were all killed.
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CWGC Kettering (London Road) Cemetery - Kettering, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr
User avatar
SuffolkBlue

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 03/10/2019**

Postby SuffolkBlue on Fri 04 Oct 2019, 4:18 pm

After leaving Kettering I visited 2 sites in the county town, Northampton. The first of these was Kingsthorpe Cemetery.

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CWGC Northampton (Kingsthorpe) Cemetery - Northampton, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator Reginald William Bodsworth was part of a crew that took off on the 20th February 1944 in Short Sunderland W6028 to simulate a fight with a Bristol Beaufighter of 235 Squadron. 235 Squadron had been sent to Fermanagh to help cover convoys.

The training exercise involved both planes flying low and fast. The Sunderland approached St Angelo airfield, County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland from the north-east following the line of the road. The catastrophic damage was caused in trying to avoid a small hill in Trory near the coast.

Coming down on a road in the area from where the Devenish ferry sails, the Flying Boat was so low that the damaged wing cut telephone lines. It came down in the fields near St Angelo at 1250hrs.

Of the ten-man crew, eight were injured including Sergeant S Ford, Sergeant SB Irving, Flying Officer A Tomlinson, Flying Officer IF Dotwiller, Flight Sergeant BF Jones, Sergeant TH Chappel, Sergeant JS Eadie, and Sergeant GS Fleming. The aircrew was made up of both the Royal Air Force and Royal Canadian Air Force.

Sergeant Reginald William Bodsworth died the following day as a result of his injuries. Air-gunner Leslie Arthur Hebenton died at the scene.

A local man, James Lunny, received a bravery medal for his help in assisting survivors. The broken up plane was strewn across the field and caught fire.
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CWGC Northampton (Kingsthorpe) Cemetery - Northampton, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Northampton (Kingsthorpe) Cemetery - Northampton, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 2nd February 1941, 255 Squadron Boulton Paul Defiant I N3306 stalled on final approach at RAF Kirton-in-Lindsey, Lincolnshire, due to pilot error on a training flight.

Sgt Alan R Jacobs is buried here in his home town of Northampton.
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CWGC Northampton (Kingsthorpe) Cemetery - Northampton, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Northampton (Kingsthorpe) Cemetery - Northampton, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 9th March 1944, Air Bomber John MacMillan-Clark and crew of Handley Page Halifax V, DJ998, 1667 Heavy Conversion Unit, took off from RAF Sandtoft, North Lincolnshire at 13.30hrs on a training flight for dual circuits and landings. Only 5 minutes into the flight, Halifax spun into the ground from 700ft, bursting into flames as it impacted at Belton, roughly 7 miles west-south-west from Scunthorpe, Lincolnshire. Four of the seven man crew were buried at Harrogate (Stonefall) Cemetery, while the other's, including John, were buried in their home towns.
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CWGC Northampton (Kingsthorpe) Cemetery - Northampton, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 12th August 1941, Observer Stanley Charles Mayes and his crew boarded Handley Page Halifax L9562 at RAF Middleton St. George, County Durham for an operation to Berlin. After receiving flak damage over the target, they managed to get the aircraft back to home skies were it burst into flames and crashed. Stanley is buried here in his home town.
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CWGC Northampton (Kingsthorpe) Cemetery - Northampton, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Blackburn Botha I W5180 took off from R.A.F. Evanton, Ross and Cromarty, Scotland, crashed on the airfield at approximately 17.35 hours on the 21st May 1942. Rear Gunner LAC Aubrey, E. F.F.30756 was extricated from the gun turret, removed to S.S.Q. for emergency treatment and then transferred to Fort George Military Hospital where he subsequently died from shock resulting from third degree burns to right hand and right leg and extensive second degree burns to the rest of his body. The other three occupants of the aircraft, F/Sgt Ian Telfer 1059804, LAC Leslie Hutt 1216327 1216327, Cpl Ernest Alexander Gournac F.F.30764 received severe multiple injuries from which they almost certainly were instantly killed and were subsequently grossly burned. The bodies were eventually removed from the aircraft and transferred to the Station Mortuary.
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CWGC Northampton (Kingsthorpe) Cemetery - Northampton, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Northampton (Kingsthorpe) Cemetery - Northampton, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator Ernest Maurice Hollowell and his 4 crew members of 420 Sqn took off from RAF Middleton St. George, County Durham for a navigation exercise training flight on the 1st March 1943.

Half an hour after taking off the aircraft was seen flying level and at a height of around 2,000 feet near Danby Wiske. Without warning to witnesses on the ground the port wing was seen to collapse and break off resulting in the aircraft then diving into the ground from around 1,500 feet. There was no time for anyone to escape the aircraft and all on board were sadly killed. An investigation found that a failure in joints in the main spar had resulted in the port main plane collapsing.
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CWGC Northampton (Kingsthorpe) Cemetery - Northampton, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Then it was the short drive across town to visit Towcester Road Cemetery. Here there is a large war grave plot with the vast majority of the casualties being from first world war.
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CWGC Northampton (Towcester Road) Cemetery - Northampton, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

William Argyle Campbell was born at Flemington, Victoria, Australia in 1894.

He enlisted in Perth, Western Australia on the 5th January, 1917 with the Australian Imperial Force and was posted to Railways Corps on the 10th January, 1917 for recruit training.

After arriving in England on the 27th April, 1917, he was soon leaving to France via Southampton on the 17th May 1917 and joined the 5th R.O.C. (Railway Operating Group) in
After a period of leave in England from the the 3rd August to the 19th August, 1918, he was sent back to France and soon promoted to 2nd Corporal on 7th September, 1918.

On the 3rd November, 1918, he was admitted to the 7th Canadian General Hospital at Etaples, France, with influenza and then transferred by ambulance train 37 on the 6th November, 1918. He embarked from France for England on Hospital Ship Princess Elizabeth on the 6th November, 1918.
After being admitted to Northamptonshire War Hospital, he died at 8 am on 11th November 1918, Armistice Day.
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CWGC Northampton (Towcester Road) Cemetery - Northampton, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Northampton (Towcester Road) Cemetery - Northampton, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator Arthur Alfred Chambers was killed whilst flying in Vickers Wellington III, DF743 of No 22 OTU, when it flew into the ground after emerging from cloud at Withington, Gloucestershire, during a cross-country training flight from RAF Gaydon, Warwickshire.
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CWGC Northampton (Towcester Road) Cemetery - Northampton, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

George Reeve was born in Spratton, Northamptonshire on the 21st February 1886. He was one of four Reeve brothers who served in the First World War – George, Richard (known as Harry), Samuel and Sidney. Harry was the only one to survive.

As a regular soldier, he was sent to France with the British Expeditionary Force in August 1914 as soon as war was declared. He served with great distinction throughout, fighting at Mons in 1914 as well as the battles of the Marne, the Aisne, La Bassee, Ypres, Neuve Chapelle , Festubert, Loos, the Somme, Arras and Cambrai right through to early 1918. He was wounded in action at least four times, commissioned in the field for gallantry and won both the Military Medal and the Military Cross. George was promoted from Sergeant to acting Regimental Sergeant Major on the 19th April 1915 and by November of that year he had been commissioned as a Second Lieutenant. He was mentioned in Sir John French’s New Year despatches on the 1st January 1916 and promoted to full Lieutenant on the 5th February 1918.

In the early summer of 1915 George was on patrol duty near Hill 60, south of Ypres, when he was wounded in the head by a hand grenade. He was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry and good service at the Second Battle of Ypres in 1915 and also received his commission.

He was wounded again on 18 January 1916 while raiding enemy trenches near Beaumont Hamel in the Somme area. He and another injured officer were dragged to safety by an orderly under constant heavy fire. (The orderly was subsequently awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal.) George was treated in the Red Cross hospital at Rouen and then sent home to England. He was back at the front line again later in the year and took over command of C Company, Royal Irish Fusiliers. He was wounded fighting around Guillemont and Ginchy during the final stages of the battle of the Somme on the 12th October 1916. He was treated in the military hospital at Etaples for a leg wound and shell shock and then transferred to England for further treatment.

On the 3rd May 1917 his Company was held up on the Roeux-Gravrelle Road by heavy machine gun fire from the south and the north and there were many casualties. His men were mixed up with men of other battalions. George, despite being wounded, collected together all the Irish Fusiliers, re-organised them, and dug in on a line from west of the Chateau to the railway embankment where he established himself and remained until recalled by order some hours later. He was successful in withdrawing with few casualties and bringing his wounded with him. His gallantry and devotion to duty were recognised by the award of the Military Cross and he returned to London where he was presented with his medal by King George V at Buckingham Palace.

The citation for the Military Cross, published in the London Gazette on 18 July 1917, reads:

“For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He showed great resource and determination in assuming command of his company when all other officers were casualties, in reorganising men of other companies, in digging in and maintaining his position. He subsequently withdrew and brought all his wounded with him. His skill was most marked.”

Late in 1918, George was sent back to England and attached to the 52nd Battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps at Colchester, Essex. He was killed in a road accident on the 14th October 1918. He was walking from the Barracks towards Colchester when he was hit by a taxi. He suffered a fractured skull and died the following morning in hospital.
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CWGC Northampton (Towcester Road) Cemetery - Northampton, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Walter Charles Ebden Cox was born at Sale, Gippsland, Victoria in 1883. He enlisted at Bairnsdale, Victoria on the 20th March, 1915 with the Australian Imperial Force (A.I.F.). His service number was 852. His next of kin was listed as his mother.

Walter was posted to Depot Battalion on the 31st March, 1915 for recruit training and transferred to “D” Company of 24th Battalion on the 28th April 1915. He embarked from Melbourne, Victoria on HMAT Euripides (A14) on the 10th May 1915 with the 6th Infantry Brigade, 24th Infantry Battalion, “D” Company and proceeded to join M.E.F. (Mediterranean Expeditionary Force) on Gallipoli Peninsula on the 30th August 1915.

He disembarked at Alexandria from Mudros on the 10th January 1916 to join the B.E.F. (British Expeditionary Force) and landed in Marseilles on the 26th March 1916.

On the 5th August 1916 he was “evacuated wounded” in France and admitted to 4th Field
Ambulance with a gun shot wound to his spine and shell shock. He sailed for England at Boulogne on Hospital Ship Stad Antwerpen on the 14th August 1916. He was admitted to Northampton War Hospital, England on 14th August 1916.

His condition was reported as “no improvement” on the 3rd September 1916 & “somewhat weaker” on the 5th September, 1916.

He died on 22nd September, 1916 at War Hospital, Duston, Northampton.
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CWGC Northampton (Towcester Road) Cemetery - Northampton, Northamptonshire, Monday 12th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr
User avatar
SuffolkBlue

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 04/10/2019**

Postby hedgerowops1 on Mon 07 Oct 2019, 5:40 pm

Thanks for takeing the time and trouble to publish all of this I have found it all very interesting, I was at the Yeovilton airday when the harrier pilot got killed heard a bang looked across and saw everyone running to where the harrier was parked so sad.
regards Chris
hedgerowops1

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 04/10/2019**

Postby SuffolkBlue on Fri 11 Oct 2019, 10:04 pm

Another local day tour coming up...this time around the vicinity of North East Essex.

Colchester Cemetery was opened in 1856. There are 267 Commonwealth burials of the first world war here, most of which are scattered around the site. However, there are a number of "small plots" around the cemetery, including 11 Australian graves.

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CWGC Colchester Cemetery - Colchester, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Colchester Cemetery - Colchester, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Colchester Cemetery - Colchester, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Colchester Cemetery - Colchester, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Colchester Cemetery - Colchester, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Colchester Cemetery - Colchester, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Colchester Cemetery - Colchester, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Colchester Cemetery - Colchester, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Colchester Cemetery - Colchester, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Colchester Cemetery - Colchester, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Colchester Cemetery - Colchester, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

There are also 114 Commonwealth burials of the second world war and post-war here, 1 of which is unidentified. In the early months of the second world war, shortly after the enlargement of the cemetery, land was set aside in the newer part for service war burials. This is now the War Graves Plot.

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CWGC Colchester Cemetery - Colchester, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Colchester Cemetery - Colchester, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Colchester Cemetery - Colchester, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Colchester Cemetery - Colchester, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Colchester Cemetery - Colchester, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

After leaving Colchester I paid a visit to the first coastal location, Clacton-on-Sea. Here there are 2 small war grave plots in the town's main cemetery.
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CWGC Clacton Cemetery - Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Walter Ernest Herriot was born at Glen Waverley, Victoria, Australia, in 1895.

He enlisted on the 14th July 1915 with the Australian Imperial Force (A.I.F.). As he was under the age of 21, his mother was required to sign her consent for her son to enlist in the Australian Imperial Force for active service abroad. He embarked from Melbourne, Victoria on HMAT Nestor on the 11th October, 1915 with the 7th Infantry Battalion, 11th Reinforcements.

He was taken on strength of 59th Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt on the 26th February, 1916 before embarking from Alexandria to join the British Expeditionary Force in June of that year.

The next month he was wounded in action in France on the 19th July and admitted to 32nd Stationary Hospital at Wimereux, France on the 21st July with gunshot wounds to his right groin. From there he arrived in Boulogne and onwards to England on Hospital Ship Cambria.

On the 14th August, he passed away at Middlesex Hospital, Clacton-on-Sea.


War Diary – 59th Battalion
SAILLY – 19th July, 1916:
12 Noon – Heavy bombardment of enemy lines. 60th Battalion relieved half our front from PINNEY AVENUE
inclusive.
7 pm - 59th Battn attacked enemy position in four waves. First wave going over parapet at 6.45 pm other three
waves following at five minute interval. Attack did not penetrate enemy trenches held up by intense rifle and machine
gun fire approximately 100 yds from enemy front line.
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CWGC Clacton Cemetery - Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

HMS Conquest was a C-class light cruiser of the Royal Navy that saw service during World War I. She was part of the Caroline group of the C class. Constructed by Chatham Dockyard, Conquest was laid down on the 3rd March 1914, launched on 20th January 1915, and completed in June 1915.

Conquest was commissioned into service in the Royal Navy in June 1915. She was assigned to the 5th Light Cruiser Squadron in Harwich Force, which operated in the North Sea to guard the eastern approaches to the Strait of Dover and English Channel.

In August 1915, she was among the ships which took part in the pursuit of the Imperial German Navy auxiliary cruiser Meteor in the North Sea which resulted in Meteor scuttling herself on the 9th August 1915. She covered the force that carried out the Royal Naval Air Service seaplane raid on the German Navy airship hangars at Tondern, then in northern Germany, on the 24th March 1916.

On the 28th March 1916, all 39 men were lost in a snowstorm off Harwich on one of the ship's boats, listed as a whaler, when returning from shore leave to the ship.
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CWGC Clacton Cemetery - Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Clacton Cemetery - Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Lance Corporal Albert James Thomson was wounded in action in France on the 8th August, 1916 and admitted to the 4th Field Ambulance the same day with a gunshot wound to his right leg.
He was admitted on the 10th August to the 2nd Australian General Hospital at Wimereux, France with shrapnel wounds to his buttock & fractured femur.

After arriving in England he admitted to the Middlesex Hospital here in Clacton-on-Sea. He died at 2.45 am on 14th August 1916 from wounds received in action in France – Gas, gangrene & shock.
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CWGC Clacton Cemetery - Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Clacton Cemetery - Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 10th August 1943, Wireless Operator Frank Pearce was on board Airspeed Oxford I X6807, when after vibration affected control while on searchlight cooperation mission, his aircraft crashed and he was killed.
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CWGC Clacton Cemetery - Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

SS British Fortune was a 4,696 GRT steam tanker that was sunk on the 31st October 1941 after being bombed by an aircraft 1 mile from Aldeburgh Light Buoy, Suffolk.
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CWGC Clacton Cemetery - Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Clacton Cemetery - Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Next it was to the All Saints Churchyard Extension just up the road in Walton-on-the-Naze. This extension forms a small park on the opposite side of the road to the church, with various memorials to the armed forces. It's up there with some of the quaintest locations I have been to so far.

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CWGC Walton-on-the-Naze (All Saints) Churchyard Extension - Walton-on-the-Naze, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Walton-on-the-Naze (All Saints) Churchyard Extension - Walton-on-the-Naze, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Walton-on-the-Naze (All Saints) Churchyard Extension - Walton-on-the-Naze, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Herbert George Columbine was private in the 9th Squadron, Machine Gun Corps, British Army during the First World War when the action for which he was awarded the VC took place.

On the 22nd March 1918 at Hervilly Wood, France, Private Columbine took over command of a Vickers gun and kept firing it from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in an isolated position with no wire in front. During this time wave after wave of the enemy failed to get up to him, but at last with the help of a low-flying aircraft the enemy managed to gain a strong foothold in the trench. As the position was now untenable, Private Columbine told the two remaining men to get away, and although he was being bombed on either side, he kept his gun firing, inflicting losses, until he was killed by a bomb which blew him up along with his gun.

He is named on the Pozières Memorial, in the Somme, to the missing of the Fifth Army.
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CWGC Walton-on-the-Naze (All Saints) Churchyard Extension - Walton-on-the-Naze, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

In one corner of the park, buried together, are more victims of HMS Conquest who lost their lives in the March 1916 snowstorm.
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CWGC Walton-on-the-Naze (All Saints) Churchyard Extension - Walton-on-the-Naze, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Walton-on-the-Naze (All Saints) Churchyard Extension - Walton-on-the-Naze, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Walton-on-the-Naze (All Saints) Churchyard Extension - Walton-on-the-Naze, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Walton-on-the-Naze (All Saints) Churchyard Extension - Walton-on-the-Naze, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Walton-on-the-Naze (All Saints) Churchyard Extension - Walton-on-the-Naze, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Dovercourt is a small seaside town in the Tendring district of Essex, near Harwich. There are 2 CWGC locations in the town within a short walk away from each other. The first of these I visited was the town's cemetery, where there is a small war grave plot with the rest of the burials scattered around the site.

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CWGC Dovercourt Cemetery - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Dovercourt Cemetery - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Elpenor was built in 1917 by Hawthorn Leslie & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 7601grt, a length of 455ft 4in, a beam of 56ft 4in and a service speed of 11 knots.

Following completion she commenced her first voyage under the Liner Requisition Scheme from Tyneside to Baltimore via the Mediterranean and in 1918 was used as a troop ship between Liverpool and Dublin.

She was handed over to her new owners, China Mutual Steam Navigation Co., in January 1919.

She was transferred to Glen Line in April 1935 and renamed SS Glenfinlas. On 6th April 1941 she survived an air attack by German bombers off the coast near Harwich, but 11 of her Chinese crew members were killed.
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CWGC Dovercourt Cemetery - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Dovercourt Cemetery - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Dovercourt Cemetery - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Dovercourt Cemetery - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The British steamship SS Skagerak left the Tyne to head to Ipswich but struck a mine, broke in two and sank on the 24 August 1941. Seventeen of her crew and the pilot were lost.
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CWGC Dovercourt Cemetery - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Dovercourt Cemetery - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Armstrong Whitlworth Whitley V, BD228, crashed on its return to RAF Temspford after the Operation LUCKYSHOT 8 / GRANTHAM I to Belgium on the 22nd October 1942.

The pilot, P/O Wreford William George Smith DFC, RAFVR was killed, and F/Sgt Ward - Navigator and Sgt Lamont the 2nd Pilot, were both injured.
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CWGC Dovercourt Cemetery - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Dovercourt Cemetery - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

SS Copenhagen was a passenger vessel built for the Great Eastern Railway in 1907. The ship was built by John Brown of Clydebank as one of a contract for three new steamers and launched on 22 October 1907. She was placed on the Harwich to Hook of Holland route.

On the 5th March 1917, she was torpedoed and sunk in the North Sea 8 nautical miles (15 km) east of the Noord Hinder Lightship by SM UC-61 with the loss of six lives. Fireman L J Randall passed away on the 13th March 1917 from injuries sustained in the attack.
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CWGC Dovercourt Cemetery - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The Rohilla was ordered in 1905 by the British India Steam Navigation Company (BI) from Harland & Wolff Ltd of Belfast. Although ordered for the London to Calcutta service, increased competition prompted BI to design theship to be suitable also as a troopship.

The steamship was named Rohilla in honour of the Rohillas, Pashtun highlanders who lived in Rohilkhand, east of Delhi, in the modern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.

Rohilla was called up at the outset of the First World War and converted into a naval hospital ship. HMHS Rohilla had only a short life in that role. On the 30th October 1914, sailing from South Queensferry, Firth of Forth for Dunkerque to evacuate wounded soldiers, the ship ran aground on Saltwick Nab, a reef about a mile east of Whitby, North Riding of Yorkshire, during a gale, as the lighthouses were unlit due to the war. The ship soon broke it's back.

Over the next three days, some of those who attempted to swim to safety in the raging seas were rescued, though many were lost, and lifeboats were able to rescue others. In all, 146 of the 229 on board, including Captain Neilson and all the nurses, as well as Titanic survivor Mary Kezia Roberts, survived.

Captain Nielson believed that the ship had struck a mine before grounding. An inquest jury exonerated Nielson from all blame and recommended that all passenger vessels carry rocket apparatus rather than rely on rockets fired to the ship from shore, and also that a motor lifeboat be stationed at Whitby.

The Gold Medal of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution, the highest honour the institute could award, was presented to Superintendent Major H. E. Burton and Coxswain Robert Smith of the Tynemouth lifeboat Henry Vernon and to Coxswain Thomas Langlands of the Whitby lifeboat. The Empire Gallantry Medal (subsequently changed to the George Cross) was awarded to Burton and Smith in 1924. In 1917 a monument was erected at Whitby by the British India Steam Navigation Company, commemorating all those who lost their lives in the tragedy.
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CWGC Dovercourt Cemetery - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

After taking the short walk I arrived at All Saints Churchyard. To say the churchyard was overgrown is rather a big understatement and it was a bit tricky locating some of the CWGC plots. However it did highlight the lengths the organisation go to in maintaining their sites, as every plot had been mowed and cared despite the jungle of grass and weeds, in this quiet corner of Essex.

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CWGC Dovercourt (All Saints) Churchyard - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Dovercourt (All Saints) Churchyard - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Dovercourt (All Saints) Churchyard - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Dovercourt (All Saints) Churchyard - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The L.N.E.R. Ship s.s. Amsterdam was a regular passenger ship sailing from Harwich to the Hook of Holland, with nearly all the crew coming from Harwich and Lowestoft. During the Battle of the Falaise Pocket in Normandy, casualties were evacuated aboard the Hospital Carrier Amsterdam. She made several successful Channel crossings where soldiers were taken to English ports but she struck a mine on the 7th August 1944. The engine room was destroyed along with about half of the craft and it started to list.

The QAs on board were up against the clock to get their patients below decks to the safety of the lifeboats. This quickly became dangerous and those patients who had lost lower limbs were helpless. The Sister in charge was Miss Dorothy Anyta Field of the QAIMNS and she bravely returned to the lower decks with fellow Sister Molly Evershed. Together they rescued 75 men even though the deck was angled to the surface of the water. Without a thought to their own safety they returned once more to rescue the wounded soldiers and sadly the Hospital Carrier Amsterdam sank taking the two QA Sisters with her.

Fifty-five wounded men were lost as were ten medical staff and thirty crew members. Also lost were eleven German prisoners of war.

In total, 106 people lost their lives, including Greaser G H Kettle.
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CWGC Dovercourt (All Saints) Churchyard - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 18th July 1915, the tanker SS Batoum was damaged in the North Sea, 5 kilometers east of the Southwold Lighthouse, Suffolk by the Imperial German Navysubmarine SM UB-17 with the loss of six of her crew. She was beached but was later refloated, repaired, and returned to service.
ImageCWGC Dovercourt (All Saints) Churchyard - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Dovercourt (All Saints) Churchyard - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Charles Algernon Fryatt was born on the 2nd December 1872 in Southampton before he and his family moved to Harwich.

On leaving school, Fryatt entered the Mercantile Marine, serving on SS County Antrim, SS Ellenbank, SS Marmion and SS Harrogate. In 1892, Fryatt joined the Great Eastern Railway as a seaman on SS Ipswich. Fryatt's father had been the First Officer on SS Cambridge. Fryatt rose through the ranks, serving on various ships. His first command was SS Colchester. In 1913, he was appointed master of SS Newmarket.

On the 3rd March 1915, Fryatt's command, SS Wrexham, a Great Central Railway ship, was attacked by a German U-boat. The ship was chased for 40 nautical miles (74 km). With deckhands assisting the stokers, the vessel made 16 knots (30 km/h) when it would normally have been pushed to make 14 knots (26 km/h). Wrexham arrived at Rotterdam with burnt funnels. The Great Eastern Railway presented Fryatt with a gold watch for this feat. The watch was inscribed Presented to Captain C. A. Fryatt by the chairman and Directors of the G.E Railway Company as a mark of their appreciation of his courage and skilful seamanship on March 2nd, 1915. Later that month he was in charge of Colchester when it was unsuccessfully attacked by a U-boat.


On the 28th March 1915, as captain of the SS Brussels, he was ordered to stop by U-33 when his ship was near the Maas lightvessel. Seeing the U-boat had surfaced to torpedo his ship, Fryatt ordered full steam ahead and proceeded to try to ram U-33, which was forced to crash dive. This action was in compliance with orders issued by Winston Churchill to captains of merchant ships. These orders included treating the crews of U-boats as felons and not as prisoners of war, in consideration of the German Empire's policy of unrestricted submarine warfare. White flags were to be ignored. Churchill's order also stated that survivors from U-boats might be shot if this was more convenient than taking them prisoner. If a captain were to surrender his ship he would be prosecuted by the British. The Germans became aware of these orders when they found a copy of them upon capturing the SS Ben Cruachan in October 1915. For this second action, Fryatt was awarded a gold watch by the Admiralty. The watch was inscribed Presented by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to Chas. Algernon Fryatt Master of the S.S. 'Brussels' in recognition of the example set by that vessel when attacked by a German submarine on March 28th, 1915.

On the 25th June 1916, Brussels left Hoek van Holland bound for Harwich. Lights were shown from the beach and a flare was fired. A passenger is reported to have remained on deck and signalled to shore. Five German destroyers surrounded Brussels and the passengers were told to prepare to take to the lifeboats and orders were given for official papers to be destroyed, which was done successfully. Brussels was taken by the Germans, and the radio was destroyed. She was escorted into Zeebrugge and then to Bruges.

Fryatt and his crew were sent to the civilian internment camp at Ruhleben, near Berlin. On the 16th July 1916, it was reported in the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf that Fryatt had been charged with sinking a German submarine. The Germans knew that U-33 had not been sunk and at the time of the trial she was on active service as part of the Constantinople Flotilla. The basis for the charge was the inscriptions on his watches.

Fryatt was tried at a court-martial on the 27th July 1916 at Bruges Town Hall. He was found guilty of being a franc-tireur and sentenced to death. At 19:00, Fryatt was executed by firing squad in Bruges within the harbour grounds. He was buried in a small cemetery just outside Bruges that the Germans used for burying Belgian traitors

An execution notice was published in Dutch, French and German announcing the death of Fryatt. It was signed by Admiral Ludwig von Schröder. A translation of the execution notice reads as follows:

NOTICE. The English captain of a merchant ship, Charles Fryatt, of Southampton, though he did not belong to the armed forces of the enemy, attempted on March 28th, 1915, to destroy a German submarine by running it down. For this he has been condemned to death by judgment this day of the Field Court Martial of the Naval Corps, and has been executed. A ruthless deed has thus been avenged, belatedly but just. Signed VON SCHRÖDER, Admiral Commandant of the Naval Corps, Bruges, July 27th, 1916.

On the 31st July 1916, British Prime Minister H. H. Asquith issued a statement in the House of Commons.

I deeply regret to say that it appears to be true that Captain Fryatt has been murdered by the Germans. His Majesty's Government have heard with the utmost indignation of this atrocious crime against the laws of nations and the usages of war. Coming as it does contemporaneously with the lawless cruelty towards the population of Lille and other occupied districts of France, it shews that the German High Command, under the stress of military defeat, have renewed their policy of terrorism. It is impossible of course to conjecture to what atrocities they may proceed.

His Majesty's Government desire to repeat emphatically their resolve that such crimes shall not, if they can help it, go unpunished. When the time arrives they are determined to bring to justice the criminals whoever they maybe and whatever position they may occupy. In such cases as these the authors of the system under which such crimes are committed may well be the most guilty of all. The question of what immediate action can be taken is engaging the earnest attention of the Government and I hope very soon to announce to the House of Commons what we can do.

Lord Claud Hamilton, MP, Chairman of the Great Eastern Railway, denounced the execution as sheer, brutal murder. The Mayor of Harwich opened a fund to erect a permanent memorial to Fryatt. A similar fund was opened in the Netherlands.

The Great Eastern Railway awarded Fryatt's widow a pension of £250 per annum. The Government granted her an extra £100 per annum pension on top of her entitlement. Fryatt's insurers, the Provident Clerk's Association, paid the £300 that Mrs Fryatt was entitled to immediately, dispensing with the usual formalities. The Royal Merchant Seaman's Orphanage offered to educate two of Fryatt's seven children. The King expressed his indignation and abhorrence at the execution of Fryatt in a letter to Mrs Fryatt. In the letter, he also wrote "The action of Captain Fryatt in defending his ship against the attack of an enemy submarine was a noble instance of the resource and self-reliance so characteristic of his profession."

In 1919, Fryatt's body was exhumed and returned to the United Kingdom for burial. His coffin was landed at Dover, and transported in South Eastern and Chatham Railway PMV No.132 to London. On the 8th July 1919, his funeral was held at St Paul's Cathedral. Hundreds of merchant seamen and widows of merchant seamen and fishermen attended.

Fryatt was then buried here at All Saints' Church, Upper Dovercourt.
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CWGC Dovercourt (All Saints) Churchyard - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Dovercourt (All Saints) Churchyard - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Dovercourt (All Saints) Churchyard - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Stoker Arthur Tame passed away at Chatham RN Barracks on on the 10th July 1915 following a short illness.
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CWGC Dovercourt (All Saints) Churchyard - Dovercourt, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Parkeston is a small village located on the River Stour, just a few miles east of Dovercourt and Harwich. Here there are a few CWGC burials, including a number of Czech graves. I've tried to do some research as to why they are located here, but without much luck so far.
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CWGC Ramsey (Parkeston) Cemetery - Parkeston, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Ramsey (Parkeston) Cemetery - Parkeston, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Ramsey (Parkeston) Cemetery - Parkeston, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Clan Monroe SS was a British Cargo Steamer of 5,925 tons built in 1918 by Ayrshire Dockyard, Irvine for The Clan Line Steamers Ltd (Cayzer, Irvine),Glasgow.

On the 29th July 1940 she struck a mine off Harwich whilst acting as auxiliary transport. She was taken in tow and beached in Hollesley Bay in a depth of 27 feet at low water. Thirteen of her crew were killed.
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CWGC Ramsey (Parkeston) Cemetery - Parkeston, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On Sunday 15th December 1940, the 'SS N.C. Monberg', an ex Danish cargo steamship, was on a passage from the Tyne for London carrying coal when it was sunk by an E-Boat off Aldeburgh, Suffolk, with twelve of her crew were lost.
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CWGC Ramsey (Parkeston) Cemetery - Parkeston, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 11th August 1940 the tanker SS Oiltrader 5550 tons,was attacked and badly damaged by German aircraft 3½ miles from Shipwash Light Vessel.
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CWGC Ramsey (Parkeston) Cemetery - Parkeston, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Ramsey (Parkeston) Cemetery - Parkeston, Essex, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Brantham is a small village located on the northern bank of the River Stour in Suffolk. Like hundreds of other rural churchs in the country, there is a cross of sacrifice here listing the local men and women who lost their lives in the two world wars.

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CWGC Brantham (St. Michael) Churchyard - Brantham, Suffolk, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Brantham (St. Michael) Churchyard - Brantham, Suffolk, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the night of 4th / 5th May 1943 the crew of 10 Squadron Handley Page Halifax JD105 undertook an operational flight to bomb Dortmund and had set out from their base of RAF Melbourne at 22.33hrs.

This raid on Dortmund saw 596 Allied aircraft attack the city but was not a complete success due to decoy fires attracting many of the bombs to be dropped in open country, the Allied Path Finding aircraft had also not accurately marked the target area but despite this severe damage was still reported to the city. This was the largest non-thousand bomber raid of the War to date and the first attack on Dortmund. On board Halifax JD105 for this flight was a trainee pilot who was flying with the 10 Squadron crew for operational experience before he and his own crew joined an operational squadron, he was training with 1658 Heavy Conversion Unit at the time. The crew of JD105 released their bomb load over the red / green target markers from 17,500 feet at 01.05hrs, they reported that the weather over the target area was good and also that heavy and accurate flak was encountered.

The aircraft was not damaged by flak and made for home but after leaving the target area the navigator complained that he was feeling ill so the captain reduced the height at which the aircraft was flying to try and help the navigator. His oxygen system may not have been operating as it should. On their return to England this aircraft received an order to divert to RAF Leeming because of poor weather over Melbourne and those in the area east of York. This aircraft appears to have been the only 10 Squadron aircraft to be diverted away from Melbourne to land possibly because it took them the longest to return to Yorkshire.

It was nearly an hour behind the other aircraft by the time it arrived over Yorkshire and most other 10 Squadron aircraft had landed by 04.00hrs. At 04.43hrs and while flying through fog towards Leeming the aircraft clipped the top of Hood Hill near Kilburn. The aircraft then bellied in, ran along the ground for about 150 yards and broke up. The engines and cockpit area travelled a distance down the hillside, with one engine ending up in a field at the bottom of the hill and with fires breaking out across the crash site. Five of the crew of eight were killed in the crash and three survived, one of these survivors was found laying in bluebells when rescue eventually came.

Wireless Operator / Air Gunner Sgt Herbert Henry Way is buried here in his home village.
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CWGC Brantham (St. Michael) Churchyard - Brantham, Suffolk, Tuesday 20th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr
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SuffolkBlue

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 11/10/2019**

Postby SteveGorzula on Sun 03 Nov 2019, 9:05 pm

It was quite an emotion to see this post and the photos of the gravestones and to find the account of the Whitley Z9145 at Givendale. Sgt. John Lyon Perrin was my mother’s first husband. They had only been married for about three months when he was killed. My mother died in 1989, but I remember her telling me about that terrible day.
SteveGorzula

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 11/10/2019**

Postby SuffolkBlue on Wed 06 Nov 2019, 10:13 pm

I have visited more sites during the later part of the summer which might take me sometime to research, but i'll try to update the thread as much as possible.

When down in Dorset for the Bournemouth Air Festival, i quickly paid a visit to Poole (Parkstone) Cemetery where there is a small war grave plot with numerous other CWGC graves dotted around the site.

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CWGC Poole (Parkstone) Cemetery - Poole, Dorset, Sunday 1st September 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The coaster HMS Abel Tasman struck a mine at the entrance to Poole Harbour, Dorset on the 13th June 1940. She sank with the loss of all on board.
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CWGC Poole (Parkstone) Cemetery - Poole, Dorset, Sunday 1st September 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Poole (Parkstone) Cemetery - Poole, Dorset, Sunday 1st September 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Consolidated Catalina FP287 crashed at Long Island, in Poole Harbour, Dorset on the 24th August 1943 while on a non-operational training flight. The aircraft overshot the landing path and was attempting to go around again when the aircraft flew into sea fog at the end of the flare path and crashed. Eight on board were killed, including Sergeant A B Allen, and four were injured.
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CWGC Poole (Parkstone) Cemetery - Poole, Dorset, Sunday 1st September 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Poole (Parkstone) Cemetery - Poole, Dorset, Sunday 1st September 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Aberconway John Sefton Pattinson was born on the 18th December 1918 in Chelsea, London, his father having been killed in action seven months previously. Pattinson joined the RAF on a short service commission in December 1937. He was posted to 5 FTS, Sealand on the March 5th 1938 and joined 25 Squadron at Hawkinge on the September 17th, flying Gloster Gladiators.

In early July 1940 Pattinson was with 23 Squadron at Collyweston, flying Bristol Blenheims. On September 5th he went to an OTU to convert to Supermarine Spitfires and was then posted to 92 Squadron at Biggin Hill in early October.

On his first sortie on October 12th he was shot down and killed by Me109’s over Hawkinge.

His Spitfire, X4591, crashed and burned out in Bartholomews Wood, Postling, Kent.
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CWGC Poole (Parkstone) Cemetery - Poole, Dorset, Sunday 1st September 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Gerald Arthur Townend was born at Ealing in South London on the 3rd of October 1893, the fourth and youngest son of the Reverend Alfred John Townend, Chaplain to the Forces, and Margaret Wiseman,

On leaving school he entered the Royal Military College Sandhurst from 1911 to 1912 and on the 22nd January 1913 he was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 9th Battalion Prince of Wales Volunteers (South Lancashire) Regiment. He landed in Salonika on the 6th of November 1915, became Battalion Adjutant, was promoted to Captain on the 11th of November 1915 and saw action on the Western Front, Macedonia, Serbia, Bulgaria and Turkey and the Aegean Islands during the Great War. On the 3rd June 1919 he was awarded the Military Cross for his service in the Balkans connected with the British Army of the Black Sea while attached to the 9th Battalion and was also mentioned in despatches.

After the war he served in India, was promoted to Major on the 4th July 1929 and retired from the army on the 4th February 1939 with the rank of Major on retirement pay. He was appointed as an Honorary Flight Lieutenant in the Royal Air Force on the 13th February 1939, a rank he relinquished on the 29th October 1939.

The following year he was recalled to the services, was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and was appointed as Commanding Officer of the 1st Battalion of his Regiment on the 18th June 1940.

On the 4th October 1941 the battalion was moving from Henlow to Parkstone Barracks in Dorset when he was killed in a motor cycle accident.

His brother, Captain Francis Whitchurch Townend 35th Signal Company, Royal Engineers, was killed in action on the 28th March 1915.
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CWGC Poole (Parkstone) Cemetery - Poole, Dorset, Sunday 1st September 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The Harbour Defence Motor Launch 1060 was sunk by an ammunition explosion in Poole Harbour. Three crew were killed, of which two are buried together here.
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CWGC Poole (Parkstone) Cemetery - Poole, Dorset, Sunday 1st September 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The crew of 419 (Moose) Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force took off from RAF Middleton St. George in Avro Lancaster XIX KB745 on the 4th October 1944 to attack the U-boat pens in Bergen, Norway.

On their way back the crew lost their bearings and the following morning the wreckage of the air craft was found by a shepherd on high ground at Goldscleugh near Rothbury, Scotland.

The 7 crew members were all killed of which 6 were buried at Harrogate (Stonefall) Cemetery. I have struggled to find out why Thomas Bernard Tierney is buried here in Poole.
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CWGC Poole (Parkstone) Cemetery - Poole, Dorset, Sunday 1st September 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

HMS Recoil was the former German trawler Blankenburg, captured on the 6th April 1940 off Norway by the British light cruiser HMS Birmingham and the British destroyers HMS Fearless and HMS Hostile. Taken over by the Admiralty in June 1940, she struck a mine off Portland Bill on the 28th September 1940.
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CWGC Poole (Parkstone) Cemetery - Poole, Dorset, Sunday 1st September 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Poole (Parkstone) Cemetery - Poole, Dorset, Sunday 1st September 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr
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SuffolkBlue

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 06/11/2019**

Postby CJS on Fri 08 Nov 2019, 8:51 am

I have to say Chris, this is a fascinating and sobering thread that you must spend an age putting together. Thank you :up:
"Forewarned is forearmed"
How do you know I didn't?
User avatar
CJS

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 06/11/2019**

Postby SuffolkBlue on Sun 10 Nov 2019, 10:27 pm

CJS wrote:I have to say Chris, this is a fascinating and sobering thread that you must spend an age putting together. Thank you :up:


Thank you for your kind comments and i'm not going to lie, researching the stories is a very time consuming task!....but well worth it. I still have around 25+ more sites to research that I visited across Kent and Lincolnshire, so i'll try to post them on here as soon as I can.

The Lincolnshire trip was a 2 day effort back in the summer, with the first day spent visiting sites along the A15 corridor from Cranwell to Scunthorpe and the second along the North East Coast before heading inland to Newark and Grantham.

Cranwell has been a flying training centre since the First World War when the Admiralty requisitioned 2500 acres of the Earl of Bristol's estate in November 1915, to create the Royal Naval Air Service Central Training Depot. Since then the aerodrome has been taken over by the Royal Air Force and the RAF Staff College is at Cranwell. The graves of 25 First World War airmen will be found on the northern side of the church. The churchyard was used between the wars for RAF burials and during the Second World War the RAF plot, in the eastern part of the churchyard, was used for service burials not only from RAF Cranwell but from others also, including Finningley and Binbrook. Cranwell (St Andrew) Churchyard contains 25 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and 58 from the Second. There are also four Polish war graves.

Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2e B3702 of RNAS Cranwell crashed and burnt our south of the airfield, killing Probationary Flight Officer Eric Henry Dyson on the 3rd December 1917.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Flt Lt Ernest Edward Beale was killed on the 13th December 1917 when his Sopwith Camel B5678 crashed in fog near RNAS Cranwell.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Albert Walter Gordon Crosby joined the RNAS in Canada and sent initially to the Naval Training Academy at Greenwich in October 1917 and then to the RNAS flight training school at Vendome, France in December 1917.

He was then transferred back to England to the RNAS Cranwell Training Facility in February 1918.

He was involved in a training flight crash on the 28th February 1918 and died of his injuries at the Belton Park Hospital (near Grantham) 10 days after the accident.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Flight Officer Howard Eckhardt Grundy of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, lost his life on the 20th March 1918 when his Bristol Scout Type C 3054 crashed in the fields near RNAS Cranwell.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

de Havilland DH9 D2792 stalled during a forced landing in the Cranwell area, killing 2Lt Cyril Montague Bates on the 24th April 1918.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Flight Cadet Peter Anthony Meakin died on the 27th April 1928, a day after his Armstrong Whitworth Siskin IIIA J8956, suffered engine failure and dived into the ground near RAF Cranwell.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Avro 504N J8709, of the RAF College collided with J9693 on the approach to RAF Cranwell on the 6th June 1930. Flt Lt Henry Leonard Drake was killed in the subsequent crash.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Avro 504N of the RAF College stalled and crashed into the ground near RAF Cranwell on the 25th April 1930 killing both Sgt William Henry Fearn and AC1 Leslie Edward Charlton.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 11th August 1995, Squadron Leader Paul Lockwood, his wife Jackie and 2 other passengers intended to fly their Beechcraft Baron 58 from Thruxton to Beaune, France.

After loading the baggage, the aircraft was taxied to the airfield refuelling pumps where it was refuelled with 178 litres of fuel and was described by the pump attendant as being "full up". After refuelling the pilot and his passengers got into the aircraft. Once they were all on board the pilot attempted to start the left engine but was unsuccessful twice
so he then started the right engine; this started with no difficulty but it emitted a cloud of exhaust smoke which is not unusual when starting a warm engine. He then recommenced starting the left engine and succeeded on his sixth or seventh attempt. This engine did not produce any visible
exhaust smoke. After the second engine start there was a delay of some three minutes whilst the pilot carried out his after-start checklist.

The takeoff was observed by two pilots in a helicopter that was hovering less than 100 yards from the runway. As G-BAHN passed the mid-point of the runway the forward passenger door,which is on the right side of the aircraft, was seen to open. An attempt was made to close the door
and a hand, presumably that of the male passenger was seen to hold the door as the aircraft rotated and climbed away using almost the entire runway length.

He flew straight ahead before turning to the left onto the crosswind leg and passing over St Nicholas' Church in the village of Fyfield. Shortly after takeoff the pilot radioed to
Thruxton that a door had come open and that he intended to carry out a low-level circuit in order to land and close it. Aircraft departing Thruxton are required to call Boscombe Down Airfield if they intend to climb more than 800 feet above airfield altitude as they will be entering Boscombe
airspace. The aircraft then flew at an altitude of between 200 and 400 feet in a northerly direction over Fyfield. Eyewitnesses report that during this time it steadily lost altitude and that the aircraft's engines were making an unusual noise described as 'spluttering'.

The aircraft flew over Fyfield village until it cleared the last house to the north where it appeared to stall, rolled to the left and crashed into a stubble field about 20 metres from the southern fence. All the occupants were fatally
injured during the impact and before the aircraft caught fire.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

U/T Pilot John Peter Houghton Stratton was killed on the 18th January 1946 whilst flying in North American Harvard II, FX228 of No 19 FTS, which collided with FT173 of the same unit whilst in the circuit at RAF Cranwell.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 30th January 2005, Royal Air Force Lockheed C-130K Hercules C3, serial number XV179, callsign Hilton 22, was shot down in Iraq, probably by Sunni insurgents, killing all 10 personnel on board. At the time, the incident was the largest single loss of life suffered by the British military during Operation Telic.

Patrick joined the Royal Air Force in June 1990 as a pilot, serving 11 operational tours on the Tornado GR. He was awarded a General Service Medal for Air operations in Iraq, an Operational Service Medal for Operation Telic and the NATO Medal for operations in the former Yugoslavia. His last job was as a Staff Officer at Headquarters Strike Command, Royal Air Force High Wycombe, where he was part of a team responsible for coordinating Royal Air Force support operations.

He was a staff officer serving with Headquarters Strike Command, High Wycombe, and was on temporary detachment to Iraq as a liaison officer.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Flight Lieutenant Anthony John Marvin was killed whilst flying in North American Harvard T2, KF443 of the RAF College when it crashed near Navenby, Lincolnshire after stalling on recovery from a number of spins on the 5th Febraury 1949.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Flight Cadet Alasdair Black died on the 6th January 1960 when his North American Harvard .2B of the Royal Air Force College Cranwell, crashed during aerobatics near Coleby Hall, Lincolnshire. The aircraft lost it's wings while recovering from a dive.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 20th April 1942, the crew of Vickers Wellington I, T2834 of No.3 (C) OTU were conducting a night flying exercise and whilst in the circuit of RAF Cranwell, their aircraft crashed close to Rauceby Vicarage killing both crewmen.

P/O. H E. Rath RCAF of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada and Sgt. K M. Miegel RAAF
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Officer Nigel Saunders of No. 98 Sqn was the pilot of de Havilland Vampire FB5 WA143 on a mock attack flight.

His aircraft was seen to break away from one practice attack with both the engine and wing roots on fire. His aircraft came down near Asherton Farm, Larkhill, Wiltshire and he received fatal injuries when he was thrown clear of the aircraft.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Flt Lt Vincent Lindsay Hobbs trained at No 3FTS, at RAF Henlow during 1970, and on Graduation was awarded the Sword of Honour. He rose through the ranks, and was promoted to Flight Lieutenant on 3rd June 1976, going on to serve at RAF Waddington flying Avro Vulcans before being posted to RAFC Cranwell to serve as a QFI in 1981.
Sadly, on 24th November 1981, Flt Lt Hobbs was involved in a road traffic accident and died at just 32 years old. He was to be married three days later.

The Hobbs Sword was presented to RAFC Cranwell by Flt Lt Hobbs’ father, in memory of his son, in 1993. It was presented for use by the OC 3FTS or Station Commander, to be worn at all ceremonial occasions other than weddings in accordance with the family’s wishes.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Bristol Bulldog K3928 of the RAF College, Cranwell was involved in a mid air collision with Hawker Hart K3152, also of the RAF College, Cranwell, near RAF Digby, Scopwick Heath, Lincolnshire.

Both crews were killed (two in each aircraft). None of the occupants of either aircraft were wearing parachutes.

Crew:
Pilot/Instructor: Flight Lt Joseph Seymour Tanner RAF (aged 26) killed.
Flight Cadet John Aickin Plugge RAF (New Zealander, aged 19) killed.

According to a contemporary newspaper report (The Sydney Morning Herald Thursday 3 May 1934)

"AIR FORCE 'PLANES.
Collision in Mid-air.
FOUR MEN KILLED.
LONDON, May 1.
A "Bulldog" fighting 'plane piloted by Flight Lieutenant Joseph Seymour Tanner, with Flight Cadet John Aickin Plugge, of Taupiri, New Zealand, as a passenger, collided in mid-air at Cranwell with a Hart Day bombing 'plane piloted by Flying-Officer Dennis John Douthwaite, with Flight Cadet John Askell Rutherfoord as a passenger. All four airmen were killed. The 'planes were engaged in flying training.

Occupants of a lonely farmhouse and a few labourers saw one machine flying south and the other west. They heard a crash like a thunderclap. All the victims were found dead in their 'planes. They had no time to use their parachutes. Labourers had to dodge falling fragments of the 'planes, which made huge holes in the ground. It took four hours to excavate the engines.

This Is the first accident Involving four deaths since February, 1933. It is the sixth fatal accident in the Royal Air Force In 1934, involving in all 11 deaths".
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Hawker Fury I K5682 piloted by Flight Lieutenant Roy James Oliphant Bartlett of the RAF College, Cranwell, collided with Hawker Fury K5681 (also of the RAF College, Cranwell) during camera gun practice on the 7th October 1936 near Navenby, North Kesteven, Lincolnshire.

He abandoned the aircraft but struck by one of the falling aircraft. Pilot: Flt/Lt Roy James Oliphant Bartlett RAF, killed. Aircraft crashed at Navenby, North Kesteven, Lincolnshire, eight miles south of Lincoln.

The other Fury pilot, Flight Cadet Howard Frizelle Burton was injured.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 9th November 1936. Avro Anson I K6199 took off from RAF Bircham Newton, Norfolk, when the aircraft stalled and crashed near the end of the runway. Pilot Officer Peter White was killed while both other occupants were injured.

The takeoff procedure was completed with the control systems locked. Modifications to locking bars were recommended by the Court of inquiry following this accident.

K6199 was Struck off Charge as E (G/I) and reduced to instructional airframe status by the 9th December 1936, the machine remained as a salutary reminder of the need for care in pre-flight checks until struck off charge in August 1937.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Flight Cadet Robert Adrian Greey Morgan was killed on the 8th May 1939 when his Hawker Audax I K7377 collided with K7458 while attacking a towed target near Stubton, Lincolnshire.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wing Commander Frederick Korsten Damant was killed on the 16th May 1941 whilst flying in Airspeed Oxford I, P1881, of the RAF College (FTS) when it crashed on take-off from RAF Cranwell on an air test.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Officer John James Campbell DFC flew 27 Handley Page Hampden operations as Captain and 9 in the 2nd Pilot position. He was killed on the 20th April 1941 whilst he was instructing at RAF Cranwell.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Flying Officer Frantisek Vocetka and Aircraftman D W Hughes were killed when their Percival Proctor P6234 of 1 Signals School, crashed on the 7th February 1941.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 7th May 1940, Pilot Officer JT Berryman on 22 Sqn lost his life in Bristol Beaufort L4466 when it stalled whilst approaching to land at RAF North Coates and dived into the ground. At the time of the crash he had 3hrs dual and 2hrs solo time on type.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Officer Nevil Fisher lost his life when his Bristol Bulldog IIA K1693 spun in and crashed at High Dyke Farm, Brauncewell, near Cranwell, while on a local sortie.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Flying Officer Dennis John Douthwaite and his trainee crew member Flt Cadet John Askell Rutherfoord lost their lives on the 1st May 1934 when their Bristol Buldog K3928 collided with Hawker Hart Trainer K3152 near Digby, Lincolnshrire.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Instructor Flying Officer Anthony Frederick Paul Anning and pupil Flight Cadet Arthur Moreland Acton-Adams Armstrong took of from RAF Cranwell on the 13th February 1931 in Whitworth Atlas TM K1187 for a local training flight. Their aircraft crashed due to a loss of speed on a gliding turn during approach for a practice forced landing. They were both killed.

A report stated :

"The instructor, who was an experienced pilot on this type of aeroplane, must have left the correction of this fault until a moment too late to pull the aeroplane out of the resultant dive."
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Kaspar Antonin lost his life on the 10th July 1941 when his Percival Proctor I, P6275, of No 1 Signals School dived into the ground at Leasingham in Lincolnshire after stalling in bad weather.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 24th April 1941 Pilot Officer Robert Lanchester and Pilot Officer Richard Inge of 2 CFS (Central Flying School), RAF Cranwell, crashed just to the North East of RAF Winthorpe, Nottinghamshire when flying in Avro Tutor K4814. They both were killed. The crash site is close to the Newark Air Museum and a small plaque there is dedicated to both crew members.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Flying Officer Edward Morris Cowperthwaite was killed whilst flying in Airspeed Oxford I, R5942 of the RAF College (FTS), when it dived into the ground near Great Gonerby, Lincolnshire, during a snowstorm on the 29th October 1941.
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CWGC Cranwell (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Cranwell, Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr
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SuffolkBlue

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 10/11/2019**

Postby SuffolkBlue on Sun 10 Nov 2019, 10:39 pm

In Grantham, during the First World War, there were machine gun camps and depots at Belton Park and a 620 bed military hospital. Most of the First World War burials are scattered throughout the towns cemetery but a number of Australian and New Zealand machine gunners are buried together in Section 15.

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CWGC Grantham Cemetery - Grantham, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Grantham Cemetery - Grantham, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Grantham Cemetery - Grantham, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Grantham Cemetery - Grantham, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr


There is a small group of RAF graves from the Second World War.
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CWGC Grantham Cemetery - Grantham, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On 22th December 1941, Handley Page Halifax L9522 crashed when en route from RAF Leconfield to the Handley Page facility at Radlett in bad weather near Knipton, Lincolnshire. 8 of her crew members were killed, of which 3 are buried here :

Corporal James Anthony Hancock, Sergeant James Albert Denning and Pilot Officer Richard Percival William Barker.
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CWGC Grantham Cemetery - Grantham, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Sgt Robert Gordon Goodenough Gain lost his life on the 29th October 1941 when his aircraft was destroyed after it flew into the ground in a blizzard, whilst on a flight from Nottingham to Wittering.
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CWGC Grantham Cemetery - Grantham, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The main Second World War grave plot is opposite the town's memorial to the civilian war dead, and the remainder are in various other parts of the cemetery.

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CWGC Grantham Cemetery - Grantham, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 27th January 1941, air raid sirens sounded over Grantham when a lone aircraft approached the town from the East. At 14.14hrs, the aircraft was 5 miles to the East at about 1000ft with two Hawker Hurricanes ordered to intercept.

The lone raider, a Ju 88 approached from the North East, slipping between the airfields at RAF Spittlegate and RAF Barkston Heath and began it's low level bomb-run on the munitions workshops. They could not find their target and to gain height, released 14 bombs whilst strafing the streets. At 14.20hrs they struck Jubilee Avenue and New Beacon Road.

The defences were stood down as the aircraft disappeared only to re-appear again a few minutes later, diving out of the cloud at a low angle and heading for Springfield Road. The remainder of the 4 x HE bombs hit the factory complex.

The aircraft was seen to fly East, suffering from anti aircraft damage and later crash-landed in a field at Fishtoft, near Boston, and the crew of 4 were taken prisoner.

The civilians killed in the raid are remembered here.
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CWGC Grantham Cemetery - Grantham, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 15th March 1942, whilst with 12 FTS (Service Flying Training School) Royal Air Force, Flight Lieutenant Richard John Jouault was killed when the aircraft that he was piloting, Airspeed Oxford AP645 collided shortly after take-off with another Oxford AP641. The pilot and pupil iAP641, Flying Officer Derek Reginald Olver and Sergeant Julius Lee Wyatt respectively, were also killed in the resulting crash.
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CWGC Grantham Cemetery - Grantham, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 15th March 1942, whilst with 12 FTS (Service Flying Training School) Royal Air Force, Flying Officer Willem Bastiaan Straver was killed when the aircraft in which he was a pupil in, Airspeed Oxford AP645 collided shortly after take-off with another Oxford AP641. The pilot of Oxford AP645, Flight Lieutenant Richard John Jouault and the pilot and pupil in Oxford AP641, Flying Officer Derek Reginald Olver and Sergeant Julius Lee Wyatt respectively, were also killed in the resulting crash.
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CWGC Grantham Cemetery - Grantham, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The crew of Avro Manchester R5841, 1660 HCU took off from RAF Swinderby, Lincolnshire on the 11th April 1943 for circuit training. During the flight one engine caught fire, possibly due to a fractured hydraulic line. The pilot had no option but to crash-land near the River Brant at 18.50hrs.

Of the 6 crew members on board, Flight Lieutenant J.M. Whitwell AFM lost his life and another crew member was killed in the crash, while another later lost his life in hospital.
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CWGC Grantham Cemetery - Grantham, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On 18th June 1943, Avro Lancaster I ED439 OL-N crashed at Highgate Farm, Swaton, Lincolnshire.

The Lancaster’s pilot was Australian Flight Sergeant Max Kieran Cummings. They crew were new to 83 Squadron at RAF Wyton, Cambridgeshire. Recently posted from 467 Squadron at RAF Bottesford, Leicestershire, they completed a night raid on Cologne, Germany, the previous night.

At 1010hrs on 18th June 1943, Cummings crew took off for “daytime bombing practice”. Research suggests the crew tested new equipment as there were two ground technicians joining the seven-man crew.

Eyewitnesses report the Lancaster dived from low cloud into the farm near Scredington. The plane clipped the roof of an unoccupied farmhouse before crashing into the fields behind. It struck a copse of trees and burst into flames.

Locals arrived to offer help but the flames and debris suggested there was little they could do. Ammunition from the plane began to explode creating further danger for those on the ground.
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CWGC Grantham Cemetery - Grantham, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Sigfred Johannes Christophersen was born on the 11th July 1914.

He joined the Danish Royal Guards in November 1935, and accepted for flying training at the Army Flying School on the 1st April 1937.

He is discharged from the school on the 10th September 1938 and is unemployed for the next six months. He then spent some time working in Germany as a gardener when in January 1940, he volunteered to become a pilot in the Finno-Russian Winter War, but it is not clear if he actually was engaged in operational duties before the end of hostilities in March 1940.

He then returned to Denmark and worked at the German occupied Værløse Air Station.

On the 26th December 1940, he left Denmark accompanied by his friend Jørgen Thalbitzer, who later become a fighter pilot with the RAF and was killed in action in 1943. They travelled to Istanbul, Cyprus, Suez, and Cape Town until they arrived in London on the 23rd April 1941.

He and Thalbitzer volunteered for the Royal Air Force at the British Air Attaché in Istanbul but in London, he accepts an offer by British Intelligence to be trained in radio-telegraphy. Without knowing it at the time he has been enrolled in the Special Intelligence Service.

On the 10th September 1941 at 1946 hours he boarded Armstong Whitworth Whitley of No. 138 Squadron and took off from RAF Newmarket bound for Denmark, along with another member of SIS. The aircraft crossed the Danish coast near Esbjerg and they encountered flak. At 2335 hours the two agents are successfully dropped near Holbæk.

Christophersen and the other agent never succeedd together as agents, since they never really got to trust each other. According to different sources he seems to be the one to blame. In the end of February 1942, Christophersen is so compromised that he is ordered to leave the country by the agent.

On the night of the 3rd March 1942, he attempted to cross the ice covered waters between Stevns in Denmark and the peninsular Falsterbo in Sweden. He is accompanied by his brother Thorbjørn Christophersen and another member of the resistance Kaj Oxlund. Due to bad weather they struggled to make the shore and were picked up by a Swedish fishermen.

He is imprisoned in Malmø, Sweden, and interrogated by the local authorities. During the interrogation he reveals many details on his whereabouts and activities in Denmark.

In mid-June 1942 he and the other agents are transferred to England via Bromma and Leuchars in a Lockheed Hudson. They are imprisoned in the Brixton Prison upon their arrival.

After being released, he commences pilot training and was accepted for Royal Air Force in 1941 at the same time as Thalbitzer. No he returns for pilot training.

On the 10th August 1943, he was killed in a training accident when on a nighte exercise in Bristol Blenheim I K7050 from No. 12 (P) Advanced Flying Unit. Loosing sight of the flair path at RAF Bottesford, Leicestershire, the aircraft crashed killing all three crew members.
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CWGC Grantham Cemetery - Grantham, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr
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SuffolkBlue

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 10/11/2019**

Postby SuffolkBlue on Sun 10 Nov 2019, 10:51 pm

Belton Park is located near the village of Londonthorpe, on the outskirts of Grantham. It was used as the site of a military camp during the First World War. A plan, dating to the summer of 1915, shows the layout of the camp including narrow gauge railways and a hospital. The camp was used by the British Army from April 1915 to house the 30th Division whilst it was being formed. The plan of the site is annotated with the names of the battalions that formed the division and shows where the different battalions were quartered. The 30th Division was made up almost entirely of battalions from Manchester and Liverpool and comprised volunteers who had enlisted soon after the start of the war in August 1914. The division moved on to Salisbury Plain in late September 1915 before embarking for France in November that year. Belton Park Camp then became the base depot and headquarters of the war raised Machine Gun Corps from October 1915, closing in 1922.

Belton’s military hospital was run by the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) and purpose built within the parkland. Similar in size and structure to hospitals close to the Western Front, it was built to care for men returning from active service. This hospital was the penultimate stop on a soldier’s journey home after being wounded on the front lines. However, given the size of the Belton Park Camp, the hospital was also kept busy with the medical needs of soldiers in training.

The RAMC doctors, supported by nurses and volunteers, were seeing patients at the very beginning of 1915. With several wards, operating rooms, an X-ray room and dispensary, this modern hospital could hold 670 patients at a time.

Those who lost their lives at Belton Park, either through training accidents or illness, are buried here in the local village church. In total, there are 32 listed casualties buried here.

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CWGC Londonthorpe (St. John The Baptist) Churchyard - Londonthorpe, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Londonthorpe (St. John The Baptist) Churchyard - Londonthorpe, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Londonthorpe (St. John The Baptist) Churchyard - Londonthorpe, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Londonthorpe (St. John The Baptist) Churchyard - Londonthorpe, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Londonthorpe (St. John The Baptist) Churchyard - Londonthorpe, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Londonthorpe (St. John The Baptist) Churchyard - Londonthorpe, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Londonthorpe (St. John The Baptist) Churchyard - Londonthorpe, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Londonthorpe (St. John The Baptist) Churchyard - Londonthorpe, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Londonthorpe (St. John The Baptist) Churchyard - Londonthorpe, Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr
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SuffolkBlue

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 14/11/2019**

Postby SuffolkBlue on Thu 14 Nov 2019, 8:57 pm

The Lincolnshire village of Manby is located just south-east of Louth, is a Royal Air Force Training Station. During the Second World War, when it was the home of No. 1 Air Armament chool, a section of the village churchyard was set aside for service burials. RAF Manby was operational from 1938 to 1974. Houses were built for RAF personnel with village streets named after aircraft. In the late 1980's, the administration site was sold for commercial use and it is now a business park and the former airfield has been returned to agriculture.

All save 1 of the casualties buried here are airmen, and 24 of the burials are in this small war graves plot. The total number of burials is 29.

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CWGC Manby (St. Mary) Churchyard - Manby, East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Handley Page Hampden I L4164 crashed in bad weather on approach to RAF Manby on the 9th October 1941. J Cehrzycki was killed in the crash of which there were no survivors.
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CWGC Manby (St. Mary) Churchyard - Manby, East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The crew of No.103 Sqn boarded Handley Page Halifax II W1218 at RAF Elsham Wolds, North Lincolshire on the 28th July 1942 to conduct training including gunnery over the North Sea. Their aircraft stalled and spun into the ground at Ludborough, near Louth, killing all of the 6 man crew, 4 of which are buried together here.
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CWGC Manby (St. Mary) Churchyard - Manby, East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Adrian Harold Cooper Gill of Palmerston North, Wellington, New Zealand, was a Wireless Operator / Gunner with 214 (Federated Malay States) Sqn, RNZAF.

On the 17th August 1942, he boarded Short Stirling I BF330 at RAF Stradishall, along with the rest of his crew, to attack Osnabruck, Germany.

Their aircraft was attacked by a German night fighter 30k north of the Dutch island of Terschelling and crashed into the North Sea. 2 of the 7 man crew have no known grave, with the bodies of the rest of the crew washing up on UK beaches.
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CWGC Manby (St. Mary) Churchyard - Manby, East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Manby (St. Mary) Churchyard - Manby, East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot L M A Green was killed on the 7th September 1942 when his Vickers Wellington I P9235 hit a hill 2 miles south east of Louth after takeoff.
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CWGC Manby (St. Mary) Churchyard - Manby, East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Donald Wormleighton & Wireless Operator Eric Frank Rawlings were part of a four man crew in Vickers Wellington IC R1463 that were conducting a night intruder mission on the 21st February 1942.

While descending through cloud in order to establish their position, the bomber crashed at 03:30 into a field at Asterby Top Farm, Goulceby, 7 miles SW of Louth, some 400 feet above sea level. The pilot had been cleared to descend to 900 feet through thick cloud and may have descended further in an attempt to see the ground or may have forgotten to adjust his altimeter pressure setting on return from operations, causing it to read higher than the correct altitude
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CWGC Manby (St. Mary) Churchyard - Manby, East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Handley Page Hampden I X2981 exploded and crashed over the Theddlethorpe bombing range on the 20th December 1940, killing both the crew members buried here side by side.
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CWGC Manby (St. Mary) Churchyard - Manby, East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Officer G W Winder was killed when Hawker Demon K8196 and Demon K5736 collided in mid air over the Donna Nook Ranges on the 24th February 1940.
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CWGC Manby (St. Mary) Churchyard - Manby, East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 28th October 1940, the crew of Handley Page HampdenX3027, No.49 Sqn, left RAF Scampton for Hamburg. On the outbound journey they were shot down by an Intruder (Lt.Volker, 1NJG2) and crashed into the sea off Skegness.

The body of P/O Ballas-Andersen was never found. He is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial. P/O J.R.Bufton KIA, P/O K.Ballas-Andersen KIA, Sgt R.F.Robertson KIA, Sgt F.J.W.Bichard KIA.
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CWGC Manby (St. Mary) Churchyard - Manby, East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

There is also a small post war grave plot in the churchyard.
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CWGC Manby (St. Mary) Churchyard - Manby, East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the night of the 27th August 1954 a Gloster Meteor Mk 8 from the RAF Flying College flown by W/Cmdr H A Conaghan crashed about 50 miles from Manby.
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CWGC Manby (St. Mary) Churchyard - Manby, East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Gloster Meteor T Mk 7 dived into a hill at Station Farm, East Halton, Lincolnshire, destroying a tractor. The crew did not abandon the aircraft and both were killed.

F/Sgt (1566237) William Henry BLACK AFM (pilot) RAF
W/Cdr (164.406) Francis Michael HEGARTY AFC & Bar (pilot)

The aircraft flew into rising ground but the reasons for this were never determined.The story at the time was that the sortie was one that included a test of the students asymmetric minims which could have gone horribly wrong.
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CWGC Manby (St. Mary) Churchyard - Manby, East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr
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SuffolkBlue

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 14/11/2019**

Postby SuffolkBlue on Tue 19 Nov 2019, 10:46 pm

Cleethorpes Cemetery contains 159 casualties from the First and Second World War. Of the 80 Second World War burials in the cemetery, 49 form a war graves plot.

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CWGC Cleethorpes Cemetery - Cleethorpes, North East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator Eric Hannath was on board Vickers Wellington IC DV739 from RAF Harwell for a training flight when an engine failed on take-off and the Wellington crashed close to the airfield, killing Eric and one other crew member.

He is buried here in his home town of Cleethorpes.
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CWGC Cleethorpes Cemetery - Cleethorpes, North East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The crew of Vickers Wellington X HE350 took off from RAF Skellingthorpe on the 20th September 1943 for air gunnery training. As the aircraft climbed out, both engines cut out. The pilot was unable to turn back and crash-landed 3 miles northwest of the airfield.

Of the crew of 5 (3 of which had the surname Baker), 3 were killed in the crash.

Robert Arthur Baker was posthumously awarded the D.F.C. on 16 November 1943
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CWGC Cleethorpes Cemetery - Cleethorpes, North East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cleethorpes Cemetery - Cleethorpes, North East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Seaman Arthur Priestley of HMS Altair died on the 13th June 1944 due to a short illness.
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CWGC Cleethorpes Cemetery - Cleethorpes, North East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 29th August 1943 29, the crew of Vickers Wellington III BK431 took off from RAF Bruntingthorpe for an air firing detail with staff captain and screened wireless operator, a gunnery instructor, an Air Training Corps cadet passenger and three trainee air gunners. Tragically, fifteen minutes after take off, the bolts securing the lower port wing spar failed due to metal fatigue and the aircraft hurtled into the ground near Oakham.

John Hawarth Heath of Napier, Hawke's Bay, New Zealand whose parents had originated from Lincolnshire, was taken to his birthplace and laid to rest here in Cleethorpes Cemetery.
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CWGC Cleethorpes Cemetery - Cleethorpes, North East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 3rd September 1940, the engine room on steamer SS Kildale took a direct hit from a Heinkel He111. All 6 of her engine room crew were killed and buried together here. She limped back to port and put back into active service.

On the 3rd November 1940 while sailing in the coastal Convoy WN-29 for the final part of her trip she was attacked by German aircraft off the coast of Aberdeen. After being bombed and raked with machine gun fire, the ship sank killing one of the 37 crew on board.
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CWGC Cleethorpes Cemetery - Cleethorpes, North East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cleethorpes Cemetery - Cleethorpes, North East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 31st March 1916, 5 Zeppelins set out to attack London and East Anglia, however as it approached England, Zeppelin L22, developed engine problems. Instead of heading for London it changed course for Grimsby docks. Shortly before 1 a.m on Saturday 1st April it crossed the east coast. As the Zeppelin passed over the vicinity, searchlights locked on to it and an anti-aircraft gun opened fire. The Zeppelin released some bombs which landed harmlessly in open countryside near Cleethorpes. It then headed out to sea, before turning round for a second attack.

Three further bombs were dropped. One landed in Sea View Street, shattering shop windows; a second destroyed the local council offices; while the third scored a direct hit on the Baptist Church Hall where men of the 3rd (Special Reserve) Battalion of the Manchester Regiment were billeted. Of the men in the building, 27 died instantly and 4 were fatally injured, dying soon after from their wounds. The majority of men were wounded but four men were rescued uninjured from a small cellar under the hall where they had been playing a game of cards. Due to reporting restrictions the Times reported it as occurring ‘in a village of no military significance’.
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CWGC Cleethorpes Cemetery - Cleethorpes, North East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cleethorpes Cemetery - Cleethorpes, North East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cleethorpes Cemetery - Cleethorpes, North East Lincolnshire, Friday 16th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

St. Andrew Churchyard in Immingham, North East Lincolnshire, contains 18 First World War burials and 5 from the Second World War.

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CWGC Immingham (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Immingham, North East Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Immingham (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Immingham, North East Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Immingham (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Immingham, North East Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

German 1st SG battlecruisers and 2nd SG light cruisers escorted by destroyers sailed to attack the Yorkshire coast on the 16th December 1914. Battlecruisers Seydlitz, Moltke and armoured cruiser Blücher were to bombard Hartlepool, battlecruisers Derfflinger and Von der Tann to bombard Scarborough then Whitby and light cruiser Kolberg to lay up to 100 mines off Flamborough Head. Both the German and British battlefleets were out in support of their forces.

Coming south in anticipation of this attack the seven 4th DF destroyers screening Adm Beatty's battlecruisers - Lynx, Ambuscade, Unity, Hardy of 1st Div and Shark, Acasta, Spitfire of 2nd Div, met destroyers from the German light cruiser screen in the Dogger Bank area. When challenged, they opened fire damaging Lynx and Ambuscade, the remaining destroyers then sighted cruiser Hamburg close by at 05:53. Hardy and Shark opened fire with Hardy damaged by the cruiser.

Battle report from HMS Hardy : "Wireless shot away, holed on waterline, bridge wrecked, severely damaged by 0600 with steering gear disabled and had to turn out of line, managed to proceed at 0620 and limped into port escorted by Spitfire"

Two crewmen lost their lives and are buried here side by side.
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CWGC Immingham (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Immingham, North East Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Immingham (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Immingham, North East Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

HMS Meteor was a Thornycroft M-class destroyer that served in the Royal Navy. Meteor saw extensive service throughout World War I, maintaining continuous operations both as a convoy escort and in harbour protection.

Meteor served with the Harwich Force from 1914–1917.

On the 23rd January 1915, the German battlecruisers under Admiral Franz von Hipper made a sortie to attack British fishing boats on the Dogger Bank. British Naval Intelligence was warned of the raid by radio messages and sent out the Battlecruiser Force from Rosyth, commanded by Admiral Beatty aboard HMS Lion and the Harwich Force, commanded by Commodore Reginald Tyrwhitt aboard the light cruiser Arethusa were sent out to intercept the German force. Meteor was one of seven M-class destroyers sailing with the Harwich Force. The British and German Forces met on the morning of the 24th January in the Battle of Dogger Bank. On sighting the British, Hipper ordered his ships to head south-east to escape them, who set off in pursuit. Being the fastest destroyers available to the British, the seven M-class were sent ahead to report the strength of the German forces.

Although briefly forced to turn away by fire from the armoured cruiser Blücher, they managed to successfully report the German's strength and course before being ordered to pull back and take up station ahead of the British line as Beatty's battlecruisers came into gun range of the German ships.

At about 09:20, German destroyers appeared to be preparing a torpedo attack, and the British destroyers were ordered ahead of the line in order to prevent such an attack. Only the M-class destroyers had sufficient speed to respond and slowly draw ahead of the British battlecruisers, but no attack by German destroyers followed. Later, at about 11:00, an emergency turn to avoid a non-existent German submarine and misinterpretation of signals from Lion caused the British battlecruisers to concentrate on Blücher, already badly damaged and trailing well behind the other German ships, and allowing the rest of Hipper's fleet to escape. Meteor led three other destroyers in a torpedo attack against Blücher but was hit by a shell in the forward boiler room which knocked her out of action, killing four and wounding two. Blücher was eventually overwhelmed by British shells and torpedoes, sinking at 12:10, while Meteor was towed back to the Humber by the destroyer Liberty.

Meteor continued to carry out minelaying operations for the rest of the war, laying magnetic mines off Ostend during August 1918. In total, Meteor laid 1082 mines during the First World War.

The destroyer was sold for scrapping in May 1921.
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CWGC Immingham (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Immingham, North East Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 27th November 1915, the boiler of HMS Albatross exploded, killing three of her crew :

BAYS, John W, Stoker, RNR, V 752

ELLIOTT, Alfred E, Leading Stoker, K 4555

HAM, Philip, Chief Stoker, 288247
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CWGC Immingham (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Immingham, North East Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

HMS Chester was a Town-class light cruiser of the Royal Navy, one of two ships forming the Birkenhead subtype. Along with sister ship, Birkenhead, she was originally ordered for the Greek Navy in 1914 and was to be named Lambros Katsonis. The order was placed with Cammell Laird and production continued for the Greek account after the outbreak of the First World War in August 1914. In 1915 the two cruisers were purchased by the British government. She fought at the Battle of Jutland where casualties included John 'Jack' Cornwell who was awarded the highest honour, aged 16.

Charles Blaydon was serving on Chester during the battle and died a month later. I can only assume that he suffered wounds during the battle and passed away back on home soil.
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CWGC Immingham (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Immingham, North East Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Immingham (St. Andrew) Churchyard - Immingham, North East Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

There are a number of burials within Scunthorpe Cemetery, some of which make up a small war grave plot.
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CWGC Scunthorpe (Crosby) Cemetery - Scunthrope, North Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Scunthorpe (Crosby) Cemetery - Scunthrope, North Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Scunthorpe (Crosby) Cemetery - Scunthrope, North Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Scunthorpe (Crosby) Cemetery - Scunthrope, North Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Scunthorpe (Crosby) Cemetery - Scunthrope, North Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr

This was the last location I visited on the first day of my trip around Lincolnshire and as I was staying over just down the road from the Humber Bridge, I thought it would be rude not to finish the day by having a stroll by the river.
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Humber Bridge - Barton-upon-Humber, North Lincolnshire, Thursday 15th August 2019 by Chris Day, on Flickr
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