CWGC Cemeteries **updated 25/05/2021**

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SuffolkBlue
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Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 23/07/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

RAF Harwell is a former Royal Air Force station, near the village of Harwell, located 5 miles south east of Wantage, Oxfordshire.

The airfield was built by John Laing & Son at the junction of three parishes in 1935. The bulk lay within Chilton parish; about a third was in East Hendred; and the smallest portion was in Harwell. The first Commanding Officer, upon being asked what the name of the new airfield should be, responded that it should be named after the parish in which his house lay – and this happened to be Harwell.

From its opening in February 1937 until March 1944, various bomber squadrons were stationed at the airfield. On the outbreak of the Second World War, it became part of No. 38 Group RAF, initially used leaflet missions over France using Vickers Wellington bombers, later bombing raids on Bremen, Cologne and Essen. There were numerous Luftwaffe raids on the airfield from August 1940 until September 1941. The original grass field was replaced with concrete runways between July and November 1941.

The following squadrons were posted to Harwell:

No. 75 Squadron RAF.
No. 105 Squadron RAF.
No. 107 Squadron RAF.
No. 148 Squadron RAF.
No. 215 Squadron RAF.
No. 226 Squadron RAF.
No. 295 Squadron RAF.
No. 570 Squadron RAF.

In March 1944, it was reallocated to 30 Group Airborne Forces, where it mainly operated tug aircraft towing Airspeed Horsa gliders. These gliders were used in a number of operations including carrying troops into Normandy to secure vital strategic positions in advance of the main landings on D-Day. In fact the first glider-borne troops to arrive in Normandy on D-Day came from RAF Harwell. A memorial to the men who flew from RAF Harwell who were killed on this operation now exists at one edge of the old airfield site, and a memorial service is held there annually. The airfield was also used briefly for Special Operations Executive (SOE) operations between July and September 1944.

The RAF station was closed at the end of 1945 and the site transferred to the Ministry of Supply on the 1st January 1946, where it became the Atomic Energy Research Establishment. Over the years that reduced in scale and other science-based research moved in, such as the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in 1957. The site is now home to the Harwell Science and Innovation Campus.

CWGC Harwell Cemetery contains 66 Second World War burials, most of them forming a war graves plot, the majority of them made from the station. There is also one First World War burial in the cemetery, and one non-war service grave.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 28th November 1939, Wireless Operator Frederick Challenger Overall was on board Avro Anson I N5084 on a night time training mission from RAF Harwell when it crashed onto Exmoor, killing all five crew members.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Robert Andrew McConnochie and 2nd pilot Harry Maynard Walsh were part of a five man crew of Vickers Wellington IC Z8354 that were tasked with an Overseas Aircraft Delivery Unit flight for Malta via Gibraltar. They took off from RAF Harwell on the 23rd September 1941 but soon after, the port engine failed and the aircraft crashed into Jarn Mound of Boar's Hill trying to land at RAF Abingdon. All on board were killed.

The crash made the national press when a young German man who was living nearby filmed the wreckage and was arrested for spying and deported.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The crew of Vickers Wellington I, L4259, took off from RAF Hampstead Norris, Berkshire, on the 17th October 1940 on a training mission. While on circuits over the airfield, the port engine burst into flames. The aircraft stalled and dived into the ground. Pilot Wynton Scott Munday and Pilot George Thomas Watt both lost their lives.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

While on a training mission, Vickers Wellington IC HF855 overshot on landing at RAF Harwell and crashed into a field on the 26th April 1942. All six crew members were killed with three buried together here.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 25th August 1942, Vickers Wellington IC DV595 took off from RAF Harwell for a night time training mission. While flying over the Odstone ranges, Leicestershire, it collided with Wellington IC N2755.

DV595 came down with the loss of all on board, who are buried here. The pilot of N2775 from RAF Hampstead Norris regained control to make a single engine crash landing at RAF Stanton Harcourt.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Vickers Wellington IC N2808 stalled while avoiding tree & crashed near Wantage on the 17th October 1941. The crew were on a training mission from RAF Harwell at the time of the accident, with all on board killed.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Carl Alexis Bergsten of Far Hills, New Jersey, U.S.A, was part of a six man crew on a ferry flight from RAF Harwell to Gibraltar on the 25th October 1941. Vickers Wellington IC X9989 failed to gain height after taking off due to a faulty hydraulic system and crashed at Aldworth, Berkshire. All of the crew on board lost their lives.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Just after taking off RAF Harwell for a training mission on the 5th December 1942, the starboard engine on Vickers Wellington IC DV724 cut out. Before the crew could return to base the Wellington stalled and crashed at 21:12hrs in trees near Ardington, 2 miles from Wantage Berkshire.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The crew of Vickers Wellington IC HF906 boarded their aircraft at RAF Hampstead Norris for a training mission on the 3rd March 1943.

Not long after departure, the wireless equipment failed and the exercise was aborted. At around 20:30hrs, the Wellington was reported on approach to land, but this was abandoned in favour of another aircraft in the circuit. While so engaged, the bomber stalled from 100ft and smashed into The Bungalow, Common Barn Farmhouse, near Newbury, Berkshire, killing the crew.

The 2 occupants of the bungalow were also killed. Miss Playle was a nurse companion to Mrs Chiverton. They were aged 60 and 68 respectively.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Aircraftwoman 1st Class Kathleen Florence Seacole died on the 21st July 1942 of tuberculosis at the age of 22 years at the sanatorium near Henley.

Her parents, Joseph and Elsie Seacole lived at The Orchard, Wantage Road, Harwell.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 23/07/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

During the Second World War, RAF Benson used the St. Helen Churchyard Extension, for crew lost flying from the airfield and the local area. CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension has 32 casualties buried here.

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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The crew of Vickers Wellington IC took off from RAF Mount Farm on the 18th April 1941 for circuit training over the airfield. Whilst trying to overshoot the runway, the aircraft lost power, stalled and crashed at 00:58hrs, hitting the corner of a farm building at Watlington, Oxfordshire.

Pilot Thomas Mackintosh Couper of Toronto, Ontario, Canada and one other crew member were killed.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Navigator Merton Lambert Horfield Rose was on board de Havilland Mosquito PR Mk IX LR407 when the engine cut and the aircraft stalled on approach to RAF Benson on the 8th January 1944. He and the pilot were both killed in the subsequent crash.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 26th November 1940, Navigator Antoni Henryk Ignaszak boarded Fairey Battle I L5071 at RAF Mount Farm for a training mission. The aircraft climbed to 1,000ft but then dived and crashed one mile north-west of airfield and burst into flames.

Two other crew members were also killed.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Sergeant Nicholas William Cantwell of Galway, Irish Republic, was killed while on leave in Euston Road, London, during an air raid on the city on the 20th September 1940.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

During the height of the Battle of France, Fairey Battle I K9374 took off from Bétheniville in North East France on the 14th May 1940 to attack German columns. Pilot Charles David Perry was hit by flak and the aircraft was badly damaged. Although severely wounded in the thigh and stomach he was able to fly the aircraft back to the vicinity of the airfield and crash land near Cauroy. He was immediately evacuated to England but sadly died in hospital on the 14th June 1940. He was awarded a DFM for his bravery.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Fairey Battle I L5079 crashed at Streatley, Reading, due to engine failure on the 30th September 1940. The pilot, Otakar Odstrcilek, who was on his first solo training mission from RAF Benson, was killed.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator / Air Gunner Maurice Vivian Everitt and his two crew members were killed on the 24th July 1940 when their Fairey Battle I L5482 hit high-tension cables and crashed near North Stoke, Oxfordshire when on a navigation exercise from RAF Benson.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Duncan Darrock Dunlop took off from RAF Chipping Warden at 09:30hrs for a training flight in Vickers Wellington IC Z8964 on the 4th June 1942. Forty minutes later, the aircraft flew into trees at Henley on Thames, Oxfordshire, killing all on board.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Observer Cyril Clifford Henderson was mortally injured at St. Pancras, London, an area badly hit during a bombing raid on the 19th September 1940. He died the next day.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 6th August 1940, Pilot 'Bricky' Arthur Vivian Fisher took off at 23:15hrs in Fairey Battle I L4943 on a solo night flight training exercise from RAF Benson. Shortly afterwards whilst climbing to 800 - 1000 ft, the aircraft was seen to swing to starboard then to port before flying into the ground and catching fire at Watlington.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Corporal Norman Grenville Jones was killed on 31st March 1941 as a result of enemy action at Mount Farm Satellite, Dorchester-on-Thames.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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SuffolkBlue
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Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 23/07/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

At the outbreak of the Second World War, RAF Upper Heyford, in Oxfordshire, was the home to units of RAF Bomber Command, specifically No. 18 and No. 57 (Bombing) Squadrons, forming No. 70 (Bomber) Wing of No. 2 (Bombing) Group. In response to what was perceived as a growing worldwide threat, Strategic Air Command decided to house a strong force of American bomber aircraft in England. It was decided to convert four airfields in and around Oxfordshire to serve as their regular stations. Upper Heyford was one of those selected, the others being RAF Brize Norton, RAF Fairford and RAF Greenham Common.

With the end of the Cold War, the presence of the 20th TFW was deemed no longer necessary in the United Kingdom and the USAF presence at RAF Upper Heyford was gradually run down. On the 15th December 1993 the flight line at RAF Upper Heyford was closed.

CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery came into use around 1920, when the churchyard ceased to be used for burials. It lies east of the churchyard, from which it is separated by a road. During the early part of the Second World War ground, in the south-western corner was set aside for service war burials and was used by the airfield.

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CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery - Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 17th September 1992, Capt. Jerry Lindh and Maj. David “Mike” McGuire were part of the 2 man crew in General Dynamics F-111E 68-0052, 55th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 20th Tactical Fighter Squadron, United States Air Force.

Their aircraft crashed on landing at runway 09, RAF Upper Heyford Runway 09. The module had been damaged in the initial ground impact, and subsequently did not achieve sufficient altitude to permit proper parachute deployment.

According to an eyewitness report:

"I was there-- we were having my going-away luncheon at the Three Horseshoes when the planes were coming in that day. Being a communicator, I'm not up to speed on all of the aviator terms, but I'll do my best to describe what I witnessed that afternoon.

The pub, which you know sits at the west end of Camp Road, is within rock-throwing distance of the runway, though we preferred to throw rocks at the peace campers. A few of us were outside and away from the main group recounting my "war" stories when the planes were coming in for the day.

It was a typical day in the armpit of USAFE. A couple of pints, rattled teeth, and an F111 enhanced hangover headache. At least until the last plane came in on approach-- my supervisor remarked, "that doesn't sound healthy!"

Our attention was focused a little north of the village proper (Upper Heyford) on the plane coming in about 200 feet off of the ground. The jet was making a horrible sputtering noise and looked to barely be in control-- I can only describe it as a wobbly wing-flapping with the wing tips alternatively going +/- 25-30 degrees with the right wing dipping furthest.

Just after clearing the road that skirts the village (Somerset Road, I think), and about 100 feet in the air, the plane rolled almost 150 degrees to the right going almost fully inverted. There was a small explosion less than 2 seconds before the plane went in just over the perimeter fence and impacted in a field just south of the runway. It appeared to us that the crew ejection capsule had shot straight into the ground.

We were later told by a friend in the RAPCON that the pilot reported a total hydraulic failure during the approach pattern. Upon their capsule's impact; one of the men died on impact, the other died a few hours later in the base hospital.
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CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery - Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Handley Page Hampden I P4301 hit trees and crashed near Charlton whilst trying to land at RAF Croughton on the 24th October 1941.

Pilot James Cornelius Hill and Wireless Operator / Air Gunner Robert Charles Dillon Jones were two of the four man crew who lost their lives.
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CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery - Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 20th September 1941, Pilot Nicholaas Petrus van der Merwe & Air Gunner Robert Legas were part of a four man crew in Handley Page Hampden I P5314 that took off from RAF Croughton on a night flying exercise.

As the aircraft was landing, it was shot down by a Junkers Ju88 intruder, with all four crew killed.
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CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery - Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Observer Jack Kenneth Howe was killed on the 29th September 1941 when his Handley Page Hampden I P5308 crashed into a hillside at Piddington, Oxfordshire, while on a bombing practice mission from RAF Upper Heyford.
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CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery - Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Bomb Aimer / Navigator Brian William Miller was killed, along with the rest of his crew, on the 10th October 1941. They got airborne from RAF Upper Heyford in Handley Page Hampden I P4319 for a night bombing exercise when their aircraft crashed.
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CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery - Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Joseph Jossie Goldman of Bloemfontein, Orange Free State, South Africa, was killed on the 19th June 1941 when his Handley Page Hampden I AD831 crashed hear RAF Upper Heyford on a training mission.
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CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery - Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 11th July 1941, the four man crew of Handley Page Hampden I AD849 took off for a training flight from RAF Upper Heyford. Their aircraft dived and crashed at Home Farm, Rousham,after take-off and it is believed the pilot struck his head and became unconscious. The crew are buried here together.
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CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery - Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

U/T Pilot Douglas Harry Montague Barrat lost his life on the 21st February 1941 when his Miles Master N7673 crashed near Banbury, Oxfordshire
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CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery - Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 7th February 1941, Handley Page Hampden I P1149 took off from RAF Upper Heyford on a daytime training mission. It immediately flew into another of the unit's aircraft (Hampden P1302), which was in the process of landing. Locked together, the two aircraft fell onto the airfield, where they began to burn.

Wireless Operator Harry James lost his life in P1149.
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CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery - Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 28/07/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground was opened in November, 1940, and was used by the service personnel at nearby RAF Kidlington (now Oxford Airport).

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CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

U/T Flight Engineer Andrew Paton was killed whilst flying in Airrspeed Oxford I LX322 of No 2 (O) AFU, when it crashed in a flat spin near Rousham, Oxfordshire, on the 25th April 1944.
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CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Leo Albert Boire was born in Napierville, Monteregie Region, Quebec, Canada on the 8th January 1923. He joined the Royal Canadian Air Force, sent to England and was based at RAF Weston on the Green, Oxfordshire.

He was killed on a night flying exercise when his Airspeed Oxford was involved in mid-air collision on the 3rd June 1943 near Kingston Bagpuize.
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CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Following his training in Canada, Pilot Officer Jack Standish Banks was overseas in December 1940 and flew with to 75 Squadron, 214 Squadron and No 9 RAF Squadron. He completed thirty-one sorties as an air gunner and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal on the 13th April 1942

He received his Pilot Flying Badge on the 5th February 1943 and was assigned to 20(P) AFU on the 5th May 1943.

On the 3rd June 1943 while on active service at RAF Kidlington, he was a passenger in an Airspeed Oxford V3821 that was involved in a mid-air collision with another Oxford. Both planes spun into the ground and burst into flames and were completely destroyed.
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CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 27th June 1943, Airspeed Oxford HN578 took off at 00:50 hrs on a solo non operational flight detailed to practice instrument flying. The aircraft was due back at 02:05 hrs, but had not returned by 05:00 hrs. At 06:00 hrs, 3 aircraft searched without success. The aircraft had crashed at 01:00 hrs north of Tackley Airfield and the pilot, Flight Sergeant Langley, had been killed.
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CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Robert Leroy Keniston was killed whilst flying in de Havilland Tiger Moth II, T7190 of No 101 GOTU, when it flew into the ground at Islip in Oxfordshire, on the 2nd April 1942.
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CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Albert Farish Jackson was killed on the 26th July 1942 when his General Aircraft Hotspur II, BT685 of No 2 GTS, crashed after the tail broke off shortly after release from the tug.
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CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Zenon Slomkowski was serving with 2 AGS when died from natural causes in Hospital in Perth, Scotland, on the 30th November 1942. H
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CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

U/T Pilot Leading Aircraftman Leigh Brereton Sadleir Falkiner was killed whilst flying in Airspeed Oxford I, V3906 of No 15 SFTS, when it crashed after hitting HT cables near Bicester, on the 12th February 1942.
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CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

U/T Pilot Colin Paget Blair was killed whilst flying Airspeed Oxford II, W6629 of No 15 SFTS, which was shot down near Weston-on-the-Green in Oxfordshire by an intruder on the 13th August 1941.Image
CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 28/07/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

During the First World War, the 3rd Southern General Hospital (an Oxfordshire Territorial Unit) was housed in the Examination Schools and a number of other buildings in Oxford. CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery contains 156 burials from the First World War, all in the war graves plot in section I/1. The cemetery was designated a Royal Air Force regional cemetery during the Second World War and was used by RAF stations in Berkshire and neighbouring counties. Practically all of the 516 Second World War burials (one of them unidentified) are in the war graves plot, which was extended from the section used during the First World War. In addition to the Commonwealth war graves,the cemetery contains almost 70 war graves of other nationalities.

At 730 casualties, it's the largest CWGC site in Oxfordshire.

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 24th April 1945, the crew of Avro Lancaster I, PD339, took off RAF Wing, Buckinghamshire at 16:40hrs. 15 minutes later, south of Northampton, their aircraft hit a tree while turning steeply to avoid cables, crashed and burned out on Hardingstone Lodge Farm. Of the seven crew only the two RAF air gunners survived, injured. The four RNZAF airmen were buried here on the 2nd May 1945. They were taking part in Operation Exodus, which involved a large scale airlift to repatriate some 75,000 recently liberated British prisoners of war from continental airfields to Britain. Lost on the first day of the 12-day operation, it is believed that PD339 was returning to its base after transporting one of the first batches of prisoners from Brussels to RAF Wing.

Air Bomber Ralph Franklin Carrodus and Pilot Cedric John Evans are two of the crew buried side by side.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Air Gunner RAF Gordon John Symonds was killed on 8th April 1945 when his Avro Lancaster HK788 caught fire shortly after take off on a mission to bomb Germany. The aircraft was diverted to RAF Abingdon but crashed 4-miles short of the airfield and exploded.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Short Stirling I, R9249, crashed while attempting a three-engine landing at RAF Chipping Warden, Northamptonshire, on the 22nd October 1943 while on a special navigation exercise from RAF Stradishall, Suffolk. The visibility was poor and it is assumed that the crew mistook one of the perimeter tracks for the runway. The aircraft clipped a tree and two houses as it came in.

Air Gunner Gregory Terence Duane died the next day from his injuries.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 15th February 1944, the four man crew of North American Mitchell II, FL194, took off from RAF Bicester, Oxforshire, for a training flight.
For unknown reasons, the aircraft crashed bear Buckingham, killing all on board, including Pilot Henri Jean Boots.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 21st June 1944, the crew of Short Stirling III EH940 were on a training mission from RAF Winthorpe when an engine burst into flames and the aircraft crashed at Kettlethorpe, near Lincoln, with the subsequent fire destroying several farm buildings.

Air Gunner William Henry Miller and four crew members were killed.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Armstrong Whitworth Whitley V BD271 took off from RAF Stanton Harcourt at 23:00hrs on the 9th April 1944 and detailed to carry out a cross country training flight. It is thought that structural failure occurred at around 02:10 hrs and the Whitley dived into the ground and burst into flames at White House Farm, Brightwell, 2 miles West of Wallingford, Oxfordshire. There were no survivors.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Armstrong Whitworth Whitley V T4337 crashed within a minute of takeoff from RAF Abingdon, onto Bessells Leigh firing range, on the 14th March 1944.
Navigator Allan Gainford Lillicoof Britannia Bay, Ontario, Canada, was killed in the crash.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator / Gunner Bernard Thomas Scammell DFM and the rest of the crew of Armstrong Whitworth Whitley V BD281 boarded their aircraft at RAF Abingdon on the 24th June 1943.

They were tasked to participate in Exercise Tucker, an army cooperation exercise involving no. 685 Amphibious Warfare Company, Royal Engineers.

Hi aircraft dived to near ground level in a mock attack on a bridge but whilst climbing away the port wing struck a tall tree. Out of control, the bomber crashed at Tythrop House, around 6 miles from Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire.

There were no survivors.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 14th November 1943, the crew of Armstrong Whitworth Whitley V AD688 took off from RAF Abingdon for a training mission. The pitot head tube iced up while at 13.500ft and at 3,000ft, control was lost & the order to bale out followed. Two crew members managed to get clear before it hit the ground & burst into flames. Air Gunner Henry Peter Gordon Harbour and three crew members were killed.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 28th November 1943, Vickers Wellington III, X3923, took off from RAF Upper Heyford for on a training mission, during which it collided with another Wellington. Debris from the 2 machines was scattered in the area of Baynard's Green on the north east side of the airfield.

Navigator George Alfred Harding Stevens DFC lost his life in X3923.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Mabel Murray served as a Staff Nurse at the 3rd Southern General Hospital and died in Oxford on the 2nd November 1918 at the age of 35 of pneumonia following influenza.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 5th March 1945, Avro Lancaster III PB475 took off at 17:33 hours from RAF Little Staughton, Bedfordshire. Their mission was to Chemnitz as part of the continuation of Operation Thunderclap. 760 aircraft were involved and severe icing conditions over home bases cost 9 aircraft, especially from 426 Sqn. A further 22 aircraft were lost on the operation. The centre and south of the city were badly damaged by fire and several important factories were destroyed, including the Siegmar tank engine plant.

It was returning from the raid when a hung up target indicator ignited in the bomb bay . Records state it came down near Bellingdon, 2 miles north-west of Chesham, Buckinghamshire at 01:00 hours, sadly six of the crew were killed with only the rear gunner survived by bailing out:

Flying Officer J.C.Gould - KIA
Sgt A. Denbigh - KIA
Flt Sgt R.F.Barnett RAAF - KIA
W/O G.Torr RAAF - KIA
W/O E.W. Hemsworth RAAF - KIA
Sgt G.J.P.Ralph - KIA
Sgt Bill Hart - tail gunner, thrown clear of wreckage, survived
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr


Navigator Keith Stanley Franz Allen of Dulwich Hill, New South Wales, Australia, boarded Vickers Wellington III BJ909 at RAF Bruntingthorpe, Leicestershire, on the 5th January 1945 for a training flight.

His aircraft crashed while attempting to land back at the airfield, killing him and 4 other crew members.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator / Air Gunner Richard Ludgvan Staples was on board Avro Lancaster III JB125 when it crashed in poor visibility at Hoveringham, near Newark-on-Trent, on the 12th Janaury 1945 when on a training flight.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wing Commander Gerard Arthur Lewin Sinclair-Hill OBE was a passenger in Percival Proctor III HM324, when it crashed near Hargatewall, Buxton, on the 5th March 1945.

The crash occurred while the aircraft was flying in low cloud and records state that the pilot may have been attempting to break through the cloud trying to pinpoint his position when the aircraft struck the top of a hill, the wreck was not discovered for 24 hours due to the poor weather. The aircraft was based at RAF Hendon in North London, though its destination on the day the crash is unknown.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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SuffolkBlue
Posts: 1390
Joined: Sun 31 Aug 2008, 7:31 pm
Location: Bury St. Edmunds

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 28/07/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

CWGC Greenwich Cemetery contains 561 First World War burials. More than half of these graves are scattered throughout the cemetery, but 263 form a large war graves plot known as 'Heroes' Corner'. Here, two curved screen walls bear the names of casualties buried both in the plot and in unmarked graves in the cemetery.

The Second World War plot adjoins and contains 75 graves. An additional screen wall commemorates casualties buried in this plot and ten others buried in unmarked graves elsewhere in the cemetery. In all, the cemetery contains 124 Second World War burials, 3 of which are unidentified British soldiers.

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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

U/T Pilot Albert George Frederick Moye was killed on the 12th September 1941 whilst flying in Airspeed Oxford I, V3980 of No 15 SFTS, when it collided with de Havilland Tiger Moth, T6432 of No 6 EFTS near Sywell.
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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Section E contains a plot of 30 Norwegian service graves from the Second World War.
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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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SuffolkBlue
Posts: 1390
Joined: Sun 31 Aug 2008, 7:31 pm
Location: Bury St. Edmunds

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 13/08/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

RAF East Wretham, near Thetford, Norfolk, was hurriedly brought into service during the early years of World War II as a satellite airfield with No. 311 (Czech) Squadron dispersed there from RAF Honington on the 29th July 1940. The squadron operated their bombers from the airfield until April 1942 when it transferred to Coastal Command. Later, RAF Bomber Command No. 115 Squadron RAF, operating Vickers Wellington Mk IIIs and later Avro Lancasters, occupied the airfield from November 1942.

A plan to turn East Wretham into a "Class A" airfield was not carried through, the bomber unit moved to Little Snoring and the station turned over to the USAAF for fighter operations.

Initially after the war ended, the field was used by the RAF as a Polish resettlement camp. With the refugees resettled by 1946, East Wretham was closed as an active airfield and became part of the British Army's Stanford Practical Training Area (also known as STANTA). This huge training area in Norfolk has facilities for the live firing of artillery, mortars, anti-tank and machine guns as well as for dry training and bivouacking. Tanks are used during restricted periods from July to September. There are also facilities for parachuting, air-to-ground attacks and other training involving aircraft.

Many of the original World War II airfield buildings still stand, including one of the T2 hangars.

Land in the villages CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard was set aside for the Czech airmen who lost their lives serving from the nearby airfield.

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Private Mieczyslaw Sieprawski of the Polish Resettlement Corps died on the 23rd October 1946. He was buried at the time in West Tofts (St. Mary) Churchyard, which is now in the Stanford Training Area and cannot be visited.
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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The all Czech crew of Vickers Wellington IC P9299 boarded their aircraft at RAF East Wretham for a daytime cross-country exercise on the 6th April 1942.
Flying low in bad weather, they entered a valley and suddenly confronted by rising ground. Unable to climb or turn to safety, the aircraft crashed on Bryn Uchat, near Llanymawddwy.
All 5 of the crew were killed.
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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 25th May 1941, Vickers Wellington IA N3010 crashed near RAF Langham, Norfolk, after it climbed erratically and stalled, bursting into flames on impact. The 4 crew members all lost their lives in the crash.
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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Ground crew member Jan Bambusek was killed on the 4th Aprl 1942 in a motorcycle crash resulting from a bomb explosion in the immediate vicinity.
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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The crew 311 (Czechoslovak) Squadron boarded their Vickers Wellington I, Z1147, at RAF East Wretham on the 3rd March 1942 for a raid on Emden.

During the mission, they were attacked by Oberfeldwebel Paul Gildner from II/NJG2 who was repelled twice, but during the third attack, Air Gunner Frantisek Binder was seriously wounded in the stomach and head. He died on the return leg and the aircraft made a safe return to East Wretham.
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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr


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SuffolkBlue
Posts: 1390
Joined: Sun 31 Aug 2008, 7:31 pm
Location: Bury St. Edmunds

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 22/09/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

RAF Bircham Newton is a former Royal Air Force station around 10 miles east of Kings Lynn. The site was first used during the First World War and received the largest British bomber of the time, the Handley Page V/1500. They would have carried out bombing missions against Berlin but the Armistice was arranged before any missions were actually flown. The airfield was equipped with one aircraft repair shed and three double bay general service sheds, although these had been demolished by 1937. It had two Belfast hangars, three C Type hangars, three Bellman hangars and ten Blister hangars.

It operated through the Second World War as part of No. 16 Group RAF as part of Coastal Command. No. 206 Squadron RAF was one of the squadrons being based there, on maritime patrol duties. Two satellite airfields, RAF Docking and RAF Langham were opened to accommodate units. In 1965 the airfield was used for evaluation trials of the Hawker Siddeley Kestrel V/STOL aircraft.

After closure as an operational airfield in 1966, the airfield became the home of the Construction Industry Training Board. The area of the airfield once occupied by the grass runways has disappeared under the activities of construction equipment, but the majority of buildings on the site remain in use by the CITB. The control tower was demolished in 2010 due to its poor condition.

The church and churchyard in the nearby villiage of Great Bircham are part of the Royal Estate at Sandringham. During the Second World War, the churchyard was used for the burial of airmen from RAF Bircham Newton, service dead whose bodies were washed up by the sea and German airmen brought down.. A special plot in the South-Eastern corner was set aside soon after the outbreak of war, primarily for men from the RAF station, but all save one of the war graves are in this war Graves Plot.

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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

German war grave plot
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Heinrich Kascher was an air gunner crew member on a Dornier Do 17Z-3 bomber from No 6 Staffel (Squadron) of Kampfgeschwader (Bomber Group) 3. His aircraft was attacked and shot down over Burnham Market, crashing in to the sea off Scolt Head, Brancaster Roads, at 12.35hrs on the 21st August 1940. The 3 Spitfires of No 611 Sqn RAF were flown by Pilot Officer's Watkins, J.W. Lund and M.P. Brown from RAF Digby.

The crew of 4 of the Dornier were killed. Heinrich Kaschers' body was washed ashore at Brancaster on the 23rd August 1940, which is the date that appears on his headstone.

The other 3 crew members were also found. Pilot Oberfw. W.Stolle and Observer Lt.H.Krüger were washed ashore and buried at Catton Churchyard in Norwich,and Oberfw. E.Kotulla was recovered from the Sea and buried in Holy Trinity Churchyard at West Runton.

After the War, all three were reburied at the Soldatenfriedhof German War Cemetery at Cannock Chase, Staffs. leaving only Heinrich Kaschner buried close to the site of the crash.

This German aircraft was one of a formation of three raiders which attacked East Anglia that day. The other two raiders escaped this engagement but were attacked near Mablethorpe in Lincolnshire by a section of 3 spitfires (led by S/L McComb) also from 611 Sqn. During these two engagements 4 of the Spitfires were damaged by enemy fire, although not fatally. The two German aircraft collided and crashed into the sea.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Unteroffizier Karl Lessmöllman was a crew member on Junkers Ju 88A-5 F6+BM that was shot down into the sea off Skegness at 10.13hrs on the 8th March 1941, by Spitfires of No 266 Sqn, RAF Wittering. The date on his headstone, 27th April 1941, is presumed to be that on which his body was recovered from the Sea. The pilot of Spitfire X4954 flown by Flying Officer Frederick Ferris, aged 27, was shot down and killed during this engagement.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Unteroffizier Helmut Seidel was a crew member of Heinkel He 111H-3 bomber V4+HK of 2/KG when it was shot down into the sea one and a half miles off Ingoldmells Point, near Skegness, at 10.00hrs on the 15th March 1941, by Bristol Beaufighter R2250 of No 29 Sqn RAF, flow by Guy Gibson DFC and Sgt R.H. James. The crew of 3 were all killed.

The date on Helmut Seidels' headstone, 2nd June 1941, is that on which his body was washed ashore.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Oberleutnant Gunther Trukenbrodt, Unteroffizier Walther Horst & Unteroffizier Paul Weber were all crew members of Heinkel He 111H-5 5J+FS, based at Leeuwarden, Holland, when their aircraft was attacked and damaged by Beaufighter R2157 of No 25 Sqn over the Wash in the early hours of the 5th June 1941, by Beaufighter R2157 of No 25 Sqn. They baled out over the sea and but drowned.

The body of Fw Heuser, the 4th crew member to bail out, was never recovered.

Their damaged aircraft was successfully belly-landed by its pilot Oberleutnant Pass at South Reston, Alford, Lincs, at 02.00hrs, just missing a pond near the village in the process.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Unteroffizier Jakob Ried was the radio operator on Junkers Ju 88C-4 R4+AM) of 4/NJG2 when it was shot down over Wingland Marsh, near King's Lynn, at 01.00hrs on the 14th June 1941, by Bristol Beaufighter R2157 of 25 Sqn. He baled out, but his parachute failed to open and his body was not recovered until the 7th July 1941, which is the date inscribed on his headstone.

A fellow crew member (Fw H. Schulz) was killed when the aircraft crashed on the mud flats 2 miles out from the sea bank and is buried in the Churchyard at Sutton Bridge, Lincs. The body of the 3rd crew member, Uffz. H.Bähner was never found.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Heinkel He 111H-5, F8+BS, of 8/KG40, which was shot down into the sea off Wells-next-Sea, Norfolk at 22.05hrs on the 22nd August 1941 by Bristol Beaufighter of No 604 Sqn. crewed by Wing Commander J. "Cats Eyes" Cunningham DSO, DFC & Bar and Pilot Officer C.F. Rawnsley DFC, DFM & Bar. The body of Gefrieter Rudolf Faath was washed ashore at Burnham Ovary on the 31st August 1941. The bodies of the other 3 crew members (G.Dohmen, H.Hädrich, and K.Dändel) were never found.

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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Handley Page Hampden I, X3147, took off from RAF Hemswell, Lincolnshire on the 1st March 1941 for a raid on Köln. On returning, the aircraft crashed at 04:14hrs at Syderstone, Norfolk and burst into flames.

Wireless Operator / Air Gunner Henry George Loates and his 3 crew members were all killed.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On New Years Day 1941, Henry Edward Middleton Featherstone and George Alexander Meridew were 2 of 7 crew members on board Lockheed Hudson I T9287 that took off from RAF Bircham Newton on a transit flight. While low flying, the port wing clipped a barn and the aircraft came down near Langham, Norfolk. All on board were killed.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Norman Alfred Sadler was born on the 30th July 1914 in Edmonton, Middlesex and was employed as a Clerical Officer in HM Office of Works before joining the RAFVR in August 1939 as an Airman u/t Observer.

Called up on the 1st September 1939, he completed his training, was commissioned and arrived at No. 1 (Coastal) OTU in late July 1940. After training on Bristol Blenheims he was posted to 235 Squadron on the 14th August.

On the 16th December 1940, he was a member of the crew of Bristol Blenheim Z5754 on a minelaying escort operation. Sadler, P/O J Coggins and Sgt. PR Prosser were all lost when the aircraft crashed into the sea off Titchwell, Norfolk, cause unknown.

Only Sadler's body was recovered.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Taking off from RAF Watton, Norfolk, the crew of Bristol Blenheim IV, T2229, were tasked with bombing Ehrang but there were believed to have bombed a target near Koblenz, on the 28th October 1940.

On their return to Norfolk, their aircraft crashed at Cranmer Hall near Sculthorpe. Pilot Ian Prosser, Observer Arthur Fraser Dallas and Sergeant Jack Hardcastle were all killed, with Hardcastle buried in his home city of Leeds.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 5th August 1940, Lockheed Hudson I P5133 took off from RAF Bircham Newton for an air-sea rescue operation. On return to base at 18:00hrs, the aircraft stalled and crashed at Ringers Farm, Syderstone, around 5 miles from Bircham Newton.

Pilot Robin Rustom and three crew members were all killed.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Oberfeldwebel Emil Rödel was a crew member on the floatplane Heinkel He 115, S4+BL, of 3 Staffel (Squadron) of Kustenfliegergruppe (Maritime Group) 506. The aircraft hit a chain low radio mast at West Beckham, Norfolk, and narrowly missed the Sheringham Gas holder, before crashing onto the beach at Sheringham, Norfolk, at 03.15hrs on the 6th Dec 1939.

The crew of 3 were all killed.

A contemporary newspaper account, and 3 photographs, of this incident can still be seen in the bar of a Sheringham public house “The Two Lifeboats”.

Emil Rödel was buried, in an unused corner of the Churchyard with full military honours, including a RAF bearer party, on the 9th December 1939. The coffin was draped in 2 swastika flags and there was a large wreath inscribed, "A tribute to a gallant airman from the officers, NCO’s and airmen of the RAF".

The bodies of the other two crew members (W.Wodtke & K.Ullman) were washed ashore later in the month and given full military funerals at Sheringham. After the War the remains of these two Airmen were reburied at the German War Cemetery at Cannock Chase.

When British experts examined the Heinkel, it was found to have self-sealing fuel tanks. The British scientists had been working for several years to perfect a rubber material to line fuel tanks, so that in the event of a puncture by a bullet the aircraft would not leak fuel and catch fire. It is said that the capture of this aircraft enabled them to solve the problems.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Anthony Barrington Giles was killed whilst flying in Lockheed Hudson V, AE647 of No 500 Sqn, when it crashed on the beach at Brancaster, Norfolk, on the night of the 17th February 1942.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 8th June 1941, the crew of Bristol Blenheim IVF V5689 took off from RAF Bircham Newton to provide air experience to two new ground staff officers.

Flying in mist, the aircraft crashed at Holmes-next-the-Sea on the north Norfolk coast.

Pilot Frederick William Hall-Jones and all on board were killed.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 15th May 1942, two formations of Lockheed Hudsons left RAF Bircham Newton detailed to carry out a strike on enemy shipping, previously spotted by a Beaufighter off Terschelling at 18:15hrs.

Lockheed Hudson AM906 'O' from 407 Squadron, was badly damaged during the attack with both engines being partially damaged. The pilot brought aircraft to base but before landing could be made, both engines failed completely and the Hudson crash-landed. The Observer, Angus Kippen, was killed and the wireless operator and air-gunner badly hurt.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator / Air Gunner Raeside Harley Brown lost his life on the 28th February 1942 whilst flying in Vickers Wellington, Z8702, of the CCDU, which was lost on a patrol off the Dutch coast
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Avro Lancaster I R5558 from RAF Woodhall Spa, Lincolnshire, crashed into the sea four miles off Wells, Norfolk, on the 14th July 1942 while flying at 300 feet in low cloud.

The Wells lifeboat "Royal Silver Jubilee 1910 - 1935" was launched shortly after 06:15hrs on receiving a report of the downed aircraft, under the command of Coxswain Theodor Neilson. The still floating fuselage of the Lancaster was found, together with one seriously injured crew member (Fg Off Davies) clinging to the wing. Coxswain Theodor Neilson boarded the remains of the fuselage to search for possible survivors, even though there was a considerable risk of the aircraft sinking. Finding no-one in the fuselage, the lifeboat returned to Wells and Fg Off Davies was taken to Wells hospital where he unfortunately died shortly afterwards. The Lifeboat returned to search for the rest of the 7 crew and recovered the bodies of Fg Off Blease and Flt Sgt. McPhee. The other 4 crew members were never found, and are remembered on the RAF memorial at Runnymede. John Blease was buried on the 18th July 1942 in joint funeral with his 2 fellow crew members.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 11th June 1943, Vickers Wellington X MS486 took off from RAF Leconfield for a mission to Düsseldorf. 783 aircraft took part with 38 losses (4.9%). PFF marking was accurate but one Mosquito inadvertently released some target indicators far from the target, confusing the main force and causing many bombs to fall in open countryside. Nevertheless, much damage was caused to the centre of Düsseldorf.

One engine on MS486 was disabled by anti-aircraft fire and with the other overheating, the aircraft was forced to jettison its single 4,000-lb bomb and turn for home. The pilot was preparing to make an emergency landing at RAF Docking when the runway lights went out. He tried to go round again, but the plane crashed at Stanhoe and caught fire.

Two of the crew were killed and three others survived. The pilot, F/O FW Jackson, is buried at New Hunstanton Cemetery. The navigator, F/O Ronald Lea, is buried here at Great Bircham.

The rear gunner, Sgt Ivor Prothero, survived severe burns and later wrote a detailed account of the events of that night, including how ARP warden Charlie Seaman was the first civilian on the scene and received a commendation for bravery.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Handley Page Halifax II W7929 took off from RAF Linton-on-Ouse at 23:52 hours on the night of 30th/1st May 1943, detailed to bomb Essen, Germany. The aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire and on reaching the East Anglian coast, W7929 crashed at 04:47 hours while attempting to make an emergency landing at RAF Docking, Norfolk. Five of the crew were killed and two were injured. The pilot had reported that two engines were unserviceable.

The crew members of W7929 were:

Sergeant R Davies (645244) (RAF) Injured
Sergeant Herbert Mason (1380052) (RAFVR)
Sergeant William Oldroyd (1124471) (RAFVR) (Rear Gunner)
Sergeant Ronald James Pike (657492) (RAFVR)
Sergeant J Rashbrook (2206682) (RAF) Injured
Flight Sergeant James Chadd Rudd (416288) (Pilot)
Sergeant Ernest John Wilson (546293) (RAF)

Flight Sergeant James Chadd Rudd DFM Citation:

On his first solo operation, this Non-Commissioned Officer was Captain and pilot of a Halifax aircraft detailed to attack Stettin on the night of 21st April 1943. When flying at 500 feet at a distance of 220 miles from his target, the starboard inner engine was badly damaged by flak and had to be feathered. Sergeant Rudd carried on, climbing from 500 to 12,000 feet and delivering a successful attack from this height. On returning to base, he carried out a successful landing under conditions of poor visibility. It is considered that this comparatively inexperienced pilot showed great devotion to duty and set a shining example, both to his own and other crews at this Station. He is recommended for the immediate award of the DFM. (LG 14/5/1943) Remarks by Station Commander: This NCO undoubtedly showed tenacity of purpose to a high degree. His determination to carry out the task allotted to him in spite of the possibility of further failure and the heightened of being shot down by enemy fighters because of his inability to keep in the main stream indicates marked courage and resolution, especially as this was his first operational sortie. The recommendation of the Squadron Commander is therefore strongly endorsed. Remarks by Air Officer Commanding: I strongly recommend that the determination and courage shown by this young Captain be recognised by the immediate award of the DFM.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Jack Rhodes lost his life on the 1st March 1945 when his Avro Lancaster I NG184 crashed into the sea off the Norfolk coast when returning to RAF Scampton from a mission to Mannheim.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

19 year old Flight Engineer Kenneth Leonard Wallace lost his life on board Short Stirling III EH960 when his aircraft crashed into the Wash due to excessive vibrations, leading to loss of control, on the 17th October 1943. The air test, from RAF Witchford, also claimed the lives of 6 crew members.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The crew of Handley Page Hampden, AE435 of No. 145 RCAF Coastal Command, took off from RAF Docking for an operation against German shipping off Iymuiden, Holland, on the 18th February 1943. It immediately crashed into Dorking railway station, killing the crew members who are buried together here. The area was evacuated as the unexploded torpedo was still on board.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 9th May 1939, Avro Anson I, K6210, of 220 Squadron, was involved in a collision with another 220 Squadron Avro Anson, K6225, at RAF Bircham Newton. The crews were performing a training flight with four other Avro Ansons. At the end of the exercise and when returning to base, the propeller blades of Anson K6225 hit the tail of K6210. Out of control, K6210 went into a spin and crashed in a field near the airfield

Sgt Robert Norman Riddell (aged 23) killed
Sgt David Peacock (aged 26) killed
Corporal Charles Samson (aged 38) killed

The occupants of the K6225 were not injured and the aircraft was only slightly damaged.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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SuffolkBlue
Posts: 1390
Joined: Sun 31 Aug 2008, 7:31 pm
Location: Bury St. Edmunds

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 22/09/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

I had been meaning to visit the 2 CWGC sites at Cannock Chase for a while and although I didn't get as much time there as I would have liked (I will head back there again at some point as a result), I made the small detour off the M6 recently to head over.

During the First World War when there was a large military camp at Cannock Chase which became the base for the New Zealand Rifle Brigade. There was also a prisoner-of-war hospital with 1,000 beds, and both camp and hospital used the burial ground.

CWGC Cannock Chase War Cemetery contains 97 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, most of them New Zealanders, and 286 German burials. There are also three burials of the Second World War. The 58 German burials in Plot 4 were all brought into the cemetery in 1963, as part of the German Government's policy to remove all graves situated in cemeteries or war graves plots not maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

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CWGC Cannock Chase War Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cannock Chase War Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cannock Chase War Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cannock Chase War Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

ImageCWGC Cannock Chase War Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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SuffolkBlue
Posts: 1390
Joined: Sun 31 Aug 2008, 7:31 pm
Location: Bury St. Edmunds

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 24/09/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

A 5 minute walk away is the CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery, which contains nearly 5,000 burials from both the First and Second World War. The burials are mainly German and Austrian nationals with a very small number of Ukrainians.

On the 16th October 1959, the governments of the United Kingdom and the Federal Republic of Germany made an agreement about the future care of the remains of German military personnel and German civilian internees of both world wars who at the time were interred in various cemeteries not already maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. It was agreed that the remains would be transferred to a single central cemetery established on Cannock Chase for this purpose.

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The German War Graves Commission (Volksbund Deutsche Kriegsgräberfürsorge or "VDK") made the necessary arrangements and the inauguration and dedication of this cemetery, which is maintained under the inter-government agreement by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission - took place in June 1967. I

The entrance building contains visiting room where the cemetery register is available on request. A plan of the plots within the cemetery is also on display. From here a small courtyard with a covered passage forms the connection to the Hall of Honour, which has at its centre, resting on a large block of stone, a bronze sculpture of a fallen warrior, by the German sculptor Professor Hans Wimmer.

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the west-facing terrace there is a granite monument to the crews of the four airships (SL 11, L32, L31, L48) shot down in World War I and who lie buried here in a tomb.

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the afternoon of the 2nd September 1916, sixteen airships, twelve from the German Naval Airship Division and four from the Army Division, set out for England on what was to be the biggest air raid of the war. For the first time the two services were combining. The vessels were carrying a total load of 32 tons of bombs. The 'Leader of Airships,' Fregattenkpitan Peter Strasser, was still determined that his airships would bring England to her knees.

Among the army airships was one from the Schtte-Lanz factories at Leipzig. The SL11 was the most recent addition to the fleet having entered into service on the 12th August 1916. It had set off on the raid of 31st August, but had been turned back by bad weather. On 2nd September it would complete the journey to London for the first, and last, time.

In command of SL11 was Hauptmann Wilhelm Schramm, an experienced airship captain who knew the area he was to bomb better than most of his colleagues. He had been born at Old Charlton, Kent, and lived in England until the age of 15 when on the death of his father, the London representative of the Siemens electrical firm, he returned to Germany and joined the army. He was given his first command in December 1915. Schramm had an experienced crew flying with him that night who had already served with him on several raids in the Zeppelin airship LZ39. They totalled only 16 men, machinists, gunners, 'elevator' man and 'bomb' man, officers and Captain.

At approximately 23.00 hours the Home Defence squadrons were put on alert. Radio messages from the airships had been intercepted, and a welcoming party was prepared. Ten aircraft were sent up that night. First away was BE2c 2963, her pilot having first personally supervised the pre-flight checks. The fog was thick and getting worse, but Robinson was convinced it would be clearer higher up. He had three drums of Brock and Pommeroy ammunition, and just enough fuel to keep him aloft for three and a half hours. He took off safely and disappeared into the mist.


Schramm approached London from the North, passing over Royston and Hitchin. Consequently he was not the first to arrive over the capital. LZ98 under Hauptmann Ernst Lehmann had that distinction, and by 01.00 hours was heavily engaged by the guns of the Dartford and Tilbury defences. Dropping his bombs over what he took to be the London docks, Lehmann took his ship up to 13,000 feet. Suddenly an aircraft was spotted approaching the airship. Robinson had seen the Zeppelin caught in the beam of search lights, and had slowly climbed up to meet it. The experienced Lehmann, with a much lighter ship now that his bombs were gone, promptly headed for cloud and continued to ascend. He soon outstripped the night pilot and disappeared. Robinson no doubt cursed his luck. He had already been in the air for two hours, and had only one and a half hours flying time left.

Half an hour later SL11 was wreaking destruction over North London. The Finsbury and Victoria Park searchlights caught her over Alexandra Palace, and the Finsbury gunners filled the air around the ship with explosives. Schramm turned his craft and headed for Walthamstow trying to dodge the fingers of light. Hundreds of people watched, but no matter how close they burst, the ground defence's shells seemed to have no effect. The spectators that night however were treated to a sight that was completely new to their experience. The crowds fell silent. An aircraft, running a gauntlet of shell fire, was fast approaching.

Robinson had given up searching for LZ39, and attracted by the commotion over Ponder's End and Enfield Highway, headed for what he presumed must be another airship. The shell fire grew intense as he neared SL11, and might very well have put an end to his attack before he had got within range. Remembering how LZ39 had so easily outdistanced him as he tried to gain height, Robinson this time headed straight for the airship. The watching crowd below swelled as the news spread that a pilot was within striking distance of the hated 'Zepp'. Suddenly the firing stopped, the searchlights swung frantically, and to cries of despair and frustration from the crowd, the airship found cloud cover and disappeared from sight.

The silence lasted a few moments only. As suddenly as it had vanished, the airship reappeared. Every gun roared and the night sky came alive with explosions. The aircraft was rocked by the blasts, but closed in on the airship.

Robinson had his first drum of Brock and Pommeroy ready, and as he flew alongside the airship he riddled its entire length with bullets. He turned his tiny aeroplane around and viewed the Schtte-Lanz. The airship appeared to be completely unaffected by the attack. Robinson fitted his second drum and raked the length of the vessel a second time. Still there was no result. It seemed the massive craft was impregnable. It sailed on almost majestically, as though studiously ignoring the puny aircraft circling below it. To the thousands of spectators it seemed as though a midge was fluttering around a lamp, vainly beating its wings against a glowing bulb. Robinson had one drum of ammunition left, and precious little fuel. Now behind and slightly below the airship, he changed tactics. He dived at the thin end of the craft, heading for the twin rudders above and below the pair of elevators, any one of which was larger than his entire machine. His last drum of ammunition was poured into that one area. Now the guns of the ground defences were silent and all eyes were fixed on the airship, glowing in the searchlights' powerful beams. They had no idea what the pilot was doing. They knew nothing of new incendiary bullets. They did not realise that. as they watched a stream of explosive was pouring into the smallest section of the airship, ripping through its cotton skin. The first indication to them, to the pilot, and probably to the airship's crew themselves, that the longed for victory was at hand, was a dull pink glow from within the rear portion of the ship. Within seconds the tail section was alight, and flames over 100 feet long shot out into the night sky. Almost in an instant the entire hull of the airship seemed to be in flames. Thousands .of cubic feet of hydrogen ignited with a brilliance which lit the sky, turning night into day. The spectators were dazzled. The searchlights were suddenly unnecessary. Observers in Reigate reported seeing the explosion. It was 2.30 in the morning on Sunday 3 September, and 12,500 feet above London a German airship, while in the very act of bombing the capital, had been attacked and completely destroyed.

For thousands of people it was without doubt one of the most memorable events of the entire war. It is difficult to imagine one man achieving anything more spectacular. The blazing wreckage of SL11 slowly fell to earth in a field in Cuffley, Hertfordshire. Before it reached the ground London was celebrating in boistrous fashion. Oblivious to the fact that other enemy airships were overhead, the city erupted in a frenzy of rejoicing. There was singing and dancing in the streets, small boys paraded up and down while their parents hugged one another or burst into patriotic song. Factory hooters and engine whistles added to the din. The excitement was to last for days. Long before dawn hundreds of sightseers set out for Cuffley to view the wreckage.

While London rejoiced, Robinson turned for home. With fuel tanks almost empty he landed at Sutton's Farm at 02.45 hours after a gruelling patrol of three and a half hours. Met by the excited ground crews who milled around the aircraft, Robinson had only to answer a brief affirmative to the question on every man's lips. With a cheer he was borne shoulder high in triumph from his aircraft to the office. Though exhausted and numb with cold Robinson was ordered to write a report immediately.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The German Zeppelin L.32 (production designation of "LZ-74") first flew on the 4th August 1916 and was formally commissioned a short time later on the 7th August.Her war record included a total of eleven missions, with three air raids against Britain. She dropped a total of 15,124lbs of ordnance during her service life.

Her end came on the night of 24th September 1916 when she fell to a British BE.2c of 39 Home Defence Squadron near Great Burstead, Essex, after having been engaged by ground-based anti-aircraft fire. The resulting crash killed her entire crew. L.33 was lost in the same raid and marked a rethinking of strategy concerning bomber Zeppelins for the Germans.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

German Naval Airship Service Zeppelin L31 was commanded by Kapitanleutnant Heinrich Mathy, a renowned veteran of numerous raids over Great Britain. On the 1st October 1916, Mathy commanded the L31 on its final mission - an attempted bombing raid on London. During this operation his airship was attacked by 2nd Lieutenant Wulfstan Tempest in a BE2c.

Tempest succeeded in igniting the gas in the airship, which crashed in flames at Hadley Wood, near Potters Bar, Hertfordshire. The death of Mathy emphasised the growing efficiency of British air-defences and marked an end to German attempts to attack London with airships.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 17th June 1917, the Germans dispatched two Zeppelins which were able to fly at altitudes of 13,000ft - way beyond the 8,000ft flight ceiling of English fighter aircraft.

One Zeppelin, L42, crossed the Kent coast at Ramsgate and released its bombs, but L48 endured heavy winds over the Orford Ness coast, Suffolk. Its compasses froze and it developed engine problems.
The airship dropped a few bombs over Martlesham and Wickham Market before drifting over Saxmundham and Leiston. There it was forced to descend to a height that put it in range of Royal Flying Corps fighters. It was crippled by the gunfire in a descent lasting seven minutes as it became engulfed in flames, crashing in a cornfield between Theberton and Eastbridge. Of the 18 crew there were just three survivors.

The dead were laid to rest in the village churchyard before being moved here to Cannock Chase.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The other terrace forms a link between the Hall of Honour and the cemetery. The graves of the dead of the First and Second World War are generally separated and lie on either side of the gentle slopes of the cemetery with a valley between them. The burials are marked by headstones from Belgian Petit Granit and are usually inscribed for two individuals on the front and on the back.

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the night of the 25th / 26th April 1942, while on a bombing raid over Bath, the pilot of Dornier Do 217E-4 Werk # 1120 "F8 + EM" was reportedly dazzled by the searchlight of a Pentridge Hill (Dorset) regiment and crashed at Bottlebush Down, Handley Cross, Dorset at 05:05 hours.

The crew were subsequently buried nearby but have since been moved to Cannock Chase.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Dornier Do 17Z-3 2682 "7T + LL" struck balloon cables on a bombing mission and crashed at Nantglyn, near Denbighshire, Wales, on the 16th October 1940. All of the German crew were killed.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the night of 1st November 1941, Heinkel He-111 from the 7th Staffel Kampfgeschwader 40 was on a bombing mission over northern England when it was intercepted by a Bristol Beaufighter from RAF Valley, flown by pilot officer M.Shipard and Sgt. D.Oxby. The Heinkel was shot down over Anglesey, with the stricken bombercoming down near Bwlch-y-fen, nr Gwalchmai.

All were lost in the crash and sadly due to the total destruction of the plane the pilots body was never found, with the others now rest here at Cannock Chase.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Gotha G.V 938/16 from BG 3/Bs 14, crewed by Ltn Friedrich von Thomsen, Uffz Karl Ziegler and Uffz Walter Heiden, was shot down on the 28th January 1918.
After bombing Hampstead at 21:45 hours, it was attacked and came down at Frund's Farm, near Wickford, at 22:10 hrs.The attackers were two Sopwith Camels from No 44 Sqn RFC; Lt C C Banks in B3827 and Capt G H Hackwill in B2402. The three Gotha crew members were killed.

Lt Banks and Capt Hackwill were both awarded the MC.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Bf 110C-4 2123 "3M + CH" was shot down on the 25th August 1940 during aerial combat over Winfrith, East Chaldon, near Warmwell. Lt Karl Westphal and his gunner Uffz Josef Brief were the victims of F/O Darley & Tobin of 609 Sq.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

ImageCWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Dornier Do 17Z-3 was shot down on the 16th August, 1940 by three Hawker Hurricanes while on a mission in the Canterbury area. The aircraft exploded with the remains falling on the beach at Whitstable, Kent. The four deceased crew members are buried in a collective grave here.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Messerschmitt Me 410A was shot down in combat by S/Ldr Caldwell and F/O Rawling in a de Havilland Mosquito of No.96 Squadron on the 23rd February 1944. This was one of four aircraft, which was flying about 23,000 ft. on a north west course for London when it was attacked by a night-fighter and set on fire. The aircraft went into a steep dive and exploded on impact with the ground at Bentley Farm, Framfield near Uckfield, Sussex, with wreckage was scattered over a wide area and only fragments of papers were found.

Extract from Sussex Police Report Ref. CA.3/44/81

This plane was attacked by a night fighter and was seen falling in flames. When it crashed, the bombs on board exploded, throwing portions of wreckage and pieces of the bodies of the airmen nearly 300 yards away. Only small portions of bodies were found (Sufficient to fill a sack quarter full). A military Medical Officer examined the hands and feet which were found and said without question they were from two different bodies. Also portions of two mens identity cards were found. The two occupants were – Uffz. Reinhard Eggers and Ogfr. Stefan Bednorz.

F/Lt Hunt, Tangmere, conducted an enquiry and gave me the information regarding the identity of the plane and occupants. The Home Guard established a guard on the plane until they were relieved by the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders of Canada.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Junkers Ju 88 A-1, 886116, L1+EP, crashed into the sea near Dungeness on the 4th October 1940. The body of Gefreiter Peter Schoffmann was washed ashore at Dover on the 18th November 1940.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr
Last edited by SuffolkBlue on Thu 24 Sep 2020, 10:27 am, edited 2 times in total.

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SuffolkBlue
Posts: 1390
Joined: Sun 31 Aug 2008, 7:31 pm
Location: Bury St. Edmunds

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 24/09/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

The major CWGC sites in North London are some of the last for me to cover that are fairly “local”. With the autumn colours coming through and having the first free Sunday for a while, I planned to visit a number of cemeteries in the area.

The first of two locations in Enfield is the CWGC Enfield Crematorium. 55 casualties of World War Two are commemorated by name on an octagonal memorial of Portland stone in the crematorium grounds. The memorial forms the focal point of a sunken garden of remembrance which is located to the left of the main drive.

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CWGC Enfield Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 26th September 1942, Air Bomber Edward Douglas Morgan, from Enfield, and his two crew members were killed when their Armstrong Whitworth Whitley V AD667 crashed moments after lifting off from the runway at RAF Abingdon on a training mission.
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CWGC Enfield Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Enfield Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

CWGC Enfield (Hertford Road) Cemetery contains war graves of both world wars. There are 22 burials of the First World War comprising 3 sailors of the Royal Navy, one man from the Royal air Force and 17 soldiers from the United Kingdom. The Second World War burials number 50, with around half of these in a plot to the left of the main path. The remainder are scattered throughout the cemetery.

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CWGC Enfield (Hertford Road) Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Handley Page Halifax V LL283 took off from RAF Dishforth for a night navigation exercise on the 31st August 1944.

During the flight, an engine caught fire over North Wales and the flames quickly spreading along the wing. The order to bale out was given but only six were in a position to do so. The aircraft crashed at Llanystumdwy, near Caernarfon.

Flight Engineer Alan William Pack, of Ponders End, Enfield and one other crew member lost their lives,
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CWGC Enfield (Hertford Road) Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 3rd October 1943, Handley Page Halifax II JD276 overshot the runway at RAF Pocklington on return to base after a training mission and whilst going around again, crashed and burst into flames near Heyton, near Market Weighton, Yorkshire.

All of the crew, including Wireless Operator Douglas William Graham Randall, were killed.
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CWGC Enfield (Hertford Road) Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 10th July 1940, the crew of Avro Anson I N5228 were ordered to patrol the skies between Dunkirk and Dieppe but lost control during night take-off from RAF Detling in bad visibility and crashed at Thurnham, south-east of the airfield at 2:35am. (Pilot) Sgt James Wilson, (Obs) Sgt William George Shier, (WOP/AG) Sgt Leo Frederick James O’Kelly, and (AG) Sgt Horace George Worton were all killed.
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CWGC Enfield (Hertford Road) Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

CWGC Edmonton Cemetery contains burials of both wars. Most of the First World War graves are of servicemen who died in the North Middlesex Hospital, then the Edmonton Military Hospital. Nearly all are buried in the war plot behind the chapel.

A small number of the Second World War burials form a separate plot, in the corner of which stands a small stone memorial commemorating six men whose graves could not be marked by headstones.

The cemetery also contains a screen wall bearing the names of 39 casualties buried in Tottenham Park Cemetery whose graves could no longer be maintained.

In all, 167 First World War and 156 Second World War casualties are now commemorated in this cemetery.

Near the First World War plot is a memorial to the victims of the Edmonton Air Disaster which occurred on the 4th September 1938. A Hawker Audax K7381, of No. 1 Elementary and Reserve Flying Training School, based at Hatfield, crashed into a residential area of Edmonton. The aircraft was being flown by a 19-year-old pilot, Sgt Stanley Robert Morris RAFVR.

It is thought that Morris was attempting to land the aircraft at Pymmes Park when it hit the roof of one house, fell into the roadway, and ended up on the roof of two houses on Dunholme Road, setting fire to the properties and killing the pilot and six of the occupants of the two houses. The 29 injured were taken to the North Middlesex Hospital, mostly with burns; 13 were detained in hospital, where five of them subsequently died.

An inquest was held at North Middlesex Hospital on the 7th September 1938, where evidence showed that the pilot was disobeying orders in flying over the area. An instructor at the Flying Training School said that Morris had been told to fly local circuits at Hatfield and should have stayed within three miles of the aerodrome. Edmonton is around 12 miles from Hatfield. The inquest heard that the aircraft had been fit to fly and had been flown by other pilots that day. Morris had also been seen on the same day low-flying contrary to his orders. The coroner returned a verdict of accidental death to all the victims.

The Air Ministry released a report on the accident stating that Morris was operating contrary to orders; not only had he flown further than three miles from the aerodrome, he was also manoeuvring at low level over a built-up area. He appears to have dived from 1,000 ft, flattened out his dive and continued to fly at low level when he lost further height and struck the roof of a house. The investigation could find no evidence of a defect in the engine or aircraft.

Edward and James Letch, brothers who tried to rescue the pilot from the aircraft, died in hospital from burns. They were posthumously awarded the Order of the British Empire.

In 2008 a memorial stone was laid at Dunholme Road Air Disaster Memorial in Church Street Cemetery on the seventieth anniversary of the crash.
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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

HMS Princess Irene was a 5,394 GRT ocean liner which was built in 1914 by William Denny and Brothers Ltd, Dumbarton, Scotland for the Canadian Pacific Railway. She was requisitioned by the Royal Navy on completion and converted to an auxiliary minelayer.

In May 1915, Princess Irene was moored in Saltpan Reach, on the Medway Estuary in Kent between Port Victoria and Sheerness, being loaded with mines in preparation for deployment on a minelaying mission.

At 11:14hrs on the 27th May 1915, Princess Irene exploded and disintegrated. A column of flame 300 feet high was followed a few seconds later by another of similar height and a pall of smoke hung over the spot where Princess Irene had been, reaching to 1,200 feet. Two barges laying alongside her were also destroyed. The explosion was larger than that which had destroyed HMS Bulwark in the Medway six months earlier, although the loss of life was less. A total of 352 people were killed, including 273 officers and men, and 76 dockyard workers who were on board Princess Irene. On the Isle of Grain a girl of nine was killed by flying debris, and a farmhand died of shock. A collier half a mile away had its crane blown off its mountings. A part of one of Princess Irene's boilers landed on the ship and a man working on the ship died from injuries sustained when he was struck by a piece of metal weighing 70 pounds.

Wreckage was flung up to 20 miles away, with people near Sittingbourne being injured by flying debris, some of which landed in Bredhurst. Severed heads were found at Hartlip and on the Isle of Grain. The sole survivor from Princess Irene was a stoker, who suffered severe burns. Three of her crew had a lucky escape as they were ashore at the time.

A Court of Inquiry was held into the loss of Princess Irene. Evidence was given that priming of the mines was being carried out hurriedly and by untrained personnel. A faulty primer was blamed for the explosion. Following the loss of HMS Natal on the 30th December 1915 and HMS Vanguard on the 9th July 1917, both caused by internal explosions, suspicion was raised at the inquiry into the loss of Natal that sabotage was to blame for the loss of all four ships. A worker at Chatham Dockyard was named as a suspect, but a thorough investigation by Special Branch cleared him of any blame.
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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 18th September 1945, Consolidated B-24J Liberator C8, KN736, of 466 (Australian) Squdron, RAAF, crashed at Potton Wood, Potton, near Cockayne Hatley, Bedfordshire.

466 Squadron were based at RAF Bassingbourn in Cambridgeshire, and were learning how to operate the American B-24 as a replacement for their Halifax. A training flight was planned in order to introduce and test the reactions of a mixed British and Australian crew to emergency engine failure conditions. A three-engined takeoff and landing would be followed by another flight when two engines would be stopped.

Around 15:00hrs, the seven crew and a Scottish Terrier puppy climbed back into the refuelled KN736, a brand-new Liberator C8.

The Captain, Flt. Lt. Pat McNulty DFC, RAAF, a veteran of many operational flights in the similar Halifax, was at the controls in the left-hand seat. Under the instruction of Flight Lieutenant John Spiller DFC, RAF, of 59 Squadron from Waterbeach, seconded to 466 Squadron for this training, the flight engineers shut down the starboard outer engine as the wheels left the concrete; the remaining three engines powered the Liberator in her climb in a controlled and safe manner.

Pleased with the success of the crew and plane, Flt. Lt. Spiller decided that the other part of the training, handling the plane with just two operational engines, might as well be performed before ending the flight for the day with the three-engined landing. It was a momentous decision. It is possible Spiller felt under pressure of time. Squadron training had been delayed by bad weather that September, and on this day, the schedule was also running late, so he probably felt it would save time to skip the landing between the two scenarios.

At first, the shut down and feathering of the second, starboard inner engine, went perfectly well, though the effort to maintain straight flight required full left rudder. The aeroplane was losing altitude gradually, and the exercise had started at only 1,200 feet. Any attempt to make a turn to the right would have immediately spun the Liberator into the ground, and the crew discovered there to be insufficient control input remaining to achieve a left turn. Unable to maintain altitude at such a low level, the pilot was flying the plane in an exceptionally risky condition at the limit of control, and as KN736 headed north-west, the land was gently rising towards the Greensand Ridge at Potton; before very long it became essential to restart at least one of the engines.

This was a critical time, as the propeller blades had first to be set to a fine pitch and allowed to 'windmill' to generate the momentum that a starter motor on the ground would have provided; this naturally added drag and slowed the plane significantly at a time when it needed all the speed it could get. The crew performed the tasks required but the engine stubbornly refused to restart, and the plane began to rapidly lose speed and altitude. Unable to turn and with the ground rising to meet them, the crew were suddenly in serious trouble, with very little time left to sort it out. They hurriedly un-feathered the inner starboard engine, again slowing the plane yet more, but all attempts to restart this engine also failed, and fairly quickly, the starboard wing stalled, KN736 went into a dive and crashed into the southern boundary of Potton Wood. The plane broke into sections and burst into flames.

Crew of B-24 KN736:

Captain, Flight Lieutenant Patrick Joseph McNulty, DFC, RAAF 426286, aged 22 - killed

Pilot Instructor: Flight Lieutenant John Edward James Spiller, DFC, RAF 147197, aged 28 - killed

Co-pilot, Flying Officer Francis George "Frank" Doak, RAAF 419770 - survived but badly injured

Flying Officer Noel P. Gilmour, RAAF 428664 - survived but badly injured

Flight Engineer: Flight Sergeant. Roy Delbert Turner, RAF 1863014. aged 20 - killed

Instructing Flight Engineer: Flight Sergeant Raymond Victor Carling, RAF 1803034 - survived but badly injured

Wireless Operator/Air Gunner: Warrant Officer James Raymond "Jim" Potter, RAAF 434008 - killed
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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Bristol Beaufighter TFX NE813 of 132 Operational Training Unit, took off from RAF East Fortune on the 2nd May 1945 at 23:05hrs and last heard calling at 02:14hrs. Fifteen minutes later, while flying at 1300 feet and having veered off track, NE813 flew into high ground at Wester Dod on Slottenclough Farm, Cockburnspath, Berwickshire.

Pilot Harry Kenneth Lillington was buried at Haddington, East Lothian, and his Navigator Aubrey John Clarke here in the Edmonton Cemetery.
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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

CWGC Tottenham Cemetery contains burials of both wars. Most of the 293 First World War graves are in a plot on the western side of the cemetery, backed by a Screen Wall bearing the names of those buried both there and elsewhere in the cemetery, whose graves could not be individually marked.

There are 212 burials of the Second World War, mostly scattered, but 30 graves form a small plot facing the First World War plot. Again, some graves could not be individually marked and these casualties are commemorated on supplementary panels to the Screen Wall.
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CWGC Tottenham Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Tottenham Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Tottenham Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Tottenham Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Tottenham Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Gunner Albert Henry Berry & Gunner George Brown were killed on the 10th January 1945 when an ordnance they were working on accidentally exploded.
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CWGC Tottenham Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Tottenham Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Tottenham Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Tottenham Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Tottenham Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

In CWGC St Pancras Cemetery, over 100 graves from both wars form a war graves plot. The plot also contains a number of headstones removed from graves scattered elsewhere in the cemetery that could not be maintained. A further memorial bears the names of 27 casualties whose graves could not be marked individually, and six First World War casualties buried in adjacent Islington Cemetery who could not be commemorated there.

There are now 308 First World War commemorations in St Pancras Cemetery, including 1 unidentified sailor of the Royal Navy, and 208 from the Second World War. There are 5 foreign national burials and 2 non-war service burials here.

The forecast of a dry day went pretty much downhill for the 30 minutes, with a downpour happening just as I arrived, so it was a short visit here.

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CWGC St. Pancras Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC St. Pancras Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC St. Pancras Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 27th July 1940, whilst loading bombs onto Fairey Battle L5528 of 150 Sqn at RAF Newton, Nottinghamshire, one of the bombs fell off the aircraft and began to burn. Despite an heroic effort from aircrew and ground crew to put out the flames, the bomb exploded, killing six men from 150 Sqn, with another man killed and one other injured from the airfield.
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CWGC St. Pancras Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC St. Pancras Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC St. Pancras Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC St. Pancras Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC St. Pancras Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Within the same area is CWGC Islington Cemetery, which contains 344 First World War graves and 265 from the Second World War, all scattered throughout the cemetery. A screen wall in the western part bears the names of those whose graves could not be marked individually, together with the names of two casualties from the Second World War whose remains were cremated at Islington Crematorium.

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CWGC Islington Cemetery and Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Islington Cemetery and Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Islington Cemetery and Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Land in CWGC East Finchley Cemetery was set aside in December 1916 for the burial of ex-Officers and men of His Majesty's Forces from the Borough whose deaths resulted from wounds received or disease contracted in the First World War. A number of pre and Second World War casualties are also buried here.
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CWGC East Finchley Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Finchley Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Navigator Arthur Frederick Witt and his pilot took off from RAF Swannington in de Havilland Mosquito NF.30 MV546 on the 26th January 1945 for a night training exercise.
They were recalled due to worsening weather and instructed to use the Mother Approach method but the Mosquito exploded as it dived into the ground near Oulton airfield, Norfolk.

Both he and the pilot, Thomas William Redfern, were killed. The pilots brother was killed in an aircraft accident while serving in the RAF aged 18, in 1938.
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CWGC East Finchley Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Finchley Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Finchley Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Finchley Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Finchley Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Finchley Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Finchley Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

CWGC Willesden New Cemetery contains 130 First World War graves and 121 from the Second World War. Most of the graves are scattered, although 29 of the Second World War graves form an informal group. A Screen Wall bears the names of those casualties from both wars buried in the cemetery whose graves could not be individually marked. The cemetery also contains a memorial erected by the Borough Council to the civilians of Willesden who lost their lives in enemy air raids.

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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Navigator Edward John Wood lost his life on the 26th February 1943 when his Handley Page Halifax II V9988 crashed on a night flying exercise. Taking off from RAF Riccall, the aircraft then lost an engine and crashed into trees north west of the airfield
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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the other side of the wall to this cemetery is the CWGC Willesden Jewish Cemetery. As cemeteries go, this is a pretty grand one, with a number of very impressive and overelaborate tombs and headstones.

There is a small CWGC World War One plot here
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CWGC Willesden Jewish Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden Jewish Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Driver Leslie Joseph Durlacher died at 7.45 pm on the 16th February 1919 at 1st Australian General Hospital, Sutton Veny, Wiltshire, England from broncho pneumonia.
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CWGC Willesden Jewish Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Gersh Breitman was born in Chechelnik, Pavlosh, Russia around 1896. He 19 years old and living in Sydney, NSW when he enlisted on the 27th August 1915 with the Australian Imperial Force.

While fighting in France, he was awarded the Military Medal – A.I.F. Orders 13th April, 1917.
Showed himself fearless and quick to act by rushing out from his post to assist 2nd Lieutenant Boileau who had
attacked four Germans in the open. By his prompt action he no doubt saved his officer‘s life and materially assisted
in the capture of the four enemy.

After surviving the war, he was admitted to the Military Hospital at Tidworth, Wiltshire on the 12th April 1919 with “Vincents Angina”. He died there at 8.50 am on the 19th April 1919 from tonsilitis, septicaemia & broncho pneumonia.
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CWGC Willesden Jewish Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The nearby CWGC World War Two plot is slightly larger. However, I was only able to photograph a few of the burials before I was informed by a cemetery ranger that I would need permission from the local council to take pictures. I assumed at first that this might be due to Jewish law that I’m unaware of, but he in fact wanted me to stop incase I sold the pictures to a magazine.

I explained my reasons and the research that I have done, but he wasn’t having any of it. There is a very impressive Jewish War Memorial near the CWGC plot which I went to have a look at, but as the ranger waited nearby to pounce on any move I made, it was pretty clear that I wasn’t welcome.

Of the hundreds of sites I have visited so far, this is the first time I have been asked to move on. Thankfully, on the previous occasions I have bumped into rangers, they have actively encouraged my work to tell the stories of the war dead buried in their churchyards and cemeteries.

I can’t see myself being in that part of London anytime soon, which irks me as I’m sure there are some great stories to be told from those who are buried there.

On the 21st May 1943, Avro Anson I DJ239 and Vickers Wellington HZ637 collided and crashed at Ellenborough Road and the nearby railway line, just east of Maryport, Cumberland. The crews of both aircraft were killed. The crew of Anson DJ239 were:

RCAF PO Macrae, A I Captain (Pilot)
RCAF Sgt M H Cornell, (Navigator)
RAF Sgt G B T Wymer (Navigator)
RAF Sgt T Green, (Wireless Air Gunner)
RAAF 421474 Sgt J T Sutherland, (Wireless Air Gunner)
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CWGC Willesden Jewish Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

During the afternoon of the 23rd April 1944, the crew of Handley Page Halifax V DK244 of 78 Squadron took off from RAF Breighton to undertake an air test. At 15.58hrs the aircraft entered a shallow dive and crashed just south of the village of Sutton upon Derwent. Sadly all but the rear gunner were killed in the crash, including Wireless Operator Leslie Israel.
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CWGC Willesden Jewish Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

During the afternoon of the 23rd April 1944, the crew of Handley Page Halifax III LV916 of 78 Squadron took off from RAF Breighton to undertake an air test. By 15.58hrs, the aircraft had not been in the air long when it entered a shallow dive and crashed just south of the village of Sutton upon Derwent. Sadly all but the rear gunner were killed in the crash, including Wireless Operator Leonard Shaiman.
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CWGC Willesden Jewish Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden Jewish Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

There are 69 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and 156 of the Second World War at CWGC Hendon Cemetery and Crematorium. Those whose graves are not marked by headstones are named on 2 Screen Wall memorials close the Cross of Sacrifice.

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CWGC Hendon Cemetery and Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hendon Cemetery and Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hendon Cemetery and Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hendon Cemetery and Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hendon Cemetery and Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

During the Second World War, many of the Middlesex hospitals, including that at Mill Hill, became Stationary Military Hospitals. The CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery contains 53 Second World War Commonwealth war graves, mostly situated in the war graves plot in section C.

This cemetery also contains The Netherlands Field of Honour, established in 1965. The plot contains the graves of more than 250 servicemen of the Netherlands, many of them having been brought to the cemetery from other United Kingdom burials grounds. The majority of the graves are those of Merchant seamen.

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Born in Marylebone, Owen Tudor Boyd was educated at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst. On the 20th January 1909, he was commissioned on the 'unattached list for the Indian Army' and attached to a British Army regiment in India before being appointed to the Indian Army in March 1910. He was posted to the Indian Army's 5th Cavalry and promoted Lieutenant on the 20 April 1911.

He was promoted temporary Captain Indian Army. From the 25th April 1916, he saw service in the First World War as a flying officer with the Royal Flying Corps. Later in 1916, he was a pilot on the Western Front with No. 27 Squadron and on the 9th July, promoted to flight commander. He was awarded the Military Cross in the London Gazette of 18 August 1916.

More promotions followed and on the 1st May 1936, he was promoted to air commodore of No. 1 Group RAF. He was appointed director of personal services at the Air Ministry in December 1936.

In 1938, as an air vice marshal, he became commander-in-chief RAF Balloon Command. On the 1st December 1940, he was replaced by Air Marshal Sir Leslie Gossage at RAF Balloon Command and promoted to air marshal and appointed deputy to the air officer commanding-in-chief (AOC-in-C) Middle East.

On his way to Egypt, he was to stop in Malta. However, the aircraft in which he and his staff were passengers was forced down over enemy-controlled Sicily by a group of Italian fighter aircraft. There is some controversy over his capture as Boyd was indoctrinated into "Ultra" intelligence and the advantage gained from breaking some German codes, which led to fears he could reveal this secret. Secondly one history book refers to "the reported circumstance is a navigation error and consequent fuel shortage".

After destroying his confidential papers by setting his own aircraft on fire, Boyd became a prisoner of war. He spent much of the war in the Castle Vincigliata (Castello di Vincigliata) camp near Florence, Italy.

When Italy capitulated in September 1943, he and two British Army generals (Philip Neame and Richard O'Connor, both captured in North Africa in 1941), with help from the Italian resistance movement, escaped while being transferred from Vincigliata. After spending time in the Italian countryside and a failed rendezvous with a submarine, they arrived by boat at Termoli, then went on to Bari where they were welcomed as guests by General Sir Harold Alexander, commanding the Allied Armies fighting on the Italian Front, on the 21st December 1943. Their escape was led by a Lieutenant Colonel Pat Spooner, who had escaped once before and returned to German-controlled Italy.

Of all of RAF Bomber Command's wartime group commanders, he spent the shortest time in command of his appointed group. In late July 1944, he was divorced. Little more than a week later, on the 5th August, he died from a heart attack.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 1st July 1944, a V1 bomb fell on Colindale Hospital. Four WAAF's were killed as a result, including Dora Burriss and Joan Gwendoline Sayers.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 29th April 1943, No.24 Sqn Lockheed Hudson IIIA FH307 left RAF Hendon and was scheduled to land to RAF Portreath, to be refueled before making the flight to Gibraltar and onwards. However, weather conditions at Portreath were poor and it was decided that the aircraft should stage through RAF Chivenor instead.

On the approach to land, the aircraft stalled, entered a spin and crashed. All of the crew on board were killed.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator Arthur George Hudd was killed on the 30th October 1942 when his Lockheed Hudson III, V8983 of No 24 Sqn, flew into a wooded hillside after descending to establish its position.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The de Havilland DH.95 Flamingo was a twin-engined high-wing monoplane airliner first flown on the 22nd December 1938. During the Second World War some were used by the Royal Air Force as a transport and general communications duties.

There was also a the transport variant of the Flamingo, called the Hertfordshire. Only one was ever built. de Havilland Hertfordshire R2510 crashed on the edge of the RAF Hendon on the 23rd October 1940, killing all but one on board. The survivor was Leonard Ernest Charles Blake, but he succumbed to his injures around a month later on the 24th November 1940.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 12th March 1940, Pilot Albert Charles Manaton was on board Avro Anson I N9824 on a training flight from RAF North Luffenham when it crashed near Swindon, killing him and his four crew members.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Auxiliary Fireman Reginald Bruce Wakeman died as a result of injuries he sustained by enemy action at Chelsea Fire Station on the 17th April 1941.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 16th / 17th April 1941, one of the heaviest attacks was made on London since the war began. Bombing commenced shortly after 21:00hrs and lasted until nearly dawn.

ARP Warden Amelia Schroeder Groom was killed when bombs fell at Pembridge Mansions, Moscow Road, London.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 10th May 1941 a bomb landed on a block of flats in Clifton Gardens, followed by a number of smaller incendiary bombs, and the whole four storey building caught fire. The first fire crew to arrive on the scene were inside the building when the top floor collapsed and three of the crew were killed instantly, including Arthur Teague, another two being badly wounded.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Cornelis van Rietbergen survived the torpedoing of his ship Amstelland in July 1940, but died of wounds aboard HMS Vanquisher after this ship was bombed by a German aircraft on the 28th February 1941.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 13th June 1942, 2nd Lietenat Dirk Jacobus Klink took off from RAF Ibsley, Hampshire, in Supermarine Spitfire Vb R7334 on a training flight. He lost control of the aircraft and was seen coming out of the cloud at 1,000ft and hit the ground in a vertical dive. He was instantly killed on what was his 30th birthday.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

From September 1939, Hatfield House, which belongs to the Marquis of Salisbury, was used as a military hospital. A small section of the park was enclosed and laid out as a cemetery for burials from this hospital, which was in use throughout the war.

CWGC Hatfield Park War Cemetery contains 20 graves from the Second World War, together with the grave of a civilian airman. In addition, a special memorial headstone commemorates one casualty buried in the redundant churchyard of Digswell (St. John), Welwyn Garden City, whose grave could no longer be maintained.

It’s probably one of the trickiest locations to get to that I have visited so far. It can only be accessed on foot from a small footpath leading to the busy Great North Road. So it required dumping the car in Hatfield and walking to the site, but it was well worth. After visiting the busy cemeteries in London, it was nice to end the days trip in this quiet cemetery in a small corner of the park.

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CWGC Hatfield Park War Cemetery- Hertfordshire, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hatfield Park War Cemetery- Hertfordshire, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Squadron Leader Wilfred Henry Broom died in a road traffic accident on the 12th May 1944. His motor car collided with an army vehicle on the Barnett by-pass. 2 civilians were also killed in the crash.
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CWGC Hatfield Park War Cemetery- Hertfordshire, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hatfield Park War Cemetery- Hertfordshire, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 23rd August 1943, de Havilland Mosquito VI HX849 collided with Mosquito VI HX850 while on air test flying low in cloudy weather between Hatfield and Salisbury Hall.

The aircraft disintegrated in the air, killing both of the two man crews. Observer John H. F. Scrope was in HX850, being flown by John de Havilland.
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CWGC Hatfield Park War Cemetery- Hertfordshire, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hatfield Park War Cemetery- Hertfordshire, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator / Air Gunner John Stewart Brownsell was killed on the 16th January 1942 when his Lockheed Hudson III V9097 of No 500 Sqn flew into high ground near North Walsham, Norfolk, at night.
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CWGC Hatfield Park War Cemetery- Hertfordshire, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

U/T Pilot Kenneth Anderson Knudson was killed whilst flying in de Havilland Tiger Moth II, N6486 of No 1 EFTS, when it collided with Airspeed Oxford, P1967 of No 14 SFTS near Barton-in-the-Clay, Bedfordshire, on the 8th October 1941.
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CWGC Hatfield Park War Cemetery- Hertfordshire, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hatfield Park War Cemetery- Hertfordshire, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

User avatar
SuffolkBlue
Posts: 1390
Joined: Sun 31 Aug 2008, 7:31 pm
Location: Bury St. Edmunds

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 29/10/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

CWGC West Row Baptist Chapelyard is the final resting place for 15 casualties of the First and Second World War. Most of these are airman who were killed during the first few months of hostilities in 1940.

The chapelyard is in the small village West Row, located at the western end of RAF Mildenhall. Most of casualties lost flying from Mildenhall and the local area are buried in the CWGC plot at Beck Row, on the other side of the airfield.

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CWGC West Row Baptist Chapelyard - West Row, Suffolk, Saturday 14th November 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC West Row Baptist Chapelyard - West Row, Suffolk, Saturday 14th November 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Vickers Wellington I N3006, of 99 Squadron, was airborne from RAF Newmarket Heath at 18:30hrs on 3rd March 1940 for a Nickel (leaflet dropping) misson. The squadron was recalled back to base as the mission was "scrubbed" due to reports of adverse weather over the target area. While approaching back to base, the aircraft crashed at Chalk Hill, Barton Mills, Suffolk, at 22:25hrs and burst into flames. The entire crew were killed.
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CWGC West Row Baptist Chapelyard - West Row, Suffolk, Saturday 14th November 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

ImageCWGC West Row Baptist Chapelyard - West Row, Suffolk, Saturday 14th November 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

At 22.50hrs on the 4th April 1940, while on a night flying practice exercise, Vickers Wellington IC P9267 came down a mile short of the runway at RAF Mildenhall and burst into flames.

The four man crew were killed and buried side by side here at West Row.

AC2 Leonard Frederick Foster died the next day after being admitted to the station sick quarters.
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CWGC West Row Baptist Chapelyard - West Row, Suffolk, Saturday 14th November 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC West Row Baptist Chapelyard - West Row, Suffolk, Saturday 14th November 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 19th June 1939, W/Op./Air Gunner Jack Maurice Forsdyke was killed when he bailed out of Bristol Blenheim I L1253, of the A&AEE Martlesham Heath. The aircraft record card has the summary of the Cause of Incident, which states the pilot had "climbed to 10,000 ft and the aircraft iced up. With the blind flying instruments not functioning correctly and no de-icing equipment fitted, he lost control. He recovered and eventually landed the aircraft back at Martlesham Heath.

Forsdyke is buried here in CWGC West Row Baptist Chapelyard, but his gravestone shows in error his date of death as the 20th, not the 19th.

A fuller account of the incident appeared in the local newspaper:

"Airmen's Nerve-Wracking Ordeal.
Bomber Dives Out of Control Over Icklingham.
Two Aircraftsmen Jump Out.
One Killed : Parachute Ripcord Not Pulled.
THE DRAMATIC STORY of how two Martlesham airmen took to parachutes and jumped for their lives when a Blenheim bomber, its blind-flying apparatus frozen up, came hurtling down out of control through dense clouds was told at a Mildenhall inquest on Wednesday evening.

Aircraftsman Christopher Stoddart landed safety in a belt of trees on Lord Iveagh’s estate at Icklingham, but his companion. Aircraftsman Jack Maurice Forsdyke, aged 22, whose home was at Collingwood Road, Lexden, was killed. The ripcord of his parachute had not been pulled.

During the course of a two hours' inquiry, Squadron-Leader Ian Grant MacKay, was flying the bomber from Martlesham to Scotland, told the Coroner for Liberty of Bury St. Edmund's (Mr. Thomas Wilson) and a jury that directly after the two men had jumped he felt something hit the tail fin, and, assuming it was the dead aircraftsman who had to leave by the rear hatch, it would before he had time to pull his ripcord

The Squadron-Leader described how just before noon on Monday, he took off from Martlesham in a heavy rain with clouds at 600 to 800 feet. Stoddart sat beside him in the navigator’s seat while Forsdyke was in the aft gun turret. For approximately quarter of an hour he flew at 500 feet and then started to climb above the rain clouds.

These however, were very much thicker than he expected. At 10,000 feet he was still in the clouds and it was then that he lost the use of his blind-flying apparatus through ice formations. He had expected to get out of the clouds at 4,000 feet.

"I continued to climb thinking I must be getting almost to the top"" he went on "but I did not see anything from the time we went into the clouds at 600 feet until we came out at Mildenhall. In endeavouring to come out of the climb I must have dropped a wing. The 'plane started to dive."

He felt certain that from both the noise and feel of the machine and after trying in vain for three or four seconds to recover he decided that they had better make preparations to leave the plane. Being afraid that the machine would become completely out of control. He told Stoddart to be prepared to leave and to pass the order on to Forsdyke. Stoddart opened the hatch in readiness. Then the speed of the 'plane decreased. This was at about 5,000 feet.

Thinking he had some control over it now, and hoping to remain at this height until the ice thawed to give him back the use of his blind-flying instruments, he indicated to the men to remain in the machine. But the speed increased again, and the bomber would not respond to the stick. By then they were getting near to the ground-the clouds underneath were getting much darker and he realised that with the machine travelling at 300 mph at about only 400 feet from the ground there would not much time for all three to jump out.

"I again warned Stoddard to prepare to leave the machine "" the Squadron-Leader continued ""and he stood on the seat looking through the hatch. Forsdyke got out of the other hatch. Then the machine began to lose speed once more. I felt I had control of the dive, so I tugged on Stoddart’s parachute harness to get him to come back, but he jumped out.

Almost at the same time we came out of clouds at approximately 800 feet in a slight dive. Directly I came the clouds I had control. At the time Stoddart jumped witness felt a sharp blow on the structure of the aircraft,and he thought one of the two men had hit the tail on leaving.

He afterwards flew round and round until he found a railway station which he was able to read as Mildenhall, and he then returned to Martlesham. Then marks were found on the outside of the ’plane. These definitely pointed to Forsdyke having hit the tail. This would be before he could pull the ripcord of his parachute.

Dr. Hugh Llewellyn Jenkins Medical Office at Mildenhall RAF Station said it was almost certain that Forsdyke hit the tail fin. Stoddart said that Forsdyke was half way out of the machine as he prepared to leave. He jumped when they were at a height of between 800 and 1,000 feet.

Answering Squadron-Leader MacKay, the aircraftsman agreed that he felt a tug on his harness just before he left, but it did not occur to him to look down to see what the pilot wanted.

Thomas Linney, an Icklinghham labourer, stated that he and a workmate heard the 'plane go over making a louder noise than usual. Directly he saw it, two objects which he thought were bombs left the machine, then all at once a parachute opened. A crash followed. "We ran across`"" Linney went on, "and saw an airman hanging over a wire fence. He whistled to us and said he was hurt a bit. His parachute was hanging up in a tree."

James Wright, an Icklingham tractor driver, said that Linney had just started off to take the airman to the police station when he found the other man lying dead near an alder stub. His unopened parachute was underneath him.

Police Constable A.E. Long (Icklingham) said he was the men leave the 'plane from Icklingham Street, where he was on duty and came to the conclusion exercises were being carried out. The machine was making a very unusual noise Sgt H. E. Reave (Mildenhall) said the ripcord of the dead man's parachute had not been pulled.

John Thomas Forsdyke, the father said his son had been in the R.A.F. nearly two years. The jury, over which Mr. J. C. Turner presided as foreman returned a verdict of ""Death by Misadventure"" Supt. Hammond (Newmarket) watched the proceedings on behalf of the police.
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CWGC West Row Baptist Chapelyard - West Row, Suffolk, Saturday 14th November 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 23rd May 1940, the crew of Vickers Wellington Ic P9270 took off from RAF Newmarket Heath at 22.30hrs to bomb the
marshalling yards at Givet, on the Franco-Belgian border was the target.

Their aircraft crashed, due to unknown reaons, near Barton Mills, Suffolk, as the crew prepared to land back at Newmarket. As stated above, three crew injured, three crew killed.

Three of the four man crew were killed, including Pilot Ian Douglas Grant-Crawford.
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CWGC West Row Baptist Chapelyard - West Row, Suffolk, Saturday 14th November 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 23rd May 1940, the crew of Vickers Wellington Ic P9270 took off from RAF Newmarket Heath at 22.30hrs to bomb the
marshalling yards at Givet, on the Franco-Belgian border was the target.

Their aircraft crashed, due to unknown reasons, near Barton Mills, Suffolk, as the crew prepared to land back at Newmarket. As stated above, three crew injured, three crew killed.

Three of the four man crew were killed, including Wireless Operator John Burton.
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CWGC West Row Baptist Chapelyard - West Row, Suffolk, Saturday 14th November 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Vickers Wellington I P927 of 99 Squadron failed to return from a mission to attack Stavanger Aerodrome, Norway on the 30th April 1940. The aircraft took off from RAF Newmarket Heath at 18:00hrs but disappeared over the North Sea.

All six crew were posted as "missing presumed dead", however, all six bodies were recovered, having been washed ashore

Wireless Op/Air Gunner Michael John O'Sullivan is the only casualty from the aircraft buried here.
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CWGC West Row Baptist Chapelyard - West Row, Suffolk, Saturday 14th November 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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SuffolkBlue
Posts: 1390
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Location: Bury St. Edmunds

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 07/12/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

With the restrictions slowly being lifted, I recently took the opportunity of visiting a few more CWGC sites across Shropshire, Cheshire & Staffordshire. It meant a very early start to fit in all of the locations in a day (with no overnight stays permitted!), so I arrived at my first location at sunrise.

Donington (St Cuthbert) Churchyard is located just a couple of miles from RAF Cosford. It contains two First World War burials with 23 burials from the Second World War.

The churchyard also contains 43 post war service burials, most of them RAF.

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CWGC Donington (St Cuthbert) Churchyard - Donington, Albrighton, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Leading Aircraftmen Miroslav Drnek & Leading Aircraftman Josef Melena were killed on the 21st July 1941 when their Airspeed Oxford V3973 developed a technical error while on a training flight. The aircraft crashed into a block of flats in Wolverhampton.
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CWGC Donington (St Cuthbert) Churchyard - Donington, Albrighton, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Donington (St Cuthbert) Churchyard - Donington, Albrighton, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Edward Douglas Featherstone-Wilson died from injuries sustained on the 16th June 1942 flying in Supermarine Spitfire I X4329 which hit a tree whilst attempting to make a forced landing near Duddleston, Birmingham.
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CWGC Donington (St Cuthbert) Churchyard - Donington, Albrighton, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Frederick George Sherriff OBE MC was a British fencer who was an officer in the British Army and later the Royal Air Force.

He competed at two Olympic Games, in the men's team foil, at Paris in 1924 and Amsterdam in 1928.

He had served in the First World War in the York and Lancaster Regiment and continued into the Second as a Royal Air Force officer, ultimately Group Captain.

Public Record Office Air 2/326 has recommendation for an OBE dated 19 March 1928. It was clearly intended for the King's Birthday List of that year; he was still a Squadron Leader.

"In his duties in connection with physical training, Squadron Leader Sherriff mixes a great deal with the other Services and has at all times very creditably represented the Royal Air Force. He invariably considers the Service point of view and always endeavours to further the interest of the Service to which he belongs. He has brought it great credit through his activities in the fencing world, having been amateur champion, but I consider the greatest credit is due to him for the excellent work he has done in preparing Royal Air Force representative parties for the Royal Tournament at Olympia annually, which have brought great credit to the Royal Air Force because of his very capable training."

The Times of 15 February 1943 carried a letter from an unidentified correspondent that read:

"His numerous friends in the Royal Air Force, and in particular many thousands of officers commissioned for ground duties since the outbreak of war, learned with sorrow of the unexpected death in hospital of Group Captain F.O. Sherriff, OBE, MC. Before he retired from regular service in the rank of Wing Commander he was specially known for his personal success and great interest in sport and physical training; his fencing prowess was widely recognized. He was also known to the public by his appearances in command of RAF detachments at such ceremonies as that held on Armistice Day at the Cenotaph. In the early days of the war he was given the task of training newly commissioned officers in the non-flying branches of the service. This task he carried out until within a week of his death with unflagging enthusiasm and energy. He will be vividly remembered by all those who have been under his command as the personification of the soldierly virtues of smartness, discipline and uncompromising devotion to duty - an upright man in every sense of the word. Those who were privileged to work with him on his staff will cherish the memory of an ideal commanding officer and a friend whose sympathy and understanding bound them to him with very close ties. He communicated to all his intense love of the service - to work with him was an inspiration."

He died at Cosford Hospital on the 31st January 1943.
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CWGC Donington (St Cuthbert) Churchyard - Donington, Albrighton, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Quentin MacPhail Shippee hailed from Saskatchewan in Canada and after spending his early years in the US he returned to Canada, graduated at Westmount High School and joined the RCAF.

On the 19th March 1943, he was flying at 300ft in Hawker Typhoon DN444 when he spun whilst in a turn and lost control, crashing into an orchard near Madeley, Shropshire.
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CWGC Donington (St Cuthbert) Churchyard - Donington, Albrighton, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr
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CWGC Donington (St Cuthbert) Churchyard - Donington, Albrighton, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr



39 casualties from both world wars are buried at Shawbury (St. Mary the Virgin) Churchyard, most of which are airmen from the RAF base or who lost their lives in crashes in the local vicinity.
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CWGC Shawbury (St. Mary the Virgin) Churchyard - Shawbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Maurice Charles Cotterell was the eldest son of Charles Cotterell and Dorothy Cotterell of Leamington Road, Broadway. He was born in Broadway on the 16th March 1912.

After leaving Prince Henry’s School, Maurice worked at Russell’s, for the furniture designer Sir Gordon Russell, in the village before joining the RAF. He served at RAF Halton, Buckinghamshire, with 90 Squadron as a Sergeant-Pilot.

Maurice was killed, aged 27, in an air crash on the 23rd March 1940. He was piloting a Bristol Blenheim IV L4873 when it flew into Foel Wen in the Berwyn Mountains, Wales, after breaking formation from two other aircraft after entering cloud. All three members of the crew, Maurice, Sergeant Observer Ronald J. Harbour and Aircraftman 2nd Class Kenneth C. Winterton (Wireless Operator/Air Gunner) were killed instantly.
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CWGC Shawbury (St. Mary the Virgin) Churchyard - Shawbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Thomas Colvin Watson was killed whilst flying Avro Anson I, N5019 of No 15 OTU on the 10th July 1940, which crashed into Y Gamrhiv in Radnorshire during a night navigation exercise.

Pilot James Rex was also killed on the same day when Bristol Blenheim R3881 of 59 Squadron crashed in Shropshire returning from a reconnaissance mission over Le Havre.
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CWGC Shawbury (St. Mary the Virgin) Churchyard - Shawbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Reginald Basil Wright was killed whilst flying Airpseed Oxford I, R6287 of No 11 SFTS, when it dived into the ground at night near RAF Shawbury on the 6th December 1940.
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CWGC Shawbury (St. Mary the Virgin) Churchyard - Shawbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Observer Bruce Adams Coukell from High Bridge, New Jersey, U.S.A, took off from RAF Upwood in Bristol Blenheim lV R3875 on a Cross-Country exercise on the 7th September 1941.

His aircraft entered a spin at 2,500 feet and crashed circa 1200 into a tree at Cressage, 8 miles from Shrewsbury. His 2 crew members were also killed.
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CWGC Shawbury (St. Mary the Virgin) Churchyard - Shawbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Flying Officer Melville John Kingshott was born in West Brunswick, Victoria, Australia.

His aircraft, Bristol Blenheim IV P6959, crashed near Shrewsbury on a cross country exercise from RAF Upwood on the 3rd January 1942.
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CWGC Shawbury (St. Mary the Virgin) Churchyard - Shawbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr


F/O John A.C. BROWN - 83331 - the Rugby Advertiser of February 10th 1942 reported the following:

Flying Officer's Death

The driver of the lorry was exonerated at the inquest at Rugby, last Friday, on Flying Officer John Albert Campbell Brown, 2, Coniston Road, Harlescott, Shrewsbury, who was killed when the car he was driving came into collision with a lorry on the London Road, near the Autos Cafe, the previous Friday.

John Reginald Worsdale...said that at about 11.15 a.m. he was driving an eight wheeled lorry at about 16 to 18 mp.h. towards Coventry. He saw a vehicle approachingat a normal speed, then a car came out from behind this with the obvious intention of passing it, and skidded right across the road to get in front of it. Witness attempted to get his lorry on the grass verge, but could not avoid the car.
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CWGC Shawbury (St. Mary the Virgin) Churchyard - Shawbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Richard Richard Francis Christopher served as 2nd Lieutenant in the Royal Irish Fusiliers in 1939 and commissioned into the Royal Air Force in 1940,.

He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross while serving as a Flight Lieutenant in Royal Air Force No.170 Squadron; citation from Air Ministry Bulletin 12962, as follows:

"Flight Lieutenant Garvey has taken part in a large number of operational sorties and photographic reconnaissances, achieving some excellent results. In June 1943, whilst on a shipping reconnaissance, he sighted and photographed a large convoy of enemy shipping as a result of which five enemy vessels were sunk. Recently this officer completed five special photographic missions very successfully. He has, at all times, displayed enthusiasm, courage and a fine fighting spirit."


Air Ministry, 17th November, 1944.

The KING has been graciously pleased to approve the following awards in recognition of gallantry displayed in flying operations against the enemy.


Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross

Flight Lieutenant Richard Francis Christopher GARVEY, D.F.C. (44811), R.A.F., 541 Sqn.

This officer has completed numerous reconnaissance sorties, setting an example of great courage and devotion to duty. In October, 1944, was detailed to obtain photographs of a certain objective. After completing his photographic runs Flight Lieutenant Garvey noticed two enemy fighters behind him. Their leader opened fire. Flight Lieutenant Garvey spiralled almost to ground level, pulling out of his dive at the last moment. His attacker, who had followed him down, dived into a wood and burst into flames. This incident is characteristic of the skill and determination consistently displayed by this officer.

He lost his life on the 14th January 1948 in de Havilland Mosquito NF Mk 30 NT552. He was on a ferry flight to RAF Shawbury and on final approach to land the port wing dropped and the aircraft yawed to port and dived steeply into the ground. The port wing struck first and the aircraft cartwheeled and disintegrated. It is suspected that the port engine did not pick up when the pilot advanced the throttles during the approach and this caused the initial wing drop and yaw. However, the breaking up of the aircraft made it impossible to determine the true cause of the accident.
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CWGC Shawbury (St. Mary the Virgin) Churchyard - Shawbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Sergeant Maurice Daniel Duggan was on board Airspeed Oxford I L4603 performing a circular training flight at Blackpool Airport on the 17th May 1942. On final approach, the twin engine aircraft collided with another Oxford, X7063, with one pilot on board as well. Following the collision, both aircraft dove into the ground and crashed near a residential area located near the airport. Both pilots on both aircraft were killed.
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CWGC Shawbury (St. Mary the Virgin) Churchyard - Shawbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Sgt Marian Krenz was killed when his Supermarine Spitfire II P8095 of 61 Operational Training Unit hit a tree in fog at Grub Street, High Offley, Staffordshire, on the 17th April 1944.
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CWGC Shawbury (St. Mary the Virgin) Churchyard - Shawbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr



Shrewsbury General Cemetery is the largest CWGC site in Shropshire, at 274 casualties. There were military hospitals in Shrewsbury and the surrounding area during both wars. The 125 burials from the First World War are scattered throughout the old part of Shrewsbury General Cemetery with a large group towards the eastern end.

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CWGC Shrewsbury General Cemetery - Shrewsbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Shrewsbury General Cemetery - Shrewsbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Shrewsbury General Cemetery - Shrewsbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr


There is a war graves plot in the newer part which contains more than half of the 94 Second World War burials. The rest are scattered.

The cemetery also contains 53 war graves of other nationalities, mostly German and Italian. There were a number of prisoner of war camps in the area, including one at Shelton Road, Shrewsbury.
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CWGC Shrewsbury General Cemetery - Shrewsbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Shrewsbury General Cemetery - Shrewsbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Shrewsbury General Cemetery - Shrewsbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Shrewsbury General Cemetery - Shrewsbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 3rd March 1943, the crew of Avro Lancaster I W4864 were taking part in a night time training mission from RAF Breighton. They encountered bad weather and crashed close to RAF Shawbury. Pilot Edgar Claude Fulton of Kingston, Canberra and his 6 crew members were all killed.
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CWGC Shrewsbury General Cemetery - Shrewsbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Sergeant John Edward Brumwell died at RAF Lossiemouth on the 7th October 1943 due to a fractured skull, the result of a 'propeller accident'.He is buried here in his home town.
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CWGC Shrewsbury General Cemetery - Shrewsbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Shrewsbury General Cemetery - Shrewsbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr
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CWGC Shrewsbury General Cemetery - Shrewsbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Alan John Francis was the son of Edwin John and Clara Winifred Francis, of Shrewsbury.
On the 16th May 1943, he took off in Short Stirling I BF398 from RAF Newmarket on a night time training mission.
Both outer engines failed, leading the crew to partially abandon the aircraft, and he was killed after baling out.
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CWGC Shrewsbury General Cemetery - Shrewsbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 15th February 1944 , the crew of Armstrong Whitworth Whitley V BD420 were taking part in a glider towing training flight when the aircraft crashed into rising ground in turbulent weather, killing all on board. The glider it was towing (Airspeed Horsa HA433) was successfully released & force-landed nearby.
Crew:
F/Sgt Ronald Richmond BROUN (417013) RNZAF - Chester (Blacon) Cemetery
W/O Edward Alan CREBER (936235) RAFVR - Shrewsbury General Cemetery
Sgt Jack Thomas BROWNHILL (1715949) RAFVR - Twickenham Cemetery
Sgt Reginald Frederick HODGES (R/170348) RCAF - Chester (Blacon) Cemetery
Sgt Henry LITTLE (1593467), 20, RAFVR - Harrogate (Stonefall) Cemetery

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CWGC Shrewsbury General Cemetery - Shrewsbury, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The majority of the war graves at Oswestry General Cemetery are in Section T. The remainder of the war graves are either in a single row to the west of this plot or scattered throughout the rest of the cemetery.

The cemetery contains 53 First World War burials (made mainly from the large Oswestry Military Hospital at Park Hall Camp) and 39 Second World War burials.

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CWGC Oswestry General Cemetery - Oswestry, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Officer Philip Anthony Crush was killed on the 18th July 1940 during a mid-air collision between North American Harvard N7159 and N7158.
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CWGC Oswestry General Cemetery - Oswestry, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot John Michael Kassaneff was killed whilst flying in Miles Master III, DL611 of No 61 OTU, which flew into the ground near Ellesmere in Shropshire on the 13th September 1942.
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CWGC Oswestry General Cemetery - Oswestry, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Anthony Pensa was killed whilst flying in Miles Master III, W9003 of No 61 OTU, when it broke up in the air near Oswestry on the 4th May 1942.
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CWGC Oswestry General Cemetery - Oswestry, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 26th January 1943, the crew of Vickers Wellington IC R1491 were taking part in a night navigation exercise from RAF Harwell.
The aircraft was seen on fire before it struck a hillside and then a farmhouse at Llansilin, Denbighshire. Air Bomber John Simpson Todd and all of his crew lost their lives.
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CWGC Oswestry General Cemetery - Oswestry, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 22nd April 1944, Pilot Leslie James Friend was at the controls of Supermarine Spitfire I R6623 during a mock dogfight against another Spitfire, a mark V W3364 flown by Sergeant Barry.

Barry dived, rolled & then pulled up sharply to rejoin the 'battle' and in pulling up hit the R6623.

The tail of R6623 was clipped & enough damage was caused to send the aircraft into a short dive and crashed in open farmland a mile west of Selattyn.
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CWGC Oswestry General Cemetery - Oswestry, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Oswestry General Cemetery - Oswestry, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The very large Hawarden (St. Deiniol) Churchyard contains 57 First and Second World War casualties, most of which are in a war grave plot at the far end of the churchyard.

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CWGC Hawarden (St. Deiniol) Churchyard - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 29th January 1943, Pilot John Hugh Dyer was at the controls of Supermarine Spitfire IIa P7430 when the engine failed. He attempted a forced landing near Mostyn, Flintshire, but was killed in the subsequent crash.
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CWGC Hawarden (St. Deiniol) Churchyard - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot David Ralph Reynolds and Engineer Leslie Gordon Boyens were flying in a Miles Martinet TT Mk 1, NR482 of No 48 Maintenance Unit Sqn, on the 15th August 1949.

Their aircraft spun into the ground near Corwen, possibly as a result of the pilot suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning.
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CWGC Hawarden (St. Deiniol) Churchyard - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Stanley Wyard Bradshaw was killed on the 7th December 1941 whilst flying in Supermarine Spitfire I, R7126 of No 57 OTU, which flew into a tree and exploded after control was lost in a snowstorm at Chester.
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CWGC Hawarden (St. Deiniol) Churchyard - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 17th July 1942, Lockheed Hudson I N7253 took off from RAF Sydenham with 13 occupants on board for a flight to RAF Hendon. On route, the aircraft came down near Llanfair Dyffryn Clwyd, Denbighshire.
It was later established that the cause of the accident was structural failure involving the port wing of the aircraft. The reason for the failure was unknown, but it was considered possible that the aircraft was struck by lightning.

Charles Arthur Coatman was one of those killed on board.
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CWGC Hawarden (St. Deiniol) Churchyard - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On 17th June 1941, Pilot George Robert Cushon was killed when he hit a hanger on take off from RAF Hawarden in Supermarine Spitfire L1088.
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CWGC Hawarden (St. Deiniol) Churchyard - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

During a training exercise from RAF Hawarden on the 28th August 1940, Supermarine Spitfire I L1060, flown by Pilot Michael Ernest Brian Macassey, stalled and crashed onto the beach at Hoylake, Wirral.
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CWGC Hawarden (St. Deiniol) Churchyard - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Officer J F N Fairbanks and M M Restell-Little were killed on the 19th May 1933 when their Avro 504N's, J8676 and J8533, of No 5 FTS, collided with each other on approach to Sealand.
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CWGC Hawarden (St. Deiniol) Churchyard - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

John Neville Woodbine Parish was the youngest of the five children of Lt.-Col. Francis Woodbine Parish and his wife, Dorothy Mary Catherine Drew. She was the daughter of Mary Gladstone, a daughter of the former Prime Minister, W.E. Gladstone.

He was killed when his Hawker Hurricane of 759 Squadron crashed in the River Parrett on 17th May 1941.
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CWGC Hawarden (St. Deiniol) Churchyard - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

William Glynne Charles Gladstone was a Liberal Party politician and the last of four generations of Gladstones to serve in the House of Commons, the first being his great-grandfather Sir John Gladstone. His body was the last to be officially repatriated to the United Kingdom during the First World War.

In 1909, Gladstone was the Assistant Private Secretary to John Hamilton-Gordon, Earl of Aberdeen who was serving as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. In 1911, he served for a few months at the British Embassy in Washington, D.C., as an honorary attaché to Lord Bryce.

He stood as the Liberal Party candidate in the Kilmarnock Burghs by-election held on the 26th September 1911 and was elected as the Member of Parliament (MP). A whip in Asquith's government, he served only 4 years in Parliament.

Gladstone was commissioned into the British Army on the 15th August 1914 as a second lieutenant.

On the 13th April 1915, he was killed in action near Laventie,(three weeks after arriving in France) by a sniper. He was initially buried in France, but permission was granted by King George V for his body to be brought back to the United Kingdom. Nine days after his death, his body was disinterred and re-buried in the churchyard of St Deiniol's.
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CWGC Hawarden (St. Deiniol) Churchyard - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hawarden (St. Deiniol) Churchyard - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the opposite side of the road to the churchyard is Hawarden Cemetery, with 42 casualties buried in a war grave plot here.

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CWGC Hawarden Cemetery - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Boeing Washington B. WF502 was taken on charge on the 15th January 1951 and assigned to 90 Squadron, RAF Marham.

On the 30th July 1945, a 10 man crew were performing a training sortie from RAF Marham. While cruising at night at an altitude of 19,000 feet, control of the aircraft was apparently lost and it went into an irrecoverable dive. While plunging the aircraft disintegrated and eventually crashed in an open field near Llanarmon-yn-Iâl, 3.5 miles east-southeast of Ruthin, Denbighshire.

The debris was found in an area of more than five acres and all ten occupants had been killed. The crew was unable to send any sort of 'Mayday' message.

Crew of WF502:
Squadron Leader William Rutherford Sloane (pilot)
Pilot Officer Cecil Brian Speller (Co-pilot)
Pilot Officer Michael Jackson Lightowler (Navigator)
Sergeant Edward Frank Wheeler (Air Gunner)
Sergeant Kenneth Albert Reakes (Air Gunner)
Sergeant Robert Frazer Smeddon Anderson (Air Signaller)
Sergeant Edward David Pearton (Navigator)
Flight Sergeant Anthony Martin (Flight Engineer)
Sergeant Maurice John James Clifton (Air Gunner)
Sergeant Robert Greig Hughson (Air Gunner)
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CWGC Hawarden Cemetery - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

ImageCWGC Hawarden Cemetery - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 28th October 1941, Sergeant Pierre van Boxtel was flying in Miles Master I T8331 from RAF Hawarden representing an enemy aircraft to be attacked.

At 15:00hrs, he was landing with permission from flight control. A Spitfire came in to land at the same time and collided with the Master, with both aircraft coming down close to the runway.

van Boxtel was rushed to Chester Hospital suffering severe burns and a fractured spine. He passed away there at 21:00hrs
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CWGC Hawarden Cemetery - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Joseph Edward Leo Cantin was killed on the 28th April 1943 whilst flying in North American Mustang I, AG502 of No 41 OTU, which flew into the ground following an engine failure whilst flying at low level.
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CWGC Hawarden Cemetery - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 11th April 1942, Supermarine Spitfire IIa P7990 of 57 Operational Training Unit crashed near RAF Hawarden for unknown reasons, killing the pilot James Patrick Consideine Jnr.
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CWGC Hawarden Cemetery - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 2nd November 1941, Supermarine Spitfire I N3066 was involved in a mid air collision with Spitfire P9559, both of the 57 Operational Training Unit.

Both pilots involved, Pilot Officer Hendrik Pronk and Pilot Pierre Louis Marie Morau, were killed.
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CWGC Hawarden Cemetery - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hawarden Cemetery - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wing Commander Malcolm Morgan McMullan lost his life in the same crash involving Lockheed Hudson I N7253 that came down near Llanfair Dyffryn Clwyd, on the 17th July 1942.
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CWGC Hawarden Cemetery - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Officer Raphael Rex Heathcote took off from RAF Hawarden in North American Mustang I AP199 on the 14th January 1943 for a practice low level sortie.

The pilot was authorised to operate in the vicinity of the small town of Wem in Shropshire. The plane's ETA back at Hawarden was 15:00hrs.

The Mustang failed to return and was found to have crashed at Whitchurch, along with Mustang Mark I AG515.

As the two aircraft had been assigned different routes it appeared that the two pilots had met up in the course of their flights for a session of unauthorised formation flying or practice air combat and had collided.

Both pilots were killed and a person on the ground was seriously injured by a machine gun which smashed through the roof of a garage in which she was standing.
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CWGC Hawarden Cemetery - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot John Alexander Gilbert lost his life on the 10th October 1942 when his Supermarine Spitfire I, X4605 of No 57 OTU, spun into the ground near Ewloe in Flintshire.
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CWGC Hawarden Cemetery - Hawarden, Flintshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr
Last edited by SuffolkBlue on Wed 14 Apr 2021, 3:15 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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SuffolkBlue
Posts: 1390
Joined: Sun 31 Aug 2008, 7:31 pm
Location: Bury St. Edmunds

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 07/12/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

Chester (Blacon) Cemetery was a new cemetery in 1940 when the authorities set aside two plots for service burials. The larger plot in section 'A' was used as a Royal Air Force regional cemetery by a number of RAF stations in Cheshire and the adjoining counties. Only airmen are buried in it.

The smaller plot in section 'H' was used for Commonwealth burials and for the burial of servicemen from the numerous Polish hospitals and camps in the area. Almost all of the war graves are in one or other of these plots. The cemetery contains 461 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 1 of which is an unidentified airman of the Royal Air Force. Of the 97 war graves of other nationalities, 86 are Polish. There also are 2 Non World War service burials here.

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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator Thomas Daniel Lawley of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, lost his life on the 30th April 1945 when his Avro Lancaster X KB879 broke up in flight and crashed at Hixon, near Stafford, on a training mission.
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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Air Bomber Crafton Dudley Wong of Kingston, Jamaica, was on board Vickers Wellington X LP729 during a cross country exercise on the 4th January 1945. The starboard engine failed at cruising altitude and the crew were making for RAF Wheaton Aston but the aircraft crashed at Church Eaton, near Stafford. The five other crew members also lost their lives.
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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Vickers Wellington X LN428 crashed on the 20th November 1944 crashed near Oakengates, Salop, during a training mission from RAF Market Harborough, with the loss of the 5 man crew.
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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 12th December 1941, Air Gunner John Sven Overland was on a cross-country flying exercise from RAF Dishforth in Handley Page Halifax V LL541 when the aircraft disintegrated in flight and crashed near Rhayader, Radnor.
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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 22nd October 1944, Handley Page Halifax V LL505 crashed on Great Carrs near Coniston, Lake District, while on a cross-country flying exercise from RAF Topcliffe.

All 8 of the crew, including Wireless Operator Calvin George Whittingstall, were killed.
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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Handley Page Halifax II JD417 entered cloud and crashed on Yr Eifl, near Caernarfon, on the 3rd September 1944 while on a navigation exercise from RAF Lindholme. Pilot Lindsay George Walker of Kirribilli, New South Wales, Australia, was one of six casualties.
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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Navigator Daniel Titleman of Montreal Province of Quebec, Canada, was on board Vickers Wellington X HZ715 from RAF Stratford upon Avon for a cross country exercise on the 16th June 1944.

His aircraft crashed into a cloud-covered Red Pike overlooking Buttermere in the Lake District, with the Wellington hitting the mountain only feet below the summit.

He and the rest of his crew were all killed.
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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wing Commander David Neville Milligan DFC took off in Bristol Beaufighter IC T4772 at 10:05hrs on the 18th Januatry 1944 for a practice flight and failed to return. His aircraft was found six days later 500 feet up 1300-foot high Crew Crag, 2 miles from Bewcastle. The weather at the time of the accident had been poor with 9/10ths cloud.
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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Navigator Raymond Thomas Bowen lost his life on the 13th September 1943 when Vickers Wellington III BJ664 crashed during a violent thunderstorm near Ludlow while on a navigation exercise from RAF Chipping Warden.
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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 13th September 1943, Vickers Wellington III BJ664 crashed during a violent thunderstorm near Ludlow while on a navigation exercise from RAF Chipping Warden, claiming the life of pilot J E Fairchild and his crew.
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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator George Hiram van Every was killed on the 23rd July 1944 whilst flying in Vickers Wellington X, LP567 of No 83 OTU, when it came down in the sea off the Welsh coast during a night navigation exercise.
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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 21st August 1944, the crew of Vickers Wellington X MF517 took off from RAF Bramcote for a navigational training sortie. Surface wind at take off was 11 mph, visibility was good and the cloud ceiling was 2000 feet.

The aircraft failed to return and it later transpired that is had crashed at Newtown Farm, Rubery, near Halesowen, Worcestershire.
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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Chester (Blacon) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the other side of the city is Chester (Overleigh) Cemetery, which contains 129 First World War burials, about half of them made from local hospitals including the Chester War Hospital which was housed in the Infirmary building. The majority of the burials are scattered throughout the cemetery but there is a small war graves plot made up of 32 graves from both wars.

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CWGC Chester (Overleigh) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Chester (Overleigh) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Second Lieutenant Kenneth Alonzo Nelson died from injuries sustained on the on the 22nd May 1918 whilst flying Sopwith Dolphin, C3915 of No 4 Training Depot Station when it spun into the ground.
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CWGC Chester (Overleigh) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Chester (Overleigh) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Chester (Overleigh) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Not the most accessible grave!
ImageCWGC Chester (Overleigh) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Chester (Overleigh) Cemetery - Chester, Cheshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The 24 First World War burials in Whitchurch Cemetery are scattered through the site. The Second World War burials, 15 of them Commonwealth and 52 of them Polish and Czech, are mostly in a war grave plot at the far end of the cemetery.
The Polish burials were made from No 4 Polish General Hospital which was established at Iscoyal Park, three miles west of Whitchurch.
Construction of a RAF Tilstock, also known as Whitfield (Tilstock) Airfield, was completed by mid-1942. Between September 1942 and January 1946, the airfield was used by No. 81 Operational Training Unit and No. 1665 Heavy Conversion Unit Royal Air Force for the training of pilots and crews in Whitley, Stirling and Halifax heavy bombers. During the 1950s, Auster AOP.6 and Auster T.7 aircraft of No. 663 (AOP) Squadron RAF used the facilities of the otherwise non-operational airfield during weekends for liaison flights with Royal Artillery units on training exercises.
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CWGC Whitchurch Cemetery - Whitchurch, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On a daytime training mission from RAF Tilstock on the 31st January 1944, the crew of Armstrong Whitworth Whitley V, LA765, descended through cloud in an effort to determine their position and inadvertently hit high ground. Their aircraft caught fire and burned out.

Air Bomber George Victor Bourne was one of three crew members killed.
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CWGC Whitchurch Cemetery - Whitchurch, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Alfred Edward Davis was killed whilst flying in Vickers Wellington X, NC921 of No 81 OTU, on the 18th May 1945. The aircraft crashed at Sleap as it made an overshoot to land on the correct runway but an engine failed as it did so.
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CWGC Whitchurch Cemetery - Whitchurch, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Whitchurch Cemetery - Whitchurch, Shropshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr


In the village of Tillstock is Tilstock (Christ Church) Churchyard, which has a small war grave plot in a quiet corner of the churchyard.
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CWGC Tilstock (Christ Church) Churchyard - Tilstock, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr


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CWGC Tilstock (Christ Church) Churchyard - Tilstock, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Tilstock (Christ Church) Churchyard - Tilstock, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

A short walk down the High Street is the Churchyard Extension, which also has a small war grave plot.

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CWGC Tilstock (Christ Church) Churchyard Extension - Tilstock, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Gunner Walter Herford was admitted to the military hospital at Prees Heath, Salop, on the 10th September 1917 suffering from tuberculosis of lung, pleurisy & tubercular pneumonia.

He was reported as dangerously ill on the 3rd October and died at 12.05pm the next day,
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CWGC Tilstock (Christ Church) Churchyard Extension - Tilstock, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Corporal Albert Morgan was sent sick to the military hospital at Prees Heath on the 23rd December 1917 suffering from gastritis.

He died on the 10th February 1918.

The Red Cross Wounded & Missing file for Corporal Albert Morgan contains a request from the Red Cross on behalf of the relatives in Australia to obtain the fullest details possible of the wounds, death & burial of Corporal Albert Morgan. A letter from O.C. Commanding No. 5 (T) Squadron, A.F.C. Minchinhampton near Chalford, Gloucestershire reads: “Re No 1130 Cpl. A. Morgan, A.F.C. I have been in communication with an intimate friend of his, Sergt. T. P. Cronin of the squadron, who states that Cpl. A. Morgan was first taken ill in December and was sent to Prees Heath Military Hospital and was a patient there for about three weeks, After he had been discharged a fortnight he was taken ill again two days before he died. He reported to the Medical Officer on 9th February, and was detained in the Camp Hospital for observation and was sent to Prees heath Hospital on the morning of the 10th February at 7.30 o’clock and he died on the way there.

Sergt. Cronin states that the Doctor told him he died as the result of perforation of the bowels.
The funeral took place on 13th February and as many members of the Squadron as could be spared were present,
He was given full military honours and was buried in the Australian Section of the Cemetery at Prees Heath. His next of kin (cousin) Mr Jenkin Morgan was present.”
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CWGC Tilstock (Christ Church) Churchyard Extension - Tilstock, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Second Lieutenant Reginald James Thomas Forsyth took off from Tern Hill Aerodrome, Shropshire on the 20th January 1918 in Sopwith Pup B/6089 to participate in a formation flight.
Hi aircraft crashed shortly after and was admitted to the military hospital at Prees Heath in a serious condition.

A Court of Inquiry was held at Tern Hill on the 26th January 1918.

FIRST WITNESS – No. (Aus) 1348 2nd A/M/ Dunne W. J. states:
I am the rigger in charge of Sopwith Pup No. B/6089. I looked over the rigging on the morning on the 20th instant and found everything to be correct.

SECOND WITNESS – No. (Aus) 1314 1st A/M/ Drain P. J. states:
I am the fitter in charge of Sopwith Pup No. B/6089. I examined the engine in the machine on the morning of the 20th instant and found it to be in perfect working order.

THIRD WITNESS – Lieut. A. F. G. Stafford, A.F.C. states:
I am Flying Officer and was Acting Flight Commander on the 20th inst. I ordered Lt. Forsyth to take up Sopwith Pup B/6089 at 2 pm to take part in a formation flight. The formation had made one circuit of the aerodrome and was flying
into wind when Lt. Forsyth got ahead of the formation, and in turning back did a vertical bank, his machine slipped, the nose dropped and the machine got into a slow spin. He succeeded in getting out of this, but could not get machine under full control before hitting the ground. The formation was flying at about 1000 feet.

There was a strong wind blowing at the time. Lt. Forsyth is a Service Pilot and has stunted this machine including spinning, before.

FOURTH WITNESS – Captain C. F. White R.A.M.C. states:
I am the Medical Officer attending at Tern Hill Aerodrome. At about 2.30 pm on the 20th instant I examined Lieut. Forsyth. He was unconscious and had a severe scalp wound, fracture of the skull, severe contusion both eyes and a compound comminuted fracture of the right ankle and foot. I sent him to Prees Heath Military Hospital.

FIFTH WITNESS – Major J. A. C. Cowper, A.F.C. states:
I am Squadron Comm, of the 6th Training Squadron, A.F.C. I examined the wreckage of machine B/6089 Sopwith Pup on the 20th instant and found evidence of the Pilot having been sick in the air.

FINDING – The Court having carefully considered the evidence are of the opinion that the accident was caused by the Pilot being overcome with nausea and sickness in the air, the machine thereby becoming out of control.

It is further considered that no blame can be attached to the Mechanics in charge of the machine or the Instructor who instructed the Pupil.

He died at 6.30 am on the 16th February 1918.
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CWGC Tilstock (Christ Church) Churchyard Extension - Tilstock, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr
RAF Tern Hill was an airfield located near the towns of Newport and Market Drayton.
The airfield was first opened in 1916 and was initially operated by the Royal Flying Corps before being taken over by its successor, the Royal Air Force, in April 1918.
In 1935, airfield was re-built and three Type 'C' hangars were erected on the main airfield. The first based flying unit was No.10 Flying Training School which formed in January 1936 and remained until it was transferred to Canada in late 1940.
The first based operational squadron was No. 78 Squadron RAF which flew from Tern Hill as a detachment flying the Armstrong Whitworth Whitley IVA from June 1939 until August 1939.
Tern Hill then turned into a fighter airfield with Supermarine Spitfires and Hawker Hurricanes with the first fighter squadron arriving in October 1939.
The last fighter squadron to be posted to Tern Hill was No. 131 Squadron RAF which arrived in August 1941 with their Spitfire IA and IIA's before leaving in September 1941.
The airfield then began to host training units such as No. 5 (Pilot) Advanced Flying Unit which arrived in April 1942 and left in April 1946.
The station closed in 1976, with the technical and administrative site transferring to the British Army to become Borneo Barracks, later renamed Clive Barracks (after Major-General Robert Clive). The airfield part of the site was retained by the RAF and is now known as Tern Hill Airfield. It is predominately used as a relief landing ground for helicopters of the No 1 Flying Training School, based at RAF Shawbury. The airfield is also home to the RAF's No. 632 Volunteer Gliding Squadron.
The nearby Stoke-Upon-Tern (St. Peter) Church Cemetery contains burials from servicemen lost flying from the airfield or nearby.
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CWGC Stoke-Upon-Tern (St. Peter) Church Cemetery - Stoke-Upon-Tern, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

U/T Pilot Harold Walter Harris Joseph was killed on the 17th December 1940 whilst flying Miles Master I, N7691 of No 5 SFTS, which crashed on take off from RAF Ternhill as a result of icing.
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CWGC Stoke-Upon-Tern (St. Peter) Church Cemetery - Stoke-Upon-Tern, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Second Lieutenant H.F. Meyer, RFC, died on the 15th October 1917. His Airco DH5 crashed two miles south of Tern Hill aerodrome when the upper right wing tip came off. Herbert Frederick Meyer, aged 29, grew up in Vernon, British Columbia.
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CWGC Stoke-Upon-Tern (St. Peter) Church Cemetery - Stoke-Upon-Tern, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Second Lieutenant S.H. Smith, RFC died on the 23rd October 1917. Flying an Airco DH5, he had engine trouble, and while trying to land back at Tern Hill stalled and crashed.
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CWGC Stoke-Upon-Tern (St. Peter) Church Cemetery - Stoke-Upon-Tern, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Second Lieutenant D.G. Scott was born in Hawick, Scotland, but the family emigrated to Toronto. He crashed his Sopwith Camel at Tern Hill aerodrome after trying to loop-the-loop too low and died on the 13th December 1917.
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CWGC Stoke-Upon-Tern (St. Peter) Church Cemetery - Stoke-Upon-Tern, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Second Lieutenant F. Jickling died on the 23rd October 1917. He was on a training flight from Tern Hill in an Avro 504A when he was in a collision with another of the squadron's aircraft. Both planes came down at Heath Field, Colehurst. The other pilot, Leslie Thomas Hogben, aged 18, was also killed and was buried at his native city of Canterbury.
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CWGC Stoke-Upon-Tern (St. Peter) Church Cemetery - Stoke-Upon-Tern, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Second Lieutenant W.J. McGinn was on a training flight from Tern Hill aerodrome when his Bristol Scout crashed near the airfield after it failed to recover from an intentional spin on the 18th February 1918.
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CWGC Stoke-Upon-Tern (St. Peter) Church Cemetery - Stoke-Upon-Tern, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

John Malcolm Cockburn was killed in Avro Anson I N5244 of 10 FTS, RAF Ternhill on the 8th September 1940 when it stalled from a very low height and crashed.
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CWGC Stoke-Upon-Tern (St. Peter) Church Cemetery - Stoke-Upon-Tern, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

U/T Pilot Peter William Sampson was killed whilst flying in Miles Master N7490 of No 5 SFTS, which crashed at Tarporley after hitting a fence whilst low flying on the 20th April 1941.
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CWGC Stoke-Upon-Tern (St. Peter) Church Cemetery - Stoke-Upon-Tern, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 14th April 1942, the crew of Vickers Wellington IC R1085 boarded their aircraft at RAF Moreton-in-Marsh for a training flight.

During the sortie, a propeller came off. At 15:31hrs, while banking steeply to port, the Wellington stalled and crashed at Wollerton, 1 near RAF Turnhill airfield, killing the 6 man crew.
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CWGC Stoke-Upon-Tern (St. Peter) Church Cemetery - Stoke-Upon-Tern, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Air Bomber Allan Priest from Reading, Berkshire, took off from RAF Wymeswold in Vickers Wellington IC R1538 on a training flight.

The aircraft crashed at 02:15 hrs at Cellarhead. 5 miles from Stoke on Trent.

He and one other crew member lost their lives.

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CWGC Stoke-Upon-Tern (St. Peter) Church Cemetery - Stoke-Upon-Tern, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr


Stafford Cemetery contains 119 casualties from both world wars, of which most of the Second World War graves form a large war grave plot. Also buried here are a large number of German casualties, which is surprising considering the close proximity of the German cemetery at Cannock Chase.
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CWGC Stafford Cemetery - Stafford, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Air Gunner Thomas Baden Joyce and Air Gunner Eric Alfred Dean were part of a 5 man crew on Vickers Wellington III X3883 that took off from RAF Sleighford on the 28th December 1943 on a training mission.

Their aircraft crashed at Rugeley, Staffordshire following an engine fire, killing all on board.
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CWGC Stafford Cemetery - Stafford, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 11th August 1943, Vickers Wellington X HE390 was involved in a collision with a Miles Master which suddenly emerged from clouds while the Wellington was in the circuit at RAF Sleighford.

5 crew members on the Wellington were killed, including Wireless Operator Frank Powis.
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CWGC Stafford Cemetery - Stafford, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Air Bomber John Irwin Middleton was on board Vickers Wellington X HE238 when it crashed at 03:44hrs at Hanging Wicket, near RAF Hixon, Abbots Bromley on the 7th July 1943 .
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CWGC Stafford Cemetery - Stafford, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

At 0036hrs on the 26th June 1944, Handley Page Halifax V DG395 took off for an exercise of night bombing along with circuits. Approximately 10 minutes after take off authorities were notified that the aircraft had crashed in open county approximately 2 miles east of Thorne. It is believed the aircraft collided with high-tension cables. Air Bomber Edgar Charles Spane and 5 crew members were all killed.

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CWGC Stafford Cemetery - Stafford, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 9th March 1945, Wireless Operator Peter Richman was on board Handley Page Halifax NA317 when it collided with de Havilland Tiger Moth II DE473 while on approach to land at Abbots Bromley airfield. The pilot, F/Sgt Alan Reginald Edwards and his pupil, AC2 Alan John Mclaren Keay in the Tiger Moth were both killed. The Halifax, of 1665 HCU, crashed half a mile to the north. The crew were all killed: F/O J W Cairns, W/O A G Hemmings, W/O K Millard, Sgt P Richman, Sgt J Forbes, Sgt G Dinsdale.
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CWGC Stafford Cemetery - Stafford, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 3rd May 1944, Avro Lancaster III ME703 took off from RAF Elsham Wolds to attack the Mailly-le-Camp panzer tank depot.

On the mission, the aircraft was twice attacked by Junkers Ju 88 night-fighters. The first time was before reaching the target. The aircraft sustained significant damage and was rendered very difficult to control. It took the combined efforts of the pilot and the flight engineer to operate the control column while the air bomber assisted with the rudder pedals. Most of the aircraft's systems had been rendered inoperative in the attack, including the intercom, electrical and hydraulic systems. A fire broke out in the rear of the fuselage which is thought to have forced the mid-upper gunner to bale out. Air Gunner Alfred Arthur Henry Hodson was killed as a result of the damage to the rear gun turret.

Despite the damage, the crew decided to complete their mission but they had become so far off the aiming point due to evasive action that they had to go around again. Soon after they had dropped their bomb load on the target markers they came under sustained attack from another Ju 88, inflicting further damage. The flight engineer succeeded in putting out the fire in the fuselage and the wireless operator fixed his set, allowing distress calls to be issues. By the time they had regained the English coastline, the pilot had got the measure of how to control the aircraft so decided to push on to Elsham Wolds where he made a crash-landing. The starboard undercarriage collapsed and the bomber swung off the runway. Miraculously they came safely to a halt and there were no further injuries.

Alfred Arthur Henry Hodson is buried here in his home town.
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CWGC Stafford Cemetery - Stafford, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Air Gunner Leonard Tom Meadows was killed on the 8th January 1945 when his Vickers Wellington X LN166 broke up in flight and crashed at Eccleshall, Staffordshire, while on a high-level bombing training mission from RAF Hixon.
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CWGC Stafford Cemetery - Stafford, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Stafford Cemetery - Stafford, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Air Bomber Alfred Barish Levene lost his life on the 26th October 1943 when Vickers Wellington X HE696 crashed after the aircraft circled RAF Hixon for 15 minutes without making contact, then attempted to land but overshot the runway, The pilot was new to type.

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CWGC Stafford Cemetery - Stafford, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Stafford Cemetery - Stafford, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

RAF Lichfield, also known as Fradley Aerodrome, was an operational training station from 1940 until 1958. The airfield was the busiest airfield in Staffordshire during the Second World War and was a control point for all aviation traffic that passed through the Birmingham area. The airfield was closed in 1958 and the entire site was disposed of. Over the last 15 years the former aerodrome has been renamed Fradley Park, where a number of major developments have occurred, including industrial units and over 750 new homes, however virtually all of the hangars still exist and the majority have been refurbished to be used for industrial purposes.
Airmen who lost their lives in this area are buried in Fradley (St. Stephen) Churchyard.
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CWGC Fradley (St. Stephen) Churchyard - Fradley, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr
Pilot Wilfred Wilson Alexander was on board Vickers Wellington III Z1681, when it came in too low & hit a tree at RAF Lichfield on the 13th March 1943. Two other crew members also lost their lives.
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CWGC Fradley (St. Stephen) Churchyard - Fradley, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 3rd December 1943, Wireless Operator Ronald Henry Sankey and Pilot Reginald Ernest Mitchell were on board Vickers Wellington III X3944 when, worsening light, the bomber crashed within sight of RAF Lichfield while on a bullseye exercise.

Two other crew members also lost their lives.
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CWGC Fradley (St. Stephen) Churchyard - Fradley, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Air Bomber Joseph Henry Rogerson was on board Vickers Wellington IC X9706 when, during a night bombing exercise, the compass failed in bad weather and the aircraft crashed near RAF Lichfield on the 17th January 1942.
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CWGC Fradley (St. Stephen) Churchyard - Fradley, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 26th February 1942, Air Gunner William Allen Godfrey was killed when his Vickers Wellington IC Z8785 suffered an engine failed and aircraft crash-landed at RAF Lichfield. The other crew members survived.
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CWGC Fradley (St. Stephen) Churchyard - Fradley, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On 24th June 1941, ObLt Joachim Schwarz and his three crew members of Gruppe/Kampfgeschwader 4 based at Leeuwarden, Holland, took off at 23.00 hrs in a Heinkel 111H to lay mines in the Mersey Estuary near Liverpool.

At 02.30 hrs the Heinkel was attacked by a Bristol Beaufighter of 25 Squadron from RAF Catterick somewhere between the Wash and Liverpool and the starboard engine was put out of action.

Eventually the undercarriage dropped down increasing the drag so at 300 metres he pilot gave the order to bale out, but by the time Schwarz baled out the aircraft he was too low for his parachute to open and he was killed. The other three crew members St.Fw H.Glkowski, Obergefr F. Ertzinger and Fw W.Koller landed near Lullington 6 miles from Lichfield and were captured by the Home Guard.
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CWGC Fradley (St. Stephen) Churchyard - Fradley, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 15th December 1941, the crew of Vickers Wellington IC
R1283 boarded their aircraft at RAF Lichfield for a night navigation exercise.

During the flight, the engines began to run roughly and eventually the starboard propeller and reduction gear came off. A force-landing was attempted but the aircraft flew into trees near Chetwynd, north east of the airfield.

Pilot Bernard Poupard was the only casualty from the accident.
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CWGC Fradley (St. Stephen) Churchyard - Fradley, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the night of the 13th September 1942, the crew of Vickers Wellington IC L7815 boarded their aircraft at RAF Lichfield for a raid on Bremen.

They became airborne 23:31hrs but turned back with a faltering port engine. The aircraft stalled whilst turning finals and spun, bursting into flames on impact at 23:40 hrs. There were no survivors. The aircraft remains were guarded by a fire picquet and at 03.20hrs in the morning there was an explosion which killed LAC Ward.

The Wireless Operator James Gordon Milne and Ward are buried side by side here.
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CWGC Fradley (St. Stephen) Churchyard - Fradley, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

In the autumn of 1914, only months after the start of the First World War, construction of two large camps began on Cannock Chase. The camps (known as Brocton Camp and Rugeley Camp) were constructed with the permission of Lord Lichfield, on whose estate they were being built. The infrastructure for the camps, including the water supply, sewage systems and the roads all had to be created from scratch before work could begin on the huts and other structures.
In Rugeley (Wolseley Road) Cemetery, there is a small war grave plot for servicemen who died from these camps.

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CWGC Rugeley (Wolseley Road) Cemetery - Rugeley, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Rugeley (Wolseley Road) Cemetery - Rugeley, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Rugeley (Wolseley Road) Cemetery - Rugeley, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr




DMS Whittington, otherwise known as Defence Medical Services Whittington, is a military base in Whittington, Staffordshire, near Lichfield. It is home to the Staffordshire Regiment Museum, the Headquarters of the Surgeon General and subordinate medical headquarters, and the location of the Defence College of Health Education and Training.
The barracks were constructed on Whittington Heath. The heath had been the site of the Lichfield races which had moved from Fradley in 1702. During the 18th century they were one of the largest and well attended race meetings in the Midlands and in 1773 a grandstand was erected near the Lichfield-Tamworth Road. However, during the 19th century the popularity of the races dwindled, and military use of the heath grew. The War Office approached the Marquess of Anglesey in 1875 to buy the heath for the building of a barracks. Construction started in 1877 and the formal handing over of the newly built barracks to the military was recorded in 1881. Their creation took place as part of the Cardwell Reforms which encouraged the localisation of British military forces.

The barracks were intended to be the depot of the 38th (1st Staffordshire) Regiment of Foot and 80th Regiment of Foot (Staffordshire Volunteers). Under the Childers Reforms these regiments amalgamated to form the South Staffordshire Regiment with its depot at the barracks in 1881. They were also intended to be the depot of the 64th (2nd Staffordshire) Regiment of Foot and the 98th (Prince of Wales's) Regiment of Foot which under the same reforms amalgamated to form the North Staffordshire Regiment also in 1881.
In 1895 the last race meeting was held after the War Office declared it was "undesirable to hold a race meeting at the gate of the barracks." The Lichfield races are remembered in the names of pubs in Freeford called the Horse & Jockey and in Lichfield, The Scales which was where jockeys were "weighed in". The old grandstand became a soldiers home before it was purchased in 1957 by Whittington Heath Golf Course as its clubhouse.
During the Second World War the barracks was occupied by the United States Army and in August 1942 was designated as the 10th US Army Replacement Depot.
Whittington (St. Giles) Churchyard contains casualties from pre-First World War to the Second.


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CWGC Whittington (St. Giles) Churchyard - Whittington, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr
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CWGC Whittington (St. Giles) Churchyard - Whittington, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr
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CWGC Whittington (St. Giles) Churchyard - Whittington, Staffordshire, Sunday 4th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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SuffolkBlue
Posts: 1390
Joined: Sun 31 Aug 2008, 7:31 pm
Location: Bury St. Edmunds

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 14/04/2021**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

Another road trip, this time to the south coast for a day trip from Chichester to Hastings.

Of the 89 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, the majority of these at CWGC Chichester Cemetery are in a war grave plot constructed by the City Corporation, who also erected the War Cross. There are also 75 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War here, mainly in two adjoining Church of England dedicated Squares.

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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 27th July 1918, Sopwith Dolphin E4447, crashed and caught fire near Tangmere after the wings on the aircraft folded back and Lt George Arthur Lipsett was killed.
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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 15th Match 1941, the crew of Short Sunderland I, P9624, were recalled 5 hours into a convoy escort mission.

On landing, the aircraft stalled, crashed and sank in the Firth of Lorne. Sea conditions were calm, however a haze had built up at which made visibility for landing very difficult. 4 crew members died, presumed drowned, and the remainder injured.

The body of Wireless Operator / Ar Gunner Leslie Soden was recovered from the Firth.
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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator Herbert Edward Saxby lost his life on the 23rd December 1940 when his Bristol Blenheim IV, R2793, crashed at Radwinter, near Braintree, while returning to RAF Horsham St. Faith after attacking a target at Ostend.
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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot James Munro Smith was killed whilst flying Supermarine Spitfire VB, W3501 of No 129 Sqn, which collided with W3449 of the same unit over Sussex o the 5th October 1941.
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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 16th October 1943, Pilot Leslie Charles Morris, was killed whilst flying in Hawker Typhoon IB, JP374 of No 197 Sqn, which spun into the ground near Hambrook in Sussex.
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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot James McAllister McBride took off from RAF Tangmere on the 17th December 1943 with two "Joes" on board, bound for France.

The mission was soon aborted due to fog and his Westland Lysander IIIa V9367 crashed while he attempted to land.

The two spies survived the crash, but he was sadly killed.
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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot John De Beauvoir Holland lost his life on the 11th February 1943 from injuries he sustained whilst flying Hawker Typhoon IB, JR260, which came down off the Isle of Wight following an engine failure during a Ramrod.
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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Vojtech Lysicky was killed on the 26th February 1944, whilst flying in Supermarine Spitfire IX, MK150, which was damaged by shrapnel from its own bombs during an exercise and crashed on landing.
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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 12th February 1944, the crew of Avro Lancaster DV382, of No. 617 Squadron, landed at RAF Ford after taking part in a mission on Antheor Viaduct.

The soon became airborne again for the flight back to Lincolnshire but crashed a few minutes later on high ground at Waltham Down near Duncton.

All seven crew members were killed.

Pilot William Reid Suggit was admitted to St.Richards Hospital in Chichester where he died from his injuries on the 15th February 1944.
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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Roy Marples was born in Muswell Hill, London in 1920 and educated at Stockport Grammar School from 1928 to 1935, where he was in South House and became School Swimming Champion.

He went on to Manchester University and joined the RAF on a short service commission in January 1938.

Over Dunkirk on 1st June 1940, he damaged a He111. On the 26th he shot down a He111 off Flamborough Head and on 15th August he probably destroyed a Ju88 and shared two others.

He was shot down on the 26th August 1940 in Supermarine Spitfire R6758, force-landing near Adisham and being admitted to Kent and Canterbury Hospital with cannon shell splinter wounds in the leg. He returned to duty on 7th November 1940.

In July 1941 he went to 41 Squadron at Merston as a Flight Commander. He then joined 127 Squadron in the Western Desert on the 9th June 1942 as a Flight Commander. He shared a Me109 on 8th July and was given command of 238 Squadron on 20th July. He probably destroyed a Ju87 on 30th October and then took command of 145 Squadron in the Desert on 25th November.

He was awarded a Bar to the DFC (gazetted 5th January 1943). He shot down a Macchi C.202 Folgoreon on the 12th January 1943. After this action his own engine failed and he ditched in the sea. Two soldiers swam out from shore and helped him to land.

After coming back to England, was killed on 26th April 1944 in Supermarine Spitfire IX, MK371, when he collided with another aircraft over Washington, Sussex.
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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 23rd September 1943, the crew of Avro Lancaster III PB242 boarded their aircraft at RAF Kirmington in preparation for a raid on Neuss.

While in the air, the aircraft was severely damaged in a running battle with a Junkers Ju88 which attacked from astern and whose cannon shells damaged the wireless set and knocked out the hydraulics, putting both gun turrets out of action.

The rear gunner, Ronald Tom Hallett, was killed and the navigator Sgt. Francis Cridge and the wireless operator P/O Clifford Edwards were badly injured. Despite his injuries, Sgt. Cridge assisted the pilot in regaining the English coastline where it successfully crash-landed at RAF Manston in Kent. The aircraft was later written off.

Ronald and his crew were on their 4 operational sortie. He is buried here in his home town.
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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 11th November 1942, Pilot Emrys Aloysius Joseph Williams was killed whilst flying in Supermarine Spitfire VB, AA719 of No 131 Sqn, which collided with EN889 in cloud off the coast at Thorney Island.
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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On February 10th 1943, 29 aircraft from KG2 and II/KG40 squadrons set out on nuisance raids against the UK. These included one or two Dornier 217s making low level attacks, thus avoiding British radar. Sixteen places were attacked including Reading, Midhurst and Horsham. One Do217 of 5/KG40 was shot down by Anti Aircraft fire at Saltdean, Brighton.

The plane thought responsible for bombing Chichester was hit by light anti aircraft fire near Tangmere and crashed in fields near to The Royal Oak at Lagness, south of Chichester.

All four of the crew died in the crash, one Obergefreiter Josef Eitenauer age 25 is buried here in Chichester Cemetery. The others are interred in St Andrew’s Churchyard at Tangmere.
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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 7th March 1943, Dornier 217E code U5 + EH was one of six aircraft that took off from their base at Gilze-Rijen in Holland to join thirty one others that had taken off from forward bases in France to attack the Royal Navy fleet of large ships which the German authorities believed was anchored at Southampton Docks.

The bomber force intended to make landfall at Selsey Bill, curve round the North of Portsmouth and Southampton and make their bombing run over Southampton from the North-West to the South-East. In the event the entire raid seems to have gone wrong from the German point of view. The winds were far stronger than they had calculated and the force was scattered over Hampshire and West Sussex. When the attack did finally take place the majority of the bombs fell in rural areas well away from the Docks.

Dornier U5 + EH, captained by Feldwebel Gunter Vestewig, was intercepted by a Beaufighter night fighter from 29 Squadron based at West Malling in Kent and shot down over Fernhurst crashing in Reekes Wood. Prior to the crash, the Captain and the Navigator Gerhard Polzin baled out as did the Radio Operator Hans Witkopp. Unfortunately for him the R/O omitted to don his parachute prior to exit from the aircraft and fell to his death. His body was recovered later near the scene of the crash.

The body of the Gunner/Flight Engineer Franz Huske was not discovered and it was presumed, correctly, that his remains were buried in the crashed aircraft. The Dornier hit the ground vertically at high speed and was buried in the soft clay soil in dense woodland. Except for the initial examination of the wreck it lay undisturbed for many years visited only by aviation historians to view the artefacts remaining on the surface.

Not until 1989 was any attempt made to recover the aircraft and its bomb load which consisted of two 500kg and five 50 kg bombs. This discovery has been recognised as the largest cache of WW2 bombs ever to have been discovered in the UK.
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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Lloyd Kirstine was born on the 28th October 1912 and was a graduate of Walkerton High School, Grade 13, in 1934. Lloyd worked in the mines in Sudbury, Ontario until he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1941. He received training in Toronto and Winnipeg, was sent overseas on the 5th November 1942.

He wrote many letters home, describing England, Scotland, his army friends, the pubs, bicycling, leaves in Edinburgh, meeting King George VI and Queen Elizabeth in London, England.

He was seriously wounded on the 12th June 1943 when his Lockeed Ventura I, AE833 was hit by flak over Caen. He was hit by shrapnel in the head and never regained consciousness.
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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Thomas Edward Barker (serving as Kenneth Clift) was killed on the 19th June 1943 whilst flying in Hawker Typhoon IB, DN293 'C' of No 245 Sqn, which spun into the ground whilst pursuing a Mosquito during an air test and camera gun practice.
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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot George Cornwall English lost his life on the 3rd July 1942 when his Hawker Hurricane IIC, Z3897 spun into the ground at Bersted, Sussex, during a practice attack on another aircraft.
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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 18th November 1941, Pilot Earl Herbert Ruppel was killed when his Hawker Hurricane II, BE576, flew into high ground at night near Coombe Wood, Sussex.
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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Mr J Murphy was one of three people killed during an air raid on RAF Tangmere on the 12th March 1941.
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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Boleslaw Andrzej Wlasnowolski was born on the 29th November 1916. He served in the Polish Air Force and was with 122 Squadron when the Germans invaded on 1st September 1939. On the 2nd he shared in the shooting down of a Do17.

He arrived in England in late 1939 and was commissioned in the RAF in January 1940 and went to 6 OTU Sutton Bridge for conversion to Hurricanes. He was then posted to 32 Squadron at Biggin Hill on the 3rd August 1940.

Wlasnowolski claimed a Me109 destroyed on the 15th August and another plus a Do17 on the 18th. On 13th September he was posted to 607 Squadron at Tangmere and claimed a Do17 destroyed on the 15th. There was a further move to 213 Squadron, also at Tangmere, on 17th September. He claimed a Me109 damaged on 15th October.

Wlasnowolski was killed on the 1st November 1940 following combat with Me109’s off Portsmouth. His Hawker Hurricane V7221 came down at Liphook Game Farm, Stoughton.

He is commemorated by a memorial at the crash site of his Hurricane and on the Polish War Memorial, Northolt.
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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 17th June 1940, while descending in poor weather on approach to RAF Tangmere, Bristol Bombay I L5852 hit a hill at East Dean, north-east of Chichester, West Sussex, and disintegrated, killing all five crewmen, including Pilot Colman O'Shaughnessy Murphy.
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CWGC Chichester Cemetery - Chichester, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

RNAS Ford originally opened in March 1918 for use by RAF and American squadrons prior to closing in January 1920. The site reopened for civil flying ten years later, becoming involved in early air-to-air flight refuelling experiments, and resumed military aviation connections from the end of 1937. Fleet Air Arm training units primarily employed Ford into World War Two but their base suffered extremely heavy damage in 1940. As a result the RAF quickly returned and Ford gained prominence in its best known role as various intruder squadrons – notably No 23 – roamed enemy-occupied territory to attack targets at will with considerable success. Operational duties gradually altered to also include fighter-bomber sorties as the airfield became heavily involved through the vital D-Day period and beyond.

Ford kept busy during peacetime as the Fleet Air Arm returned in the summer of 1945 to enable first-line squadrons to form and work up to full readiness. Another major event occurred in August 1951 when No 800 Squadron formed at HMS Peregrine with Supermarine Attackers to become the first naval jet fighter unit. Eventually Ford was closed in November 1958 but this did not signal the end of flying as civil aircraft continued to employ the airfield until all flying finally ceased in 1980.

The nearby CWGC Climping (St. Mary) Churchyard contains 18 casualties of the Second World War as well as peacetime burials.

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CWGC Climping (St. Mary) Churchyard - Climping, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Gerald Bruce Johnson was born in Auckland, New Zealand on the 4th September 1919 and worked in a clothing business. He volunteered as an Air Gunner in September 1939 and started training at Weraroa on 18th December 1939.

In mid-January 1940 he went to the Air Observers' School, Ohakea for a gunnery course and air experience. Johnson sailed for the UK on the 23rd March in the SS 'Akaroa'. He was posted to 5OTU at Aston Down on 29th May to convert to Bristol Blenheims and was awarded his air gunner's badge and Sergeant's stripes on the 5th July 1940 and joined 23 Squadron at Collyweston the next day.

From late December 1940 the squadron, flying from Ford, was carrying out night-intruder sorties over enemy-occupied France, still in Blenheims. They started receiving Douglas Havocs in March 1941.

Johnson was killed on THE 28th May 1941 when his Douglas Havoc, BB893, spun in during a low-level practice dogfight near RAF Manston. The pilot, F/O Derek Alan Willans, another Battle of Britain veteran, was also killed along with Sgt. Lloyd Jones.
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CWGC Climping (St. Mary) Churchyard - Climping, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Derek Alan Willans was born on the 5th August 1920 in Rugby and educated at St. Pauls School.

He was awarded Aero Certificate 15250 at Norfolk & Norwich Aero Club on the 23rd August 1937, his occupation recorded as 'Student'.

He joined the RAF on a short service commission in June 1938 and was posted to 12 Group Pool, Aston Down for further training on the 28th January 1940 and after converting to Bristol Blenheims, joined 23 Squadron at RAF Wittering on the 6th April 1940.

He served with this squadron throughout the Battle of Britain.

He was awarded the DFC (gazetted 18th February 1941), the citation stating that one night in January 1941 he displayed great courage in attacking an enemy aircraft over the aerodrome at Poix, continuing his attack down to 500 feet, although aware of the heavy anti-aircraft defences.

Willans was killed on the 28th May 1941, as a Flying Officer with 23 Squadron. He was flying Douglas Havoc BB893 when it spun in during a low-level practice dogfight near RAF Manston.
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CWGC Climping (St. Mary) Churchyard - Climping, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 18th August 1940, at the height of the Battle of Britain, RNAS Ford came under attack from a formation of German Ju-87 Stuka dive bombers. The air raid resulted in 28 killed and many more injured as well as the devastation caused to the airfield buildings and runways. The final resting place of several of those killed can be seen in Clymping Church yard.
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CWGC Climping (St. Mary) Churchyard - Climping, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Climping (St. Mary) Churchyard - Climping, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Climping (St. Mary) Churchyard - Climping, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Climping (St. Mary) Churchyard - Climping, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Climping (St. Mary) Churchyard - Climping, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

There are 16 Commonwealth burials of the First World War at CWGC Littlehampton Cemetery with a further 55 of the Second, 3 being unidentified. There are 13 German war burials here 1 being an unidentified airman.

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CWGC Littlehampton Cemetery - Littlehampton, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Karl Bachauer was killed on the 19th August 1940 when his Junkers Ju 88A-1 Werk 7069 "9K + FR" was shot down by Supermarine Spitfires of No. 602 Sq. while on a sortie to Little Rissington.
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CWGC Littlehampton Cemetery - Littlehampton, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 19th August 1942, Junkers Ju 88 A-4 142136 (M2+FL) was shot down by a Bristol Beaufighter of 141 Squadron and ditched into the sea southeast of Selsey Bill, West Sussex.

Bf Gefr Heinz zur Nieden and two of his crew members died in the ditching, with one saved from from the water.
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CWGC Littlehampton Cemetery - Littlehampton, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 16th December 1942, Dornier Do217E-4 (F8+FM) of 4 Staffel Kampfgeschwader crashed into a gasometer at Bognor Regis Gas Works whilst trying to evade a fighter. Flugzeugführer Unteroffizier Erich Dittrich, the Bordfunker Obergefreiter Johannes Gester and the Beomechaniker Obergefreiter Gustav Dehnke and Obergefreiter Erich Ignaz Berger were all killed.
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CWGC Littlehampton Cemetery - Littlehampton, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Littlehampton Cemetery - Littlehampton, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 24th October 1942, the crew of Avro Lancaster I W4306 took off from RAF Scampton for a raid on Milan.

The aircraft was damaged during the high-risk daylight operation to northern Italy and while attempting to land at Ford airfield, the aircraft crashed, killing five of the crew.

Pilot Dorian Dick Bonnett DFC was one of those who lost his life.
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CWGC Littlehampton Cemetery - Littlehampton, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Handley Page Hampden I AE353 crashed into the English Channel on the 11th December 1941 after attacking Brest. It is likely that the aircraft was damaged by flak over the target.

Observer Archibald Locksley Smiley and his crew were all killed.
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CWGC Littlehampton Cemetery - Littlehampton, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Vickers Wellington II Z8397 crashed on the 11th October 1941 when, after attempting to return back to RAF Binbrook following a raid on Cologne, it landed on a beach near Caister-on-Sea, Norfolk.

Navigator Raymond Henry Todman, from Littlehampton, and his crew were all killed.
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CWGC Littlehampton Cemetery - Littlehampton, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Littlehampton Cemetery - Littlehampton, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot James William Bristowe Phillips DFM was killed on the 25th March 1942 when his HawkerHurricane IIB, Z3350 of the FIU spun into the ground a mile west of Ford Aerodrome.
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CWGC Littlehampton Cemetery - Littlehampton, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 3rd April 1943, the crew of Handley Page Hampden I L4084 were taking part in a fighter affiliation exercise with two Hawker Typhoons when control was lost while taking evasive action. The Hampden spun and dived into the ground from 2,000 feet, killing all on board.
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CWGC Littlehampton Cemetery - Littlehampton, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 24th April 1943, Pilot Ian Maxwell Theodore De Kaap Bocock and Pilot Robert Brown took off from RAF Castle Camps for a night patrol. For unknown reasons, their de Havilland Mosquito NF DZ723 crashed at Housedean Farm near Lewes, Sussex.
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CWGC Littlehampton Cemetery - Littlehampton, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Radio Observer James Harry Kellett lost his life on the 17th December 1942 when his Bristol Beaufighter I, X7878 crashed in a forced landing near Arundel.
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CWGC Littlehampton Cemetery - Littlehampton, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Littlehampton Cemetery - Littlehampton, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

There are 60 burials of the First and Second World Wars at CWGC Worthing (Durrington) Cemetery. Most of these are scattered across the site, but a small number make up a war grave plot near disabled ex-servicemen.

The Queen Alexandra Home for disabled ex-service personnel, established in London in 1919, moved to a house in Boundary Road, Worthing, in 1934. It took the name Gifford House—the name of the original establishment in Roehampton. The Duchess of York (later the Queen Mother) performed the opening ceremony in May 1934.

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CWGC Worthing (Durrington) Cemetery - Worthing, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Worthing (Durrington) Cemetery - Worthing, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Worthing (Durrington) Cemetery - Worthing, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Worthing (Durrington) Cemetery - Worthing, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 20th March 1944, the crew on board Avro Anson I EG686 were undertaking a night navigation exercise, the planned route being Cark, Dumfries, Isle of Man, Blackpool, and returning to Cark. Because of a navigation error the aircraft overshot Cark but realising the error the pilot turned back and attempted to return to Cark. At 04.30hrs the aircraft flew into Swirl How, to the north of Coniston and sadly the pilot and two other airmen in the aircraft were killed.

The following day and inspite of bad weather, a search from the air was conducted and led by CO W/C Jim Gibb AFC in a Magister, he located the wreckage and directed Millom MRU to site. When the aircraft was being recovered it is recorded in Michael Hurst's book on Lakeland air accidents that an (unknown) Spitfire was found nearby, this aircraft was reported missing sometime previously and it's pilot had also been killed. This Spitfire was recovered and was eventually repaired to fly again.

Wireless Operator Walter William Younger lost his life on the Anson.
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CWGC Worthing (Durrington) Cemetery - Worthing, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 29th May 1943, Pilot Peter Samuel George died from injuries sustained when his Airspeed Oxford I, V4053, crashed on an overshoot near Kelmscott
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CWGC Worthing (Durrington) Cemetery - Worthing, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 22nd December 1941, the crew of Bristol Blenheim N6166 were undertaking a searchlight homing exercise and having took off from RAF Church Fenton the aircraft flew towards RAF Linton on Ouse where the homing exercise was to be carried out.

At 23.45hrs the aircraft was flying in a fast and very shallow dive when it struck the top of a tree and then first touched the ground thirty yards after the tree and went through a hedge. It then bounced a hundred yards and then broke in two behind the turret. The rear of the aircraft was left behind as the rest of the aircraft continued to somersault and break over with one of the engines being found 250 yards further on.

The pilot, Leonard Henry Tickner died of his injuries in York Military Hospital at 08.05hrs the following morning but the Wireless Operator survived, albeit seriously injured.

There was no indication that a forced landing was being made so it was assumed that the crew were trying to locate the homing searchlight at the time of the crash and simply flew into the ground. The accident occurred on land near Naffits Farm, between Wigginton and Sutton on the Forest.
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CWGC Worthing (Durrington) Cemetery - Worthing, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator Laurence Dacre Stratford was killed whilst flying as a Westland Wallace, K4340 of No 7 Bombing and Gunnery School when it dived into the ground at Margam ranges in Glamorganshire after it had stalled on the 11th February 1940.
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CWGC Worthing (Durrington) Cemetery - Worthing, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Observer Edwin Lloyd Strudwick of RAF Costal Command was flying in Bristol Blenheim Z5765 when it crashed onto Thorney Island on the 11th February 1941.
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CWGC Worthing (Durrington) Cemetery - Worthing, West Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Within days of the British declaration of war on Germany on the 4th August 1914, two infantry Divisions and a cavalry Brigade of the Indian Army were ordered to mobilise and prepare for overseas service. Units of the Indian Expeditionary Force began arriving in France in September, and by late October they were involved in heavy fighting on the Messines Ridge in Belgium.

At the same time, here in the UK, hospital capacity was being greatly expanded as the armed forces swelled with volunteers, contingents from the Empire arrived, and thousands of men went into action on the Western Front. In Brighton, existing hospitals like the Royal Sussex County Hospital and the specialist eye hospital dedicated beds for servicemen, but most accommodation would be in requisitioned and adapted buildings. The army’s 2nd Eastern General Hospital occupied several premises including a boys’ grammar school. A workhouse infirmary in Elm Grove became the Kitchener Indian General Hospital, and the Royal Pavilion, the Corn Exchange, and the Dome were converted into facilities with wards, treatment rooms and operating theatres.

In October 1914, Brighton became the centre of Indian army medical care in the United Kingdom. Kitchener Indian General Hospital and the converted Royal Pavilion, etc. were all set up to accommodate the religious and caste sensitivities of the Hindu, Muslim and Sikh soldiers, from nine different kitchens to separate places for worship. Over 4,300 Indian patients were admitted to the facilities on the Pavilion estate alone between the 1st December 1914 and the 15th February 1916. Most recovered to return to their units; those who died were buried or cremated in accordance with their faith. A site on the downs above the city and the sea was chosen for cremations, and 53 Hindu and Sikh servicemen were committed to fire there in accordance with their faiths.

Most of those cremated on Patcham Down were officially commemorated by the CWGC at Neuve-Chapelle Memorial in France, where some 4,700 servicemen of the Indian Army who died on the Western Front and have no known grave are named. Fourteen were named on CWGC’s Hollybrook Memorial in Southampton, although that memorial is primarily for soldiers who died at sea.

In 2009, the CWGC decided that while it was true that these men did not have graves, they were not ‘missing’ in the conventional sense, or lost at sea, and it would be more appropriate to commemorate them where they had been cremated. A new memorial was designed and built upon Patcham Down by the CWGC. This new home for the names of those 53 men who died in Brighton and were brought up here to this beautiful and peaceful spot to pass through fire was unveiled in 2010. It stands near the Chattri Memorial, a privately funded memorial unveiled in 1921, remembering all Indian soldiers who fell in the Great War.

The memorial is only accessible by foot, so it was a long but very scenic trek across the South Downs to the location.

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CWGC Patcham Down Indian Forces Cremation Memorial - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Patcham Down Indian Forces Cremation Memorial - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Patcham Down Indian Forces Cremation Memorial - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Patcham Down Indian Forces Cremation Memorial - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Patcham Down Indian Forces Cremation Memorial - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Patcham Down Indian Forces Cremation Memorial - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Patcham Down Indian Forces Cremation Memorial - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

I'll upload the other locations from the trip in the next few days.

User avatar
SuffolkBlue
Posts: 1390
Joined: Sun 31 Aug 2008, 7:31 pm
Location: Bury St. Edmunds

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 28/04/2021**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

Hove Cemetery is split into new and old sections. The old cemetery lies on the south side of Old Shoreham Road, while the new cemetery is situated on the northern side of the road.

CWGC Hove Old Cemetery was first used in 1882 and contains 86 war graves of the First World War, the majority of which are in a war grave plot.

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CWGC Hove Old Cemetery - Hove, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hove Old Cemetery - Hove, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hove Old Cemetery - Hove, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Gunner Herbert Howard Gandy was both in Hove in 1890 and joined the Navy in February 1906.

He was serving in HMA Philomel in Australia on the outbreak of the first world war, afterwards he was in HMS Empress of India and HMS Suva which were engaged in patrolling the Red Sea.

He was promoted to Gunner in November 1916 and appointed for gunnery duties to HM Torpedo boat no.7. He came ashore at Sheerness for recreation and was killed during an Gotha air raid on the docks on the 5th June 1917.
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CWGC Hove Old Cemetery - Hove, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hove Old Cemetery - Hove, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 6th June 1918, Bristol Fighter B1304 of 1 (Observers) School of Aerial Gunnery was involved in a mid air collision with another Bristol Fighter B8922, over New Romney, Kent.

Lt Stephen James Chapman (26) & Flt Cadet Tom Mathie (19) were both killed.
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CWGC Hove Old Cemetery - Hove, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hove Old Cemetery - Hove, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hove Old Cemetery - Hove, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

During the early months of the Second World War, a piece of land in Block 1 on the eastern boundary of the new cemetery was set aside by the Borough Council for service war burials. CWGC Hove New Cemetery contains 37 war graves with the remainder being scattered elsewhere.

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CWGC Hove New Cemetery - Hove, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On a 8th February 1944, Air Bomber Reginald Gordon Graves was on board Vickers Wellington X LN185 for a night exercise involving cooperation with Mosquito XIII HK374.

Tragically, the Mosquito crew misjudged their closing speed and smashed into the tail plane of the Wellington which fell away, out of control, to crash at Priors Leas, Southbourne, Sussex

Reginald and six airmen were all killed.
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CWGC Hove New Cemetery - Hove, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 16th December 1943, Air Bomber Norman Nowell Griffin boarded his Avro Lancaster III JB639 at RAF Kirmington for a raid on the 'Big City', Berlin.

On their return they found much of the area shrouded in fog and crashed at Grange Farm, Barton-on-Humber, the Lancaster just missing the farmhouse and clipping a hayrick before hitting the ground.

All of the crew were killed.
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CWGC Hove New Cemetery - Hove, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 24th April 1941, Pilot Francis Norman Alstrom was on board Vickers Wellington IA N2912 conducting night circuit training at RAF Bassingbourn.

At 00:50hrs, his aircraft was shot down by enemy intruder aircraft, Dornier Do17, flown by Feldwebel Vinzenz Giessübel of 2./NJG 2 over the airfield. The Wellington crashed into Wellington R1404 which was parked on a dispersal, destroying both aircraft.
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CWGC Hove New Cemetery - Hove, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hove New Cemetery - Hove, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Richard Burls Barr was killed when his Avro Anson I, R3455 crashed near Diss in Norfolk after it stalled at low level in fog on the 19th November 1940.
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CWGC Hove New Cemetery - Hove, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 7th July 1943, Wireless Operator Alfred Charles Horley was on a training mission from RAF Wing in Vickers Wellington III X3955 when it swung off course immediately after takeoff. The starboard wing stalled as a result of the unusual angle of attack- went out of control and crashed.

Two crew members also lost their lives in the crash.
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CWGC Hove New Cemetery - Hove, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Robert Peter Belsey lost his life on the 27th August 1943 while flying Bristol Beaufighter I, X7545, which crashed in an attempted forced landing at Perry Farm near Sherington in Buckinghamshire.
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CWGC Hove New Cemetery - Hove, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery contains 275 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and a further 102 of the Second commemorated on the site. There are also 40 Foreign National war burials here and 4 non-war service burials.

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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator Jack Everett was on board Vickers Wellington X LN509 during an air test from RAF Market Harborough when it collided with another Wellington, LP627, near the airfield, on the 13th July 1944, with all on board both aircraft lost.
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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator Donald Brill Simms of Woodingdean, Brighton, lost his life on the 25th September 1940 when his Bristol Blenheim IV P6905 crashed close to Swaffham while on a anti-shipping patrol from RAF West Raynham.
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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

George Gristock was born in Pretoria, South Africa but emigrated to the UK before WWII. He was 35 years old, and a Warrant Officer Class II holding the appointment of company sergeant major in 2nd Battalion, Royal Norfolk Regiment, British Army during the Second World War. During the Battle of Belgium the 2nd Battalion was part of the British Expeditionary Force.

On the 21st May 1940 near the River Escaut, Belgium, south of Tournai, he organised a party of eight riflemen and went forward to cover the company's right flank, where the enemy had broken through. He then went on with one man under heavy fire and was severely wounded in both legs, but having gained his fire position undetected, he managed to put out of action a machine-gun which was inflicting heavy casualties and killed the crew of four.

He then dragged himself back to the right flank position but refused to be evacuated until contact with the battalion had been established. He later died of his wounds.

Victoria Cross citation
The announcement and accompanying citation for the decoration was published in supplement to the London Gazette on 23 August 1940.

War Office, 23rd August, 1940.

The KING has been pleased to approve of the award of the Victoria Cross to the undermentioned : —

No. 391398 Warrant Officer Class II (Company Sergeant-Major) George Gristock, The Royal Norfolk Regiment.
For most conspicuous gallantry on the 21st May 1940, when his company was holding a position on the line of the River Escaut, south of Tournai. After a prolonged attack, the enemy succeeded in breaking through beyond the company's right flank which was consequently threatened. Company Sergeant-Major Gristock having organised a party of eight riflemen from company headquarters, went forward to cover the right flank.

Realising that an enemy machine-gun had moved forward to a position from which it was inflicting heavy casualties on his company, Company Sergeant-Major Gristock went on, with one man as connecting file, to try to put it out of action. Whilst advancing, he came under heavy machine-gun fire from the opposite bank and was severely wounded in both legs, his right knee being badly smashed. He nevertheless gained his fireposition, some twenty yards from the enemy machine-gun post, undetected, and by well aimed rapid fire killed the machine-gun crew of four and put their gun out of action. He then dragged himself back to the right flank position from which he refused to be evacuated until contact with the battalion on the right had been established and the line once more made good.

By his gallant action, the position of the company was secured, and many casualties prevented. Company Sergeant-Major Gristock has since died of his wounds.

Gristock's Victoria Cross is in the collection of the Royal Norfolk Regimental Museum in Norwich Castle, England.
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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

This was the front page of the Evening Argus, 8 May 1942.

The spectacular end of a raider over Brighton

‘Strewn across the Downs at the back of a South Coast town are bits and pieces of a German bomber. In the early hours of this morning, the droning of heavy engines of the raider awakened the residents. Suddenly there came the sound of cannon fire – a night fighter had caught up with the intruder. The raider was seen to burst into flames. As it lost height it broke into pieces, followed by a terrific explosion. When I visited the scene this morning, writes an Evening Argus reporter, I saw the huge tail which had obviously been shot away by cannon fire. In a ploughed field I saw one of the engines. On a hill, a mile and a quarter away, pieces were being picked up. The crew of the machine, numbering five, were all killed. When the main debris of the plane, which was buried in a crater, was examined in daylight, the mangled bodies of four of the airmen, burned and charred beyond recognition, were recovered. One of the uniforms was decorated with the Iron Cross first class and another with the Iron Cross second class … ‘

Luftwaffe Leutnant R. Oepen and his crew pay the ultimate price, having been tracked and traced by ‘Johnny’ Topham and ‘Wilbur’ Berridge in their Beaufighter of No. 219 Squadron.
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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

At 02.59hrs on the 8th May 1942, a Heinkel HE 111 from Kampfgeschwader 100 - 1 Staffel pathfinder unit was shot down by a Bristol Beaufighter from 219 Squadron, RAF Tangmere, crewed by Squadron Leader J. G. Topham and Flying Officer H. W. Berridge.

The Heinkel hit power cables some 600 yards east of the A23 trunk road, and crashed at Ewebottom, Patcham, north of Brighton. All five German crew were killed: two were wearing the Iron Cross. They were buried with full military honours here at Bear Road Cemetery.
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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 29th March 1943, Brighton, Hove and Eastbourne were attacked in a 'Hit and Run' raid carried out by eight FW190s of 10/Jagdgeschwader (Fighter Group)/54. On 29 March they attacked Brighton, Hove, and Eastbourne. Four of these aircraft attacked Brighton.

One German plane was brought down over the Channel and the pilot's body was washed ashore a month later. He was Unteroffizier Joachim Koch, aged 21.
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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 19th August 1942, Junkers Ju 88 A-4 142136 (M2+FL) was shot down by Bristol Beaufighter of 141 Squadron and ditched in sea southeast of Selsey Bill. All on board were killed.

Bf Gefr Heinz zur Nieden, F Uffz Friedel Nottmeier and Bs Gefr Waölter Bleiber all lost their lives while B Gefr Heidsizk verletzt was taken prisoner.
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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

At 12.25hrs on the 25th May 1943, Brighton was attacked by 25 to 30 German Focke-Wulf 190's. Twenty-two 500 kg bombs were dropped and the streets were machine-gunned during the five-minute raid. Fatalities included ten men, twelve women and two children. An additional 58 people were seriously injured and a further 69 people were slightly injured. One of the central piers in the 20-metre-high London Road railway viaduct was demolished. There was severe damage to railway workshops and rolling stock. This was the worst raid for damage inflicted on the town during the war with 150 houses made uninhabitable, more than 500 people made homeless, and the Black Rock Gasworks being set on fire.

Constable Frank Parker was on of those to lose their life in the raid.
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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 16th August 1943, St. Cuthman's Church, which had been built in Lintott Avenue, Brighton, in 1937, was destroyed by a German bomb. Warden William Hayler was killed when the buildings roof collapsed.
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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Air Gunner Dennis Edwin Faulkner was killed on the 2nd June 1943 during a cross-country exercise in Vickers Wellington IC
R1707 from RAF Lossiemouth. Eyewitnesses reports tell of the bomber exploding in the air, possibly as a result of lightning.
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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Blind Veterans UK was founded by Sir Arthur Pearson as the Blinded Soldiers' and Sailors' Care Committee. They provided training, rehabilitation and lifelong support to those blinded in the First World War. In 1927, the training and rehabilitation activities transferred from Regent's Park in London to the West House Centre in Brighton.

In 1938 a new, groundbreaking purpose-built centre at Ovingdean, Brighton was completed. This provides training and rehabilitation activities, convalescent care and holiday breaks for blind veterans. The centre continues its work to this day.
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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Brighton (Bear Road) Cemetery - Brighton, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

CWGC Lewes Cemetery contans 48 castulies from both world wars. Most of these are scattered across the site, but a small number make up a war grave plot.

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CWGC Lewes Cemetery - Lewes, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

WAAF Ena May Jenner was serving at RAF St Athan when she died from complications following an operation on the 14th June 1942.
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CWGC Lewes Cemetery - Lewes, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Lewes Cemetery - Lewes, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

A short drive down the road is CWGC Newhaven Cemetery.

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CWGC Newhaven Cemetery - Newhaven, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 12th October 1944, Air Gunner Ronald Arthur Ellis was on board Vickers Wellington X JA475 on a training mission from RAF Market Harborough encountered violent electrical storm and crashed near Guilsborough, killing all on board.
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CWGC Newhaven Cemetery - Newhaven, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

HMS Loyalty was a turbine-powered Algerine-class minesweeper of the Royal Navy, formerly HMS Rattler.

In April 1944 she underwent a refit at Portsmouth, after which she was assigned to Force G to give minesweeping support to the Allied landings in Normandy. Loyalty spent May carrying out exercises and rehearsals, and also escorted sister ship Stormcloud into Portsmouth after she had been damaged by a mine.

Loyalty then took part in the assault operations of the 6th June 1944, clearing Channel 6, and then remaining deployed off Gold Beach to cover operations. She remained off Normandy after the landings and throughout July, carrying out sweeps of the anchorages.

She was still off Normandy on the 22nd August 1944 and was returning to Portsmouth with the minesweepers Ready, Hound, Hydra and Rattlesnake when the sweep wires parted. Loyalty and the minesweeping trawler Doon were dispatched to recover the sweep. As they were doing this Loyalty was attacked and sunk by the German U-boat U-480. She capsized in less than seven minutes, with the loss of her captain and 18 ratings. There were 30 survivors. Loyalty was replaced in the flotilla by sister ship Tanganyika. The wrecksite is designated as a protected place under the Protection of Military Remains Act 1986.
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CWGC Newhaven Cemetery - Newhaven, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Air Gunner Emerson Earl Case grew up in Woodstock, Ontario, Canada.

During the second world war, he was assigned to 431 (Iroquois) Squadron, RCAF, based at RAF Tholthorpe.

On the 18th November 1943, he took off in Handley Page Halifax V LK640 for a raid on Mannheim. 395 aircraft took part in the raid with 23 losses (5.8%). This was one of the larger diversionary raids and accounts for the high losses. By comparison, the main raid (nn Berlin) registered 2.0% losses. There was cloud cover over the target and bombing was scattered as a result. Most of the damage fell to the north of the town, where the Daimler Benz car plant suffered a 90% loss in production as a result. 21 deaths on the ground and 7500 people were bombed out.

LK640 crashed into the sea, for unknown reasons, with all on board killed.
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CWGC Newhaven Cemetery - Newhaven, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Newhaven Cemetery - Newhaven, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

At CWGC Eastbourne (Langney) Cemetery, there are 4 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and 36 from the Second, 3 being unidentified seamen of the Merchant Navy. There are also 2 Polish war burials here.

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CWGC Eastbourne (Langney) Cemetery - Eastbourne, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Plutonowy Marian Szmidt was killed whilst flying in North American Mustang III, HB821 of No 316 Sqn, when it hit a crane at Friston after swinging on take-off on the 13th August 1944.
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CWGC Eastbourne (Langney) Cemetery - Eastbourne, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Eastbourne (Langney) Cemetery - Eastbourne, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Along with his crew, Wireless Operator Leon Hampel boarded Vickers Wellington IC R1443 at RAF Syerston on the 6th May 1941 for a raid on Le Havre.

His aircraft was thought to have been shot down off Texel, at least one hour's flying time from the intended route. Hampel's body was washed up on the south coast of England and another was found months later on the Dutch coast.
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CWGC Eastbourne (Langney) Cemetery - Eastbourne, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

SS Stanwold was a steamship built in 1909 by the Stanhope Steamship Co. On the 22nd February 1942, she was in a convoy carrying a cargo of coal from Southend to Cowes. At 11.30hrs she reported steering problems due to a heavy list to port. At 04.20hrs the following day, she was reported as being sighted with a list to starboard. No further communication was received. Some bodies were washed ashore some days later. The Captain and crew of 19 and 2 gunners were lost.
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CWGC Eastbourne (Langney) Cemetery - Eastbourne, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 20th March 1940, the 5,500 ton steamer, SS Barnhill was making its way from Halifax to London with a variety of goods including tinned food.

The Barnhill was some six miles off Langney Point, near Beachy Head, when the Skipper, Michael O’Neil ,heard the look-out yell “aircraft overhead!” Initially it was thought to be an RAF plane, but as it circled overhead things began to look ominous as the circling turned into a dive towards the Barnhill. A bomb dropped which narrowly missed its target. The plane came out of the first dive and descended into another. This time the Luftwaffe was more successful as several bombs found their mark, including one straight down the funnel and another into one of the holds which held timber and carbide, inducing a fire. The Skipper was knocked out and four crew members were killed;


Chief Steward Charles Adams

Chief Officer Thomas Rothwell

Third Officer George Stewart

Ordinary Seaman Ronald Housman, aged only eighteen

​The survivors assumed Captain O’Neil also perished as he was nowhere to be seen.

The alert had reached the Eastbourne lifeboat station and the lifeboat Jane Holland set off. Fortunately a nearby Dutch Merchant vessel responded quickly and was able to rescue eighteen of the crew from the stricken Barnhill. The Jane Holland relieved the Dutch ship of the survivors and proceeded to the Barnhill to pick up a further ten survivors, but not Michael O’Neil.

A tug went out to the Barnhill and it was reported by locals on the shore that the Barnhill’s bell was ringing. So out went the Jane Holland again accompanied by a Police Surgeon. The tug couldn’t get near enough to the Barnhill but reported an injured man on the forecastle.​

Despite being seriously injured, Michael O’Neil managed to roll across the deck and by gripping the bell rope in his teeth and ring it. In perilous conditions as roaring flames and showers of sparks were flying, two of the Jane Holland’s crew, Thomas Allchorn and Alec Huggett transferred to the tug and leapt aboard the Barnhill and located the Skipper. The Jane Holland was brought along side with the Police Surgeon yelling instructions to the two gallant volunteers. He was eventually brought on to the Jane Holland to receive treatment before being removed to the Princess Alice Hospital in Eastbourne where he begun a long recovery. Michael O’Neil was most praiseworthy of the two lifeboat men. He stated, “They were taking their in their hands doing it, but there is no doubt that I owe my life to those grand fellows.” He spent several months in hospital.​

Sadly another crew member, Second Engineer Douglas Bertram succumbed to his wounds and died the following day. He is buried in Ladywell Cemetery in Brockley.

There has been great conjecture to the identity of the German Bomber; most sources believe it than likely a HE111 of Korpsfuhrungskette Fl.Korps X.

Despite a thirteen hour battle to put out the flames on the Barnhill, it was finally realised she was a lost cause and she broke and sank. At low tide parts of her can still be seen.

One bonus for the local population was that hundreds of tins of food were washed up on to the beach, minus their labels as people clambered to find what they could to supplement the war time rationing. Other valuable goods were also salvaged over the coming weeks.
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CWGC Eastbourne (Langney) Cemetery - Eastbourne, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The final location of the day was CWGC Hastings Cemtery, which contains 257 casualties from both world wars. These are located in two separate plots, along with civilians killed in air raids across the town.

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CWGC Hastings Cemetery - Hastings, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 24th November 1944, Air Bomber John Herbert Povey was on board Vickers Wellington X NA783 during a night navigation exercise from RAF Chipping Warden when a wing tip hit the ground and the Wellington crashed at Litchborough, near Northampton, killing all on board.
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CWGC Hastings Cemetery - Hastings, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Private William Richman of the Devonshire Regiment was a beach mine victim at Fairlight on the 12th September 1940. It may be that Richman's accident revealed the presence of the minefield to the Germans as the documents indicate that the very next day, six HE bombs were dropped in the same area, blowing up a large number of mines.
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CWGC Hastings Cemetery - Hastings, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 27th January 1941, the war diary of 70 Royal Sussex Regt. state: "Pte Murphy died as a result of gun wound. Accidental."
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CWGC Hastings Cemetery - Hastings, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hastings Cemetery - Hastings, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Winifred Lewis, aged 30, and her daughter Norah Maud Lewis were killed when several Focke Wulf 190s and Messerschmitt Bf 109s strafed with machine gun fire and dropped 25 HE Bombs across Hastings on the 11th March 1943.

It was one of the worse attacks on the town during the war, 37 other people died and 90 more were injured, 39 seriously.
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CWGC Hastings Cemetery - Hastings, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Clifford Glazier, aged 14, was killed when a single bomber dropped one HE bomb that hit the Plaza Cinema on Robertson Street, Hastings, on the 30th September 1940. Thirteen other people were killed and thirty five injured, twelve seriously.
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CWGC Hastings Cemetery - Hastings, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Nelson Kemp, aged 33, was killed when multiple German bombers dropped 40 high explosive bombs on Hastings on the 26th September 1940. Two other people were killed in the raid and a number of others wounded.

Nelson, the son of William and Florence Gertrude Elizabeth Kemp, was a Special Constable and lived at 128 Emmanuel Road, Hastings. His brother Norman Kemp was killed in another air raid on Hastings four days later, after travelling down to the town to arrange his brothers funeral.
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CWGC Hastings Cemetery - Hastings, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hastings Cemetery - Hastings, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 12th March 1944, George Saunders, his wife Ethel Mary Saunders and their son Bryon John Saunders were all killed when a single HE bomb hit 22 and 24 Priory Road, Hastings. Four others were killed in the incident with three others injured.
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CWGC Hastings Cemetery - Hastings, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

At 13:00hrs on the 23rd May 1943, the Swan Hotel was one of five public houses and two hotels hit by the bombs. The hotel was packed with people having lunch when the bomb hit and caused several deaths and injuries. Among the dead were the hotel owners’ wife Grace Gummerson, their three year old son Trevor, and her sister Hilda.

The search through the debris afterwards, lasting all night and the following day led to the rescue of one man and one dog.

The Swan Hotel had been part of Hastings Old Town since 1523, originally a posting house and later an Inn it was a well known and popular focal point for the community. The site is now a memorial garden dedicated to those lost to the bombing.
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CWGC Hastings Cemetery - Hastings, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Josef Butz was part of a crew flying a Dornier 17z-3 which was shot down over the sea near Eastbourne, on the 22nd December 1940. He was washed ashore on Hastings beach. Paul Krings body was also washed ashore a month later.
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CWGC Hastings Cemetery - Hastings, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hastings Cemetery - Hastings, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Eberhard Weyergang and Gustav Nelson were killed when their Messerschmitt Me-110 was shot down on the 25th September 1940 and crashed near Beaulieu Farm, Hastings
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CWGC Hastings Cemetery - Hastings, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Friedrich Ziel was killed on the 27th September 1940, when his Junkers Ju 88A-1 Werk 4117 "3Z +DN" was shot down by enemy fighters during a sortie to London and crashed off the coast at Hastings. I suspect the 22nd October was the date his body washed up on shore.
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CWGC Hastings Cemetery - Hastings, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hastings Cemetery - Hastings, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hastings Cemetery - Hastings, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

HMS Ariadne was a Diadem-class protected cruiser of the Royal Navy, which was launched in 1898, In March 1913, she was converted to a stokers' training ship and in 1917 was converted to a minelayer and assigned to the Nore Command. She was torpedoed and sunk off Beachy Head by the German submarine UC-65 (Otto Steinbrinck) on 26th July 1917.
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CWGC Hastings Cemetery - Hastings, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hastings Cemetery - Hastings, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hastings Cemetery - Hastings, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hastings Cemetery - Hastings, East Sussex, Sunday 18th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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SuffolkBlue
Posts: 1390
Joined: Sun 31 Aug 2008, 7:31 pm
Location: Bury St. Edmunds

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 29/04/2021**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

Another south coast trip, this time a little further along the coastline from Portland to the New Forest.

On the way there, the first port of call was CWGC Over Wallop (St. Peter) Churchyard, a couple of miles from AAC Middle Wallop.

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CWGC Over Wallop (St. Peter) Churchyard - Over Wallop, Hampshire, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Miroslaw Ignacy Wojciechowski was born on 6th March 1917, in the small village of Zoppot on the shores of the Baltic Sea. He completed his education at Wydzialowa High School at Torun in 1932. Two years later he joined the Polish Air Force, entering the NCO's School at Bydgoszcz and qualifying as a mechanic in 1937.

He was then accepted for flying training in the training squadron of the 4th Air Regiment at Torun and graduated from the Deblin fighter school in 1938. The family home was in Torun, so Mirek was able to say his goodbyes as war broke out. Kaporal Wojciechowski flew with 142 Eskadra in combat until it was ordered to disperse at the end of September 1939.

He entered Romania on the 27th September 1939. He kicked his heels for a few months, before being transferred to England in February 1940 as a member of the RAF Volunteer Reserve, ending up in Blackpool with many other Polish airmen.

As the Polish squadrons were being raised, he was checked out on various aircraft; his Pilot's Flying Log Book shows that between the 23rd July 1940 and 11th August 1940, he rotated through the Tiger Moth, the Hawker Hector, the Fairey Battle and finally, the Hurricane.

He was discharged from the RAF Volunteer Reserve, rejoined the Polish Air Force on the 6th August 1940 and he was assigned to 303 Squadron.

Throughout August 1940, 303 was designated as an airfield defence squadron. On the 30th August, Mirek was flying as wingman to Ludwik Paskiewicz on a training exercise led by Sqn Leader Kellet, intercepting six Blenheim bombers. Claiming he was unable to raise Kellet, Paskiewicz peeled off with the rest of the flight, in pursuit of German aircraft.

Paskiewicz was credited with a Dornier Do 17, officially reprimanded and told that he and the squadron was now fully operational and he flown throughout the Battle of Britian.

On the 2nd July 1941 during a routine "Circus" over Lille, he "forgot to check his mirror". He never saw the new Me109F's that "bounced" him. Machine gun bullets and cannon shells ripped through his aircraft. One cannon shell came through the armour behind his cockpit seat, through his shoulder blade and on into the instrument panel. It exploded behind the panel, throwing glass and metal back into his face.

Surprised, shocked and "very angry" with himself, he managed to escape his pursuer and nurse his badly damaged Spitfire back over the channel, landing it without further incident at Martlesham.

According to the squadron Combat Diary "he climbed from a cockpit which was dripping with blood; he collapsed walking to Sick Quarters". He was taken immediately to East Suffolk Hospital in Ipswich where emergency surgery saved his life and his arm.

He spent the next five months recuperating from his wounds, undergoing two further operations to graft skin over the large hole in his shoulder. He returned to active duty with 303 Squadron in December 1941, flying with them until the end of 1942.

Between 1942 and 1945, Mirek moved between 303 and FTS, teaching others to fly. On the 7th November 1942, he was awarded the Virtuti Militari by General Sikorski, commander in chief of all Polish forces. Mirek was moved from the disbanded Polish Air Force to the Polish Resettlement Corps in early 1947 when the British government offered a haven to all Poles in England. The PRC was wound up and, by now a Warrant Officer, he re-engaged as a Master Pilot in the RAF in November 1948.

From 1945 to 1949 there were more postings to flight training and BAT (Blind Approach) schools, where Mirek became one of the most experienced Flight Instructors in the RAF. On the 1st January 1950 he was posted to 2 Squadron in Germany. Initially flying Spitfires, the squadron soon converted to the Gloster Meteors.

Current research undertaken by Wojtek Matusiak on 2 Squadron's photo reconnaissance role in Berlin suggests that the high altitude Spitfires, which at that time were well out of reach of Soviet air defences, were engaged in covert surveillance over East Germany and even Poland.

In 1953 Mirek transferred to 247 Squadron, initially on the Meteors that he had converted to on 2 Squadron, but then converting to the new Hawker Hunters. They shared RAF Odiham with the Javelin fighter bombers. He flew for a further 3 years, before his untimely death on the 22nd October 1956.

There is this extract from MoD records -

On the night of 22nd October 1956 Warrant Officer Miroslaw Wojciechowski was flying as second pilot on Balliol Mk T2 Serial WG184 of 288 Sqn then based at RAF Middle Wallop. The first pilot was S/Ldr Charles Warren MBE DFC. During dual night circuits and landings and shortly after calling downwind for landing on the second circuit, the aircraft collided with a Chipmunk (operated by Air Services Ltd) between 1500 and 1800ft. The captain, S/Ldr Warren, jettisoned the canopy and baled out, injuring himself on landing. Warrant Officer Wojciechowski was sadly killed when he struck the ground with his parachute only partially opened. It is not known whether he baled out or was thrown from the aircraft on impact with the ground. The Chipmunk pilot, Flying Officer Htay Maung (Burmese Air Force) baled out and was injured on landing.

The Court of Inquiry concluded that the accident had been caused by the divergence of regulations governing civil and military flying, in that the Chipmunk was flying just within the airfield traffic zone. Contributory factors were considered to be the restricted visibility caused by the darkness and the large blind spots caused by the canopy structure of the Balliol.
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CWGC Over Wallop (St. Peter) Churchyard - Over Wallop, Hampshire, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 12th July 1954, Percival P.10 Vega Gull G-AFBC crashed near Southampton Airport, Eastleigh, after the engine failed on take off, all 3 on board (pilot and two passengers) were killed.

According to the following extract from the official AAIB accident report:

"The aircraft had landed at Eastleigh Airport to clear customs after a flight from La Baule, France which took 2 hours and 23 minutes. During this flight the engine ran erratically with the throttle set to cruising. At full throttle it ran normally. The pilot attributed the trouble to an ignition defect so on arrival at Eastleigh asked B.O.A.C. mechanics to check the magnetos. Both contact breakers were cleaned and adjusted but before the starboard one was refitted the mechanic (J. Annear) advised the pilot to have it renewed as the points were badly worn. The pilot said this was unnecessary as he was only making a short flight.

The pilot ground tested the engine and appeared to be satisfied but said the engine would not switch off. The mechanic (J. Annear) said he would adjust the make and break cover spring but was not allowed by the pilot to do so; the pilot saying he would stop the engine by turning off the petrol - he was seen to do this. The aircraft then left for Middle Wallop at 17:25 hours.

It made a normal take off and the engine appeared to be running satisfactorily. When a height of about 80 feet had been reached, with the aircraft still within the aerodrome boundary, the engine started misfiring. It continued to climb but soon afterwards, when over the aerodrome boundary, at an estimated height of between 120 feet to 150 feet, a gentle turn to the left was started which brought the aircraft on to a parallel course with the Eastleigh-Southampton Road which borders the aerodrome. The engine continued to misfire and shortly afterwards appeared to cut out.

At the time the aircraft was in a level attitude and had lost about 50 feet in height. Almost immediately after the engine cut out the nose and left wing dropped abruptly and the aircraft dived to the ground. On impact the port wing disintegrated and the starboard wing turned over. On impact the engine broke off and the front portion of the fuselage was telescoped."

In addition, the following newspaper report ("Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer", Tuesday 13 July 1954) names the three on board that were killed:

"THREE DIE IN PRIVATE 'PLANE CRASH
Dive into ground near airfield.
Three people returning home from a Continental holiday were killed when a private Percival aircraft crashed in a cornfield in Eastleigh, near Southampton Airport, last night. They were the owner, Group Captain Mansell Maybury Grece, of RAF Station, Middle Wallop, Hampshire, and Mrs. Grece and her uncle, Mr. H. D. Hannan (59), of Victoria Road, Kensington.

The plane had landed at the airport earlier with engine trouble but took off again after repairs. The aircraft, bound for Middle Wallop airfield, had arrived from France.

'Nose into ground.'
Forty-year-old Group Captain Grece was on leave before getting a new posting. It was as part of this leave he and his wife and her uncle were holidaying on the Continent. Until the end of June he had been Commanding Officer of RAF Station, Middle Wallop.

Mr. Basil Parker of Eastleigh, said: "The plane came down like a stone. It had just missed the telephone wires on an awkward east-to-west landing approach when it suddenly dropped and its nose went into the ground."

The plane belonged to Lady Sherborne until three weeks ago, when it was sold to Group Captain Grece for use in a newly-formed flying club. Group Captain Grece was commissioned in the RAF in 1939 and a year later awarded the DFC. Mrs. Grece was the only daughter of Mr. Clement J. Harman, one of Her Majesty's Lieutenants for the City of London."
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CWGC Over Wallop (St. Peter) Churchyard - Over Wallop, Hampshire, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Laurence Robert Karasek was born in Erith, Kent on 1st October 1916, his surname then spelt 'Karesek'. His father worked in engineering. His paternal grandfather had been born in Bohemia, then part of the Austrian Empire. By 1939 the family were using the spelling 'Karasek'.

Karasek joined the RAF around July 1939 as a direct-entry Airman u/t Observer. He went to 7 B&GS from ITW on the 25th November 1939. He was withdrawn from No. 2 Air Observer Course on the 30th December 1939 after failing his navigation training.

Since direct-entry Airmen u/t Observers received their wireless training before B&GS, Karasek would have remustered as a WOp/AG. He joined 23 Squadron at Collyweston in June 1940, in time for a major Luftwaffe attack on the 18th.

Karasek was still with 23 Squadron in September when the squadron had moved to Middle Wallop. On the 25th September 1940, he was onboard Bristol Blenheim L8639, crewed with pilot P/O E Orgias and gunner AC2 RI Payne. The pilot reported a rough-running engine and his intention to return to Middle Wallop. On the approach, with flaps and undercarriage lowered, the aircraft stalled and crashed at Broughton, south of the airfield. All three crew were killed.

The post-crash report said:

........ From the trail of evidence on the ground - namely a battered cylinder, then a frayed steel cable, and finally the crashed engine with these items missing - we came to the conclusion that for some reason the bolts holding the top cylinder of the radial Mercury engine had become lose. Then the pounding of the piston in the loose cylinder eventually broke the steel cable at the front of the motor allowing the huge top and bottom cowlings to open out suddenly forming an overpowering brake on one side of the aircraft, altogether beyond the control of the pilot. The cowlings of the Mercury were held on by steel cables clamped tightly around at the front and the rear of the motor.
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CWGC Over Wallop (St. Peter) Churchyard - Over Wallop, Hampshire, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Norman Charles Harold Robson was born on 5th February 1914 in Southend and joined the RAFO as a pupil pilot on 17th January 1938.

Shortly afterwards he commenced training at 11 Civil Flying Training School at Perth in Scotland.

He was commissioned in Class ‘A’ of the RAFO on 26th March 1938 and went to 10 FTS Ternhill on the 9th April. After completing the course he joined 72 Squadron at Church Fenton on 29th October 1938.

He relinquished his RAFO commission when he was granted a short service commission in the RAF on the 17th January 1939.

Still serving with 72 Squadron in early July 1940, Robson destroyed a He111 on the 15th August, damaged a Me110 on the 2nd September and shared in the destruction of Do17s on the September 10th and 27th.

He shared in destroying a Me110 on 27th October.

He relinquished his acting rank on the 5th November 1940 and reverted to Flying Officer, pending a posting. This came four days later, when he was posted to CFS Upavon.

Robson stayed in the RAF post-war and was killed in a motor accident at Abbotts Ann, near of Andover, on the 18th January 1954 as a Squadron Leader.
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CWGC Over Wallop (St. Peter) Churchyard - Over Wallop, Hampshire, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr
There are 50 Commonwealth burials of the First World War at CWGC Blandford Cemetery and a further 20 burials of the Second in a separate plot.

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CWGC Blandford Cemetery - Blandford Forum, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Blandford Cemetery - Blandford Forum, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Max Heinitz served in the German Army during the First World War. He died from the flu in Blandford POW Camp on the 4th November 1918.

The Influenza Epidemic reached Blandford POW Camp on the 21st September 1918. By the 26th October, 59 prisoners had died. The figure rose to 78 by the 2nd November. There were 252 cases (198 sent to hospital) in just the one week ending the 26th October. The outbreak at Blandford was so severe that it was discussed in Parliament and reported in The Times.

Spanish flu afflicted some people with a psychosis and delirium that could cause them to commit murder and suicide. A small wood below the Blandford Camp was apparently called 'Suicide Wood' because of the number of RAF personnel who had flu committing suicide there.
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CWGC Blandford Cemetery - Blandford Forum, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 16th February 1943, 377 aircraft carried took part in a raid on Lorient, 24 aircraft were lost- 1.3%. There was little reporting from the authorities, probably because the city's infrastructure was almost completely ruined by previous raids.

The crew of Short Stirling I R9306 were part of this raid. Both starboard engines failed on the return leg to RAF Ridgewell. The order to bale out was given but only 3 were able to do so, the other 4 perished and are buried here.
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CWGC Blandford Cemetery - Blandford Forum, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Blandford Cemetery - Blandford Forum, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Blandford Cemetery - Blandford Forum, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr


Portland Harbour is a manmade harbour attached to the north of Portland. Originally it was a natural anchorage known as Portland Roads, protected by Portland to the south, Chesil Beach to the west and mainland Dorset to the north. Portland Roads was transformed into a naval base following the building of two breakwater arms in the mid-19th century.

CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery was established by the War Office in 1876 for the burial of the soldiers garrisoned at Verne Citadel (part of the harbour defence fortifications) and Royal Navy sailors based at Portland. In 1907 the site was transferred to the Admiralty, who went on to extend the site to the west in 1914.

Throughout the First World War, Portland Harbour was used regularly for training exercises and patrols for German U-boats. There are 67 burials from the First World War, 5 of which are unidentified. In addition, there is a Special Memorial to a casualty buried in Portland (St. George) Churchyard.

After the War the maintenance of the Cemetery was passed to the Imperial War Graves Commission and in November 1926, the Cross of Sacrifice was unveiled in the presence of detachments from ships stationed at Portland and the local garrison.

With the outbreak of the Second World War, Portland Harbour continued hosting training exercises. However, after Germany’s successful invasion of France, the naval base quickly became the target of air attacks.

By May 1944, both Portland Harbour and Weymouth Harbour were used as part of the D-Day preparations. They were major embarkation points for American troops, particularly the US 1st Division who embarked for ‘Omaha Beach’ in June 1944.

There are 103 burials (including 1 Norwegian Merchant Navy seaman and 12 German airmen), 10 of which are unidentified, from the Second World War, the majority of which are in the Church of England section, near the Cross of Sacrifice.

The Cemetery was extended eastwards in the mid-20th century, where many post-Second World War burials are found.

In 1996 the Naval base at Portland was closed.
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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Norwegian Steamship Bokn departed Bary Docks on the 7th July 1942 with a cargo of coal for Portsmouth and joined eastbound coastal convoy WP-183.

She was attached by E-boats of 2nd S-Flottille on the 9th July when in Lyme Bay between Dartmouth and Portland. The Norwegian D/S Kongshaug was commodore ship (also sunk, as was the Norwegian D/S Røsten)). The British destroyer Brocklesby was escorting the convoy.

It appears that Kongshaug was the first ship to get hit and as Bokn was herself fired upon from both sides she had to sail past the 14 survivors in the water (they were picked up by Brocklesby within an hour). A little over 20 minutes later Bokn went straight down after having been hit in hatch No. 2 by a torpedo from the fast attack boat S-70 (Klose) at about 01:27hrs, 4 men went down with the suction as the ship sank, but surfaced again and were able to climb onto a raft. They were picked up by the escort a couple of hours later and taken to Portsmouth. The 4 had seen the lifebelt light from a shipmate but the wind and current had prevented them from reaching him. 12 had died, 8 of whom were Norwegian.

The captain’s body was later found in the water and he was buried here in Portland.
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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

HMS Delight was a D-class destroyer built for the Royal Navy in the early 1930s. Delight was initially assigned to the Mediterranean Fleet before she was transferred to the China Station in early 1935. She was temporarily deployed in the Red Sea during late 1935 during the Abyssinia Crisis, before returning to her duty station where she remained until mid-1939. Delight was transferred back to the Mediterranean Fleet just before the Second World War began in September 1939. She served with the Home Fleet during the Norwegian Campaign.

After departing Portland Harbour in daylight on the 29th July 1940, contrary to orders, the ship was detected by a Freya radar at Cherbourg and the Luftwaffe was alerted. At 19:25hrs, 12 Junkers Ju 87s belonging to III./Sturzkampfgeschwader 2 led by Gruppenkommandeur Walter Enneccerus attacked Delight, which was by now some 20 miles off Portland Bill. She was hit by a bomb which caused a major fire and a subsequent explosion. The ship sank later that evening having lost six of her company in the attack.

Delight currently lies at a maximum depth of 62 metres, broken into several sections. Her centre is upside down, her bow is broken off, and the stern is upright. As the wreck is designated as a protected place under the Protection of Military Remains Act 1986 it is illegal to enter the wreck without a licence or to interfere with the wreck or debris field in any way.
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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Twenty-eight Naval ratings and a midshipman lost their lives when a liberty launch from the aircraft carrier H.M.S. Illustrious, sank in a gale in Portland Harbour on the 17th October 1948. The launch had sailed from Weymouth Pier and had almost reached the carrier when the disaster took place. Most of the victims were young trainees.

The ill-fated launch sailed from Weymouth at about 22.30hrs on the Sunday night and was making her way to the Illustrious in a south-westerly gale with visibility at times reduced almost to nil by blinding rain squalls. About 20 men survived the tragedy, being either picked up by other boats or managing to swim to the carrier. Some owed their lives to the courage of men from the carrier who plunged into the sea to pick them up.

Weymouth lifeboat was called to the scene to search for survivors, but found only a number of lifebuoys and a couple of sailors' greatcoats. The lifeboat coxswain (Mr. H. Palmer) said : “We left harbour and the weather was very bad —blowing a gale. We had a message to proceed to the Illustrious and they told us to search the breakwater for men who might have clambered there or might be clinging to the rocks. We searched from end to end. Searchlights were played on the scene by nearby ships, but there was no sign of any living soul. I landed three men on the breakwater and they made a thorough search. We recovered a number of lifebuoys and pieces of wreckage. It was a wild night. The seas were a mass of foam and I don't think a man could live in it for long.”

After news of the disaster had been announced telephone inquiries from relatives of the ship's company poured into Portland base, and the first action of men who came ashore from the Illustrious on Monday night was to go to the Post Office or to telephone kiosks to send messages saying they were safe.
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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Corporal George Robertson died at the 50th Field Hospital US Army, Portland, on the 14th June 1944 from wounds inflicted at Port-en-Bessin, Normandy.
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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Jack Foreman Mantle was born in Wandsworth, London, on the 12th April 1917 and educated at Taunton's School in Southampton.

He was 23 years old and an acting leading seaman in the Royal Navy during the Second World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the Victoria Cross.

HMS Foylebank was a converted 5,500 ton merchant ship active during the Second World War. She was launched as the MV Foylebank by Bank Line (Andrew Weir Shipping) in 1930 and requisitioned by the Royal Navy in September 1939. She was converted into an anti-aircraft ship, equipped with 0.5 inch (12.7 mm) machine guns, two quad 2-pounder pom-poms and four twin high angle 4-inch gun turrets. The Foylebank saw action in Portland Harbour next to the Isle of Portland in Dorset, England. She arrived in Portland on 9 June 1940 for a build-up to anti-aircraft duties commanded by Captain Henry P. Wilson.

On the 4th July 1940 whilst the majority of her crew were at breakfast, unidentified aircraft were reported to the south. These were originally thought to be Allied aircraft returning to base but they turned out to be 26 Junkers Ju 87 Stuka dive bombers. These aircraft had the objective of disabling the Foylebank which was seen as a threat to their plans to destroy Britain's coastal shipping. In an eight-minute attack, two aircraft were shot down by the Foylebank but an estimated 22 bombs hit the ship and the ship listed to port, shrouded in smoke. She sank on the 5th July 1940. 176 out of a total crew of 298 were killed. Many more were wounded. Mantle was manning the starboard 20mm pom-pom gun, when his left was leg shattered by the blast from a bomb early in the action. Although wounded again many times, he remained at his gun, training and firing by hand when Foylebank's electric power failed, until he collapsed and died.

His citation in the London Gazette reads:

Leading Seaman Jack Mantle was in charge of the Starboard pom-pom when FOYLEBANK was attacked by enemy aircraft on the 4th of July, 1940. Early in the action his left leg was shattered by a bomb, but he stood fast at his gun and went on firing with hand-gear only; for the ship's electric power had failed. Almost at once he was wounded again in many places. Between his bursts of fire he had time to reflect on the grievous injuries of which he was soon to die; but his great courage bore him up till the end of the fight, when he fell by the gun he had so valiantly served.

This was only the second occasion that the Victoria Cross has been awarded for action in the United Kingdom.

The Foylebank was later salvaged in two sections. The forward section was broken up at Falmouth, Cornwall in 1947, the aft section was broken up at Thos W Ward Grays in Essex in 1952. Some fragments remain on the seabed and one piece has been recovered and presented to the Portland Museum.
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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 13th August 1940, Messerchmitt Bf 110 of V (Z) Lehrgeschwader 1 was on a mission to attack Portland. when it was attacked by RAF fighters

It was crewed by Lieutenant Günter Beck and Uffz Georg Lämmel, who was killed, rear gunner Uffz Karl Hoyer, who is listed as missing, and Hans Datz, who was made a prisoner of war.

Spent ammunition cases found at the crash site in 2016 show the rear gunner fired back at the RAF fighters.
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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

HMS Chasseur No.6 and HMS Chasseur No. 7 were both completed in early 1940, and sunk together by German gunfire on the 12th October 1940.
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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Junkers Ju 88A-4 1558 "M2 + LL" was shot down by flak on the 23rd March, 1942 and crashed at Davis Timber Yard, Chesilton, Portland, killing all on board.
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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 8th May 1941, Heinkel He1 11P-4 2951 G1+KL was shot down by a Bristol Beaufighter of 604 squadron and crashed into the sea off Portland Bill. It's crew were on the return leg oftheir mission against Liverpool.

The bodies of Willibald Amann, Alexander Wolff, Paul Tibusch and Cornelius Mildenberger were recovered from the sea on the 13th May 1941 but that of Bordfunker (wireless operator) Eduard Ante doesn't appear to have been found.
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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the night of the 3rd/4th May 942, Dornier Do 17Z-2 3306 "U5 + CW" was shot down by a Bristol Beaufighter of No.604 Sq., piloted by F/Lt Edward Dixon Crew & P/O Basil Duckett.

The plane crashed into the English Channel off Portland. The crew were: Franz Warwas, Helmut Fahle and Heinrich Pillmann. The only known grave is that of Warwas, whose body washed ashore on the 5th September 1942 (hence the date on the headstone).
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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Clemens Rudolf was the Observer on board Junkers Ju88A-4 14321 when it crashed into the English Channel while on a mission over the Dorset coast on the 8th May 1944.

His body was recovered and initially buried at sea by the Royal Navy but was later washed ashore and reburied at Portland. The bodies of the rest of the crew: Flugzeugführer [pilot] Karl Brobeil, Bordfunker [wireless operator] Alfred Lebherz and Bordschütze [air gunner] Günther Hellberg were never recovered.
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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 8th June 1944, HMS Minster sank near Utah Beach after hitting a mine. 58 men were lost. Today the wreck off the Minster lies close to the wreck off the USS Meredith
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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

HMS Boadicea was a B-class destroyer built for the Royal Navy around 1930. Initially assigned to the Mediterranean Fleet, she was transferred to the Home Fleet in 1936. Before her departure, the ship evacuated civilians from Spain during the beginning of the Spanish Civil War of 1936–1939. Boadicea later spent considerable time in Spanish waters, enforcing the arms blockade imposed by Britain and France on both sides of the conflict.

During World War II, the ship spent the bulk of the war on convoy escort duty in British waters and participated in the Battle of the Atlantic, Operation Torch, the Russian Convoys, and in the Normandy landings.

She was sunk on the 13th June 1944, off Portland Bill, by German aircraft while escorting a convoy of merchant ships to France. Sources differ as to the weapons used and the aircraft that carried them; some say Fritz X missiles fired by Dornier Do 217s belonging to KG 100 or torpedoes dropped by Junkers Ju 88s. The weapons caused a magazine explosion and Boadicea sank quickly, with only 12 of her crew of 182 surviving.

Her wreck is 16 miles southwest of the Isle of Portland. Her bow is blown off forward of the engine rooms and her stern section is upright and reasonably intact. The wreck site is designated as a protected place under the Protection of Military Remains Act 1986.
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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

HMS Blackwood was a Captain-class frigate of the Evarts-class of destroyer escort, originally commissioned to be built for the U.S. Navy. Before she was finished in 1942, she was transferred to the Royal Navy under the terms of Lend-Lease.

Blackwood was built by Boston Navy Yard, Massachusetts, United States and commissioned into the Royal Navy on the 27thMarch 1943. She saw service on anti-submarine patrols and as a convoy escort. On the 23rd November 1943, she and the frigates HMS Bazely and HMS Drury sank the U-boat U-648 north-east of the Azores, and two days later on the 25th November, Bazely and Blackwood sank U-600 north of Punta Delgada.

Blackwood was part of the 4th Escort Group and was on patrol in the western approaches to the English Channel on the 15th June 1944, covering ships bound for the allied invasion of Normandy, when she was sighted by U-764, which fired a Gnat at her. Blackwood was hit and damaged, killing 57 of the crew. She was taken under tow, but foundered off Portland Bill the following day. The wreck lies in 60 meters of water, and is designated as a protected place under the Protection of Military Remains Act 1986.

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CWGC Portland Royal Naval Cemetery - Portland, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

During the First World War, thousands of wounded Anzacs were evacuated to England with Weymouth identified as an ideal site for their recuperation. The influx of antipodean soldiers had an enduring impact on the resort which was affectionately dubbed "Wey-Aussie" by its wartime visitors. The first hutted camp, complete with cook house, shower block, gymnasium and orthopaedic recovery unit was set up at Monte Video in Chickerell, near the site of the Granby Industrial estate today.

Weymouth was chosen because of its existing army camp facilities, which were emptying as British soldiers completed their training and headed for the trenches in France. But the seaside climate also lent itself to rest and recuperation - soldiers in their light blue uniforms, pushing others in wheelchairs became a common sight on the seafront.

A reporter from the Melbourne Argos visited the Chickerell camp, describing it as "an ideal place with warm sea breezes and slopes lined with purple heather that lay between the camp and the sea".

Weymouth became a depot for Australian forces in 1916 and 83 of the 147 First World War burials in Melcome Regis Cemetery are of Australian servicemen; most of these graves are scattered in the old part. The 36 Second World War burials are in the extension. The cemetery also contains seven war graves of other nationalties and one non-war burial.

CWGC Melcombe Regis Cemetery, located in the town, contains147 First World War burials of which 83 are of Australian servicemen; most of these graves are scattered in the old part with the the 36 Second World War burials in the extension.
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CWGC Melcombe Regis Cemetery - Weymouth, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Melcombe Regis Cemetery - Weymouth, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Melcombe Regis Cemetery - Weymouth, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Melcombe Regis Cemetery - Weymouth, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Melcombe Regis Cemetery - Weymouth, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Melcombe Regis Cemetery - Weymouth, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 2nd April 1942, Weymouth was hit by the first diving bombing attack on the town. 20 were killed and 60 injured.
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CWGC Melcombe Regis Cemetery - Weymouth, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Melcombe Regis Cemetery - Weymouth, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the night of the 3rd/4th March 1945, 234 aircraft took part in a raid on Kamen, to attack a synthetic oil plant in the Bergkamen district.

The oil refinery was severely damaged and no further production was possible.

One of the aircraft taking part was Handley Page Halifax III NR179. Its crew has successfully completed the operation but on their return to RAF Driffield, the airfield lights were turned out. They set course for an alternative airfield but were immediately attacked by a Junkers Ju 88 intruder and crashed near the airfield

Flight Engineer Walter Edward Welsh was killed along with all of the crew.

Luftwaffe operation 'Unternehmen Gisela' took place this night. Large numbers of night-fighters were ordered to intrude as the bombers returned to their bases. The losses were high on both sides.
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CWGC Melcombe Regis Cemetery - Weymouth, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

This made the trip for me...I stumbled across the grave of Thomas Saberi and upon a bit of research while I was there, discovered he is a long distant relative. I still trying to find out more information of how he ended up in Weymouth in 1940, but it was a great discovery!

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CWGC Melcombe Regis Cemetery - Weymouth, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The tactics employed by the British in 1940 ensured that ocean-going vessels were protected in convoys while they travelled down the channel and out into the Atlantic. Once a convoy was in open water, and theoretically clear of U-boat attacks, the ships then scattered. In this way, the U-boat threat was nullified without vast convoys crossing the Atlantic. This had to be revised later in the war as the U-boats became more successful.

SS Terlings suffered damage during a German attack on convoy OA178 but she was repaired within a month and during June 1940 she went back into service. She joined CW7 for protection in the Channel until she could get clear of German attacks. On the afternoon of the 21st July 1940, SS Terlings was passing the Isle of Wight when the Luftwaffe found the convoy and attacked. The attack was from the rear of the convoy and the ship was hit nine times, with the loss of eight men.
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CWGC Melcombe Regis Cemetery - Weymouth, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Melcombe Regis Cemetery - Weymouth, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

User avatar
SuffolkBlue
Posts: 1390
Joined: Sun 31 Aug 2008, 7:31 pm
Location: Bury St. Edmunds

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 29/04/2021**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

RAF Warmwell was a Royal Air Force station from 1937 to 1946. During the Second World War it was used by the Royal Air Force and the United States Army Air Forces Ninth Air Force.

RAF Warmwell originally opened in May 1937 as a landing ground named RAF Woodsford, for units carrying out air-to-ground firing and bombing on ranges set up off the south coast of Dorset at Chesil Bank. With the airfield code of 'XW' it was renamed RAF Warmwell in July 1938 due to possible confusion with Woodford, near Manchester.

After the use by squadrons using the ranges diminished, and as the Second World War started more and more units were based here to act as fighter defence for the important naval facilities at Portland and Portsmouth, as well as working in 10 Group as part of the fighter defences for the south-west of England. Warmwell's three runways remained grass-surfaced for its entire life even though as the war progressed, and the emphasis became on intruding into German-occupied Europe, many intruder units were based here, using the Supermarine Spitfire, Hawker Hurricane and Tempest, and the Westland Whirlwind.

Although USAAF-marked aircraft were seen at Warmwell from July 1942 it was not until March 1944 that the base came under American control. While under USAAF control, Warmwell was known as USAAF Station AAF-454 for security reasons, and by which it was referred to instead of location.

CWGC Warmwell (Holy Trinity) Churchyard and Extension contains 22 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 2 of which are unidentified.

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CWGC Warmwell (Holy Trinity) Churchyard and Extension - Warmwell, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Jaroslav Hlavac was born in Petrvald, Czechoslovakia on the 11th September 1914 and was serving in the Czech Air Force in 1939 when the country was taken over by the Germans.

He moved with Czech units through Poland and France, where he is recorded as serving with CIC No. 6, Groupe de Chasse III./7 and Groupe de Chasse I./6.

He escaped to England in June 1940 and was sent to 6 OTU RAF Sutton Bridge to convert to Hawker Hurricanes. He joined 79 Squadron at Pembrey on the 11th September and then moved to 56 squadron at Boscombe Down on the 8th October.

On the 10th October 1940, he was shot down and killed when his Hawker Hurricane P3421 crashed at Manor Farm, west of Wareham.
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CWGC Warmwell (Holy Trinity) Churchyard and Extension - Warmwell, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Harold John Akroyd was born on the 6th September 1913 in Banbury. He attended Bishop Wordsworth School and Clarks College Ealing.

He was employed by Middlesex Council as Assistant to the Relieving Officer and joined the RAFVR in January 1937 as an Airman u/t Pilot, in his spare time he was a flying instructor at Handsworth. He married Irene Willsmer in July 1939 in Brentford.

Akroyd was called up on the 1st September 1939, ending up with 152 Squadron at Acklington at the start of the Battle of Britain.

In mid-July the squadron moved south to Warmwell, in Dorset. On the 15th August 1940 Akroyd claimed a Junkers Ju87 destroyed. On the same day he returned to Warmwell in the late afternoon after a combat over Portland with a damaged aircraft. The rudder was jammed but he landed Supermarine Spitfire R6910 safely.

In combat with enemy fighters over Lyme Regis in the afternoon of the 7th October, 1940 Akroyd was shot down. His aircraft, Supermarine Spitfire N3039, crashed and burned out at Nutmead, Shillingstone.

He was severely burned and died the next day.
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CWGC Warmwell (Holy Trinity) Churchyard and Extension - Warmwell, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Terence Gunion Lovell-Gregg, the son of a doctor, was born in Wanganui, New Zealand on the 19th September 1912 and was educated at Nelson College. He was a brilliant scholar and intended to enter Otago University to study medicine but was held back because of his youth. He took flying lessons
and became the youngest qualified pilot in Australasia. He applied for a short service commission in the RAF in July 1930 but was considered 'too weak' and advised to take up rugby to improve his physique.

Lovell-Gregg travelled to England at his own expense in October 1930 and successfully applied to enter the RAF. He went to the RAF Depot, Uxbridge on the 13th March 1931 and two weeks later was posted to 5 FTS, Sealand. With training completed he joined 41 Squadron at Northolt on the 8th March 1932.

Lovell-Gregg went to CFS, Wittering for an instructor's course on the 25th September 1932 but on the 28th February 1933 he was posted to 30 Squadron, operating in Wapitis from Mosul, Iraq. He returned to the UK in February 1935 and after a Floatplane Conversion Course at Calshot he returned to CFS, then at Upavon, for another instructors course. In February 1936 Lovell-Gregg was posted to 3 FTS, Grantham, on the instructing staff.

On the 16th September 1938, he went on Flying Examining Officer duties at HQ 26 Group at Hendon. Shortly after the outbreak of war Lovell-Gregg went to 15 FTS, Lossiemouth, as an instructor.

Lovell-Gregg was then posted to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on the 26th May 1940 and after converting to Hawker Hurricanes he joined 87 Squadron at Church Fenton on the 15th June as a supernumerary. He took command on the 12th July when the CO was posted away. Aware of his lack of operational experience, Lovell-Gregg allowed the experienced Flight Commanders to lead the squadron until he felt able to do so.

On the 15th August 1940, the squadron was scrambled at 17:30 hrs to intercept forty Junkers Ju87’s, escorted by twenty Me110’s and sixty Me109’s. Lovell-Gregg led the squadron out of the sun in line-astern, straight at the 110’s. His Hurricane was hit and caught fire. He came down from 15,000 feet, apparently under control and heading for Warmwell. Eye-witnesses said that the pilot appeared to change his mind and he circled the Abbotsbury area, skimmed low across a wood and a ploughed field and crashed in a copse, striking a large oak tree. Lovell-Gregg was thrown clear but was already dead when reached.
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CWGC Warmwell (Holy Trinity) Churchyard and Extension - Warmwell, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Sidney Richard Ernest Wakeling was born in 1919 in Paddington, London and educated at Latimer Grammar School, Kensington. He joined the RAFVR about April 1939 as an Airman u/t Pilot. He was called up on the 1st September 1939.

After completing his training he was posted to 87 Squadron at Church Fenton in early July 1940.

In combat over Portland on the 25th August 1940, Wakeling was shot down and killed. His Hawker Hurricane, V7250, came down at New Barn, Bradford Peverell near Dorchester.
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CWGC Warmwell (Holy Trinity) Churchyard and Extension - Warmwell, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

John Connelly Kennedy was born in Sydney, Australia on the 29th May 1917 and educated at St Charles College, Waverley. He joined the RAAF in 1936 and carried out his flying training at Point Cook. He left Australia in July 1937 and transferred to the RAF on a short service commission in August.

Kennedy was posted to No.1 FTS Leuchars for a short flying course after which he joined 65 Squadron at Hornchurch on the 19th December 1937. Promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant, Kennedy was posted to 238 Squadron at Middle Wallop as a Flight Commander on the 31st May 1940.

After attacking a Dornier Do17 over Chesil Beach on the 13th July 1940, Kennedy's aircraft was attacked by German fighters and he dived towards the coast. As he approached to make a forced-landing on the shore, he stalled and crashed at Southdown, Littlemore trying to avoid high tension cables.

Kennedy, who may have been wounded, was killed in the crash.
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CWGC Warmwell (Holy Trinity) Churchyard and Extension - Warmwell, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Lancelot Dalrymple Sandes was born 1913, the son of Robert Dalrymple Sandes and Ruby Hilda Lamb. He returned to Britain from India with his entire family in 1923.

Along with his brothers, he attended Bedford Modern School in Bedford. He was a pilot officer in the 59 Squadron and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for bravery in action. On one encounter on the 14th July 1940, he was flying a Bristol Blenheim Bomber IV and was attacked by four Messerschmitt Bf109s The navigator was wounded and the aircraft badly damaged. They got back to RAF Thorney Island and crash-landed, with all surviving on board.

On the 26th March 1941, he was on board Bristol Blenheim Bomber IV V6065 returning from a sortie to Brest when it crashed in fog at Winterbourne Abbas, Dorset. The aircraft was engulfed and destroyed by fire and all crew were killed.
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CWGC Warmwell (Holy Trinity) Churchyard and Extension - Warmwell, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Warmwell (Holy Trinity) Churchyard and Extension - Warmwell, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Alan Norman Feary was born in Derby on the 18th April 1912. He was educated at Derby Municipal Secondary School and worked in the Borough Treasurer's Department. He joined the RAFVR in July 1936 and did his flying training at Burnaston aerodrome. Awarded his flying badge on the 18th November 1938, Feary was called up on the 1st September 1939. He was posted to 9 FTS, Hullavington for advanced training in December.

On the 6th April 194, he went to 5 OTU, Aston Down, where he converted to Bristol Blenheims before joining 600 Squadron at Manston on the 4th May. He was then posted to 609 Squadron at Northolt on the 11th June 1940.

He shared in the destruction of a Ju88 on the 18th July, destroyed a Me109 on the 12th August and destroyed a Ju87 and damaged a Me110 on the 13th. The next day, he shot down a Ju88, which had just bombed Middle Wallop, killing some airmen who were trying to close the doors of one hangar. The bomb went through the roof and blew the doors off, which fell on the airmen, crushing them. Feary, already airborne, shot the enemy aircraft down about thirty seconds later. It crashed five miles away.

He was killed on the 7th October 1940 when he was shot down in a surprise attack by Me109’s over Weymouth. He baled out but was too low. His Supermarine Spitfire, N3238, crashed at Watercombe Farm, south of Warmwell.
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CWGC Warmwell (Holy Trinity) Churchyard and Extension - Warmwell, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the Saturday 24th October 1942, Pilot Derek Dundonald Audley was performing formation practice, tail chasing and aerobatics over RAF Warmwell. Unfortunately during these aerobatics, his Hawker Typhoon was seen to break up at 18,000 ft, scattering debris over 5 miles. He was buried on the afternoon of the 27th October 1942 in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity, Warmwell.
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CWGC Warmwell (Holy Trinity) Churchyard and Extension - Warmwell, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 9th September 1941, Pilot Tadeusz Wlodzimierz Pytlak took off from RAF Warmwell in Hawker Hurricane IIb Z3676 on a training mission.

He was tasked with shooting at an aircraft silhouette target suspended between two pylons. Perhaps through misjudgement, he hit one of the pylons and the Hurricane plunged into Weymouth Bay, with the aircraft sinking immediately. His body was recovered and buried here in the churchyard.
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CWGC Warmwell (Holy Trinity) Churchyard and Extension - Warmwell, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

George Benjamin Holt Birdsell joined the RAF in January 1938, and became acting Pilot Officer, but left the service a few months later. He rejoined on the outbreak of war as an Observe and had taken part in more than twenty raids over Germany.

On the 3rd April 1941, be took off from RAF West Raynham in Bristol Blenheim T2439 on a mission to Brest. On his return, the Blenheim crashed and exploded near Dorchester while trying to locate Boscombe Down.
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CWGC Warmwell (Holy Trinity) Churchyard and Extension - Warmwell, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Edgar Brearley was killed whilst flying in Westland Whirlwind I, P6995 of No 263 Sqn, which came down in the Channel during a night intruder sortie on the 16th April 1943. It is presumed that he was shot down and his body washed ashore.
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CWGC Warmwell (Holy Trinity) Churchyard and Extension - Warmwell, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

A few miles down the road is CWGC Wool (Holy Rood) Churchyard and Extension. The nearby camps at Bovington and Lulworth were originally established in 1899 as an infantry training area and ranges. In 1916, they became training camps for the Heavy Branch of the Machine Gun Corps which relocated from Norfolk. The Heavy Branch was responsible for the operation of the tank in the British Army. In 1917 the Heavy Branch split from the Machine Gun Corps to become the Tank Corps, with the Depot and Central Schools being based at Bovington.

In 1937 the Central Schools became the Armoured Fighting Vehicles School, with driving and maintenance training at Bovington and gunnery at Lulworth. The School became known as the Royal Armoured Corps Centre in 1947, now renamed The Armour Centre.

Most of those buried dies of illness or accidents on the ranges during the First World War.
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CWGC Wool (Holy Rood) Churchyard and Extension - Wool, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Wool (Holy Rood) Churchyard and Extension - Wool, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Wool (Holy Rood) Churchyard and Extension - Wool, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Wool (Holy Rood) Churchyard and Extension - Wool, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Wool (Holy Rood) Churchyard and Extension - Wool, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

CWGC Wareham Cemetery contains 49 First World War burials and 15 from the Second World War, 5 being unidentified. The cemetery also contains 12 German burials, 1 being an unidentified airman.

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CWGC Wareham Cemetery - Wareham, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Private Henry Edward Davies was born at Port Pirie, South Australia in 1891. He enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force (A.I.F.) on the 19th February 1915 as a 23 year old Fisherman from Goolwa, South Australia.

He was posted to Egypt before being sent to France on the 21st March, 1916. He was transferred to the 7th Brigade Machine Gun Company at Rue Maile on the 13th April, 1916.

He was admitted to 3rd Australian Field Ambulance in Belgium on the 8th September, 1916 with Ppeurodynia & later invalided to England where he was admitted to 2nd Western General Hospital. He was discharged & transferred to No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth on the 12th November 1916 then transferred to No. 4 Command Depot at Wareham on the 18th January, 1917.

He was accidentally killed by a motor car accident on the 20th January 1917 on Old Christchurch Road, Bournemouth, due to a fractured skull. An Inquest was held at Bournemouth on the the 23rd January 1917 which recorded “no blame attachable to anyone.”
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CWGC Wareham Cemetery - Wareham, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Wareham Cemetery - Wareham, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Wareham Cemetery - Wareham, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Wareham Cemetery - Wareham, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On 18th September 1942 the crew of Vickers Wellington BJ976 were undertaking a training flight and left RAF Bircotes, on the Yorkshire / Nottinghamshire border, at 00.40hrs for a night time bombing practice. At 01.30hrs the aircraft had returned to the airfield but had then taken off again (possibly overshooting a landing), it was then seen to climb away but crashed near the village of Tickhill, just inside Yorkshire. The crew of four were sadly killed

Pilot George Nicol is buried here in his home town.
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CWGC Wareham Cemetery - Wareham, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 25th April 1944, the crew of Junkers Ju 188E-2 180414 "U5 + GH" were on their return leg after a bombing raid on Bristol when their aircraft was shot down by 3.7 inch AA guns from 17,000 feet and crashed at Salterns Wood, Arne, near Wareham, at 02:15 hours.

All four crew members were killed:
Uffz Heinrich Schnuer,
Ogefr Wolfgang Biegerl
Fw Horst Huffzky,
Ogefr Theophil Joretzki
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CWGC Wareham Cemetery - Wareham, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Wareham Cemetery - Wareham, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Wareham Cemetery - Wareham, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Wareham Cemetery - Wareham, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Wareham Cemetery - Wareham, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 22nd May 1941, Heinkel He 111H-8 3974 "1G + ZM" of 4/KG-27, clipped the coastal cliffs whilst low flying in poor visibility and crashed at Chideock Farm, Chaldon Herring, Dorset.

Friedrich Wilhelm Bartels & Heinrich Grimme both survived the crash and became POW's , but Hans Funk and Gefr Konrad Köhler were both killed. Grimmel died in captivity on the 15th August 1941.
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CWGC Wareham Cemetery - Wareham, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 30th September 1940, Heinkel He111P-2 G1+AM of 4./KG55 was shot down by Hawker Hurricanes of Nos. 238 and 504 Squadrons during a sortie to attack Westland Aircraft Works at Yeovil. The aircraft crashed in the Channel south of Portland Bill.

BO Uffz Rudolf Kübler baled out but was killed, FF Uffz Emil Eggert, BF Obergefr Willy Geyer, BS Gefr Willi Biedermann, and BM Gefr Wilhelm Rösel were all listed as missing.

Despite a search, Rudolf Kübler was not found until his body was discovered buried under seaweed at Marshall's slipway in Kimmeridge Bay on the 11th November 1940.
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CWGC Wareham Cemetery - Wareham, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 27th Septemberb 1940, Obltn Artur Niebuhr and radio operator Uffz Klaus Theisen were flying Messerschmitt Bf 110C-4 (3U+1M) of 4./ZG 26, which was providing fighter cover for Heinkel He 111s of KG 55 attempting to attack the Bristol Aeroplane Company's factory at Filton.

They were first attacked Supermarine Spitfire I of No. 609 Squadron, flown by Pilot Officer M E Staples. Their aircraft is seen banking steeply to port as it tries to avoid Staples' gun fire in this YouTube video, at 7.03.



Their aircraft was badly damaged during this attack and they were eventually brought down by Pilot Officer Watson of No. 152 Sqn, with the aircraft crashing into Salterns Copse near Wareham, killing both of the crew members,
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CWGC Wareham Cemetery - Wareham, Dorset, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The two site in Bournemouth had by now closed for the day, so the final location was CWGC Brockenhurst (St. Nicholas) Churchyard. I arrived just after the ANZAC Day service had concluded.

Due to its proximity to the port of Southampton, its railway connections and an abundance of large houses in the area, Brockenhurst was chosen in 1915 by the War Office to become a hospital centre. Initially, Lady Hardinge's Hospital (named after the wife of the Viceroy of India) for the Indian troops of the Lahore and Meerut Divisions was established south of the village. This was then replaced by No.1 New Zealand General Hospital in June 1916, after the Indian Divisions were replaced by ANZAC troops. The New Zealand Hospital remained at Brockenhurst until closed early in 1919. The churchyard contains 106 graves of the First War, of which one hundred are in the New Zealand plot. In addition to the 93 New Zealand graves, there are also three Indian and three unidentified Belgian civilians (employed at the Sopley Forestry camp). On the East side of the New Zealand plot is memorial incorporating a Cross.

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CWGC Brockenhurst (St. Nicholas) Churchyard - Brockenhurst, Hampshire, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Brockenhurst (St. Nicholas) Churchyard - Brockenhurst, Hampshire, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Brockenhurst (St. Nicholas) Churchyard - Brockenhurst, Hampshire, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Brockenhurst (St. Nicholas) Churchyard - Brockenhurst, Hampshire, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Brockenhurst (St. Nicholas) Churchyard - Brockenhurst, Hampshire, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Brockenhurst (St. Nicholas) Churchyard - Brockenhurst, Hampshire, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Brockenhurst (St. Nicholas) Churchyard - Brockenhurst, Hampshire, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Brockenhurst (St. Nicholas) Churchyard - Brockenhurst, Hampshire, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Brockenhurst (St. Nicholas) Churchyard - Brockenhurst, Hampshire, Sunday 25th April 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

User avatar
SuffolkBlue
Posts: 1390
Joined: Sun 31 Aug 2008, 7:31 pm
Location: Bury St. Edmunds

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 25/05/2021**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

CWGC Cherry Hinton (St Andrew) Churchyard is located in the outer suburbs of Cambridge, under the approach of the citys airport.

There are 17 casualties of both world wars buried here, with a small number making up a war grave plot.

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CWGC Cherry Hinton (St Andrew) Churchyard - Cherry Hinton, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, Wednesday 19th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Frederick Cecil Harrold was born on 17th May 1917 and joined the RAF on a short service commission in July 1939. He completed his training and went to 5 OTU Aston Down.

He moved to 151 Squadron at Stapleford on the 26th August 1940 and then to 501 Squadron at Kenley on the 26th September. On the 28th September, he was shot down by Me109's and killed. His Hawker Hurricane, P3417, crashed at the Strawberry Plantations, College House, Ulcombe and burned out.
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CWGC Cherry Hinton (St Andrew) Churchyard - Cherry Hinton, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, Wednesday 19th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Donald Custerson was killed on the 4th February 1941 when his Bristol Blenheim IV, TR-D of No 59 Sqn, crashed on take off from Thorney Island and collided with another aircraft on the airfield.
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CWGC Cherry Hinton (St Andrew) Churchyard - Cherry Hinton, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, Wednesday 19th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Donald Ronald Charles Mace was killed on the 23rd September 1943 when his Supermarine Spitfire VB, AD260 of No 66 Sqn collided with Spitfire EP639 on a return from a sweep over occupied Europe and crashed near Perranporth.
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CWGC Cherry Hinton (St Andrew) Churchyard - Cherry Hinton, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, Wednesday 19th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

CWGC Soham Cemetery contains 22 casualties of both world wars, all of which are scattered across the site.

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CWGC Soham Cemetery - Soham, Cambridgeshire, Wednesday 19th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Private Clement Rouse of the 2nd Battalion, East Surrey Regiment died of wounds on the 16th May 1915, aged just 16.

Born in Soham, he was the fourth son of Henry, a farrier and general blacksmith and Rachel Rouse, of High St., Soham. All four of their sons enlisted but only two survived the war.

Clement was only fifteen when he enlisted.

He saw very heavy action in France and was wounded, brought back to a hospital on the south coast of England where he died of septicemia.
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CWGC Soham Cemetery - Soham, Cambridgeshire, Wednesday 19th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Private Frank Phillip Roote of the Suffolk Regiment died at home while on service on the 5th April 1919.

His brother, William Roote, died of wounds he received in France in 1917 and is buried in the same grave.
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CWGC Soham Cemetery - Soham, Cambridgeshire, Wednesday 19th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Soham Cemetery - Soham, Cambridgeshire, Wednesday 19th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Observer Maurice Hutt was killed on the 10th December 1942 when his Vickers Wellington IC L7867 crashed onto a mountainside near Fort William while on a training mission from RAF Lossiemouth.

He is buried here back in his home town.
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CWGC Soham Cemetery - Soham, Cambridgeshire, Wednesday 19th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Frederick Stephens DFC, RAAF, flew Avro Lancasters with 514 Squadron from RAF Waterbeach during the Second World War, including 44 missions over Germany.

During his tour of duty he met a war widow, Eunice Whittaker with a small son called Anthony, they fell in love and got engaged. After the war he was discharged from the RAAF and returned to Australia for a short time while Eunice and Anthony tried to join him but for some reason they were not allowed to emigrate. Frederick returned to England until the problem with her permit could be resolved and they lived in Cambridgeshire.

On the 17th September 1946, he began work with Scottish Airways and eight days later on the 25th September, they moved to Paisley in Scotland.

Just two days after their move, on the 27th September, he was flying a Dragon Rapide from Port Ellen to Renfrew. It was a foggy day and there was some kind of radio communication error and the plane crashed into Craigton Hill near Milngavie in Scotland.

Frederick and six others on board were killed.

The accident happened shortly before he and Eunice were due to marry.
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CWGC Soham Cemetery - Soham, Cambridgeshire, Wednesday 19th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Soham Cemetery - Soham, Cambridgeshire, Wednesday 19th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

User avatar
SuffolkBlue
Posts: 1390
Joined: Sun 31 Aug 2008, 7:31 pm
Location: Bury St. Edmunds

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 25/05/2021**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

RAF West Raynham is a former Royal Air Force station located near the town of Fakenham, Norfolk.

The airfield opened during May 1939 and was used by RAF Bomber Command during the Second World War with the loss of 86 aircraft.

The station closed in 1994, though the Ministry of Defence (MoD) retained it as a strategic reserve. Having lain derelict since closure, the station was deemed surplus to requirements by the MoD in 2004 and two years later was sold to the Welbeck Estate Group who resold the entire site in October 2007.

Within the picturesque grounds of Raynham Hall is St. Mary Churchyard, which contains Second World War and post war graves.

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CWGC East Raynham (St. Mary) Churchyard - East Raynham, Norfolk, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Raynham (St. Mary) Churchyard - East Raynham, Norfolk, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Air Chief Marshal Sir John Whitworth-Jones, GBE, KCB, was a pilot in the First World War and a senior Royal Air Force commander during the Second World War. After the latter he held several senior RAF appointments before his retirement in 1954.

He joined the territorial army in 1912 and went to France as a Bugler aged 18 with the 517th (2nd London) division of the Royal Engineers. He was commissioned as a second lieutenant on the Royal Flying Corps general list on the 13th April 1917. Later in the war he served as a pilot in No. 47 Squadron and No. 21 Squadron. He was made Officer Commanding No. 13 Squadron in 1931 and Officer Commanding No. 208 Squadron in 1933 before joining the Air Staff in the Deputy Directorate of Operations (Home) at the Air Ministry in 1936.

He served in the Second World War as Director of Fighter Operations from 1940, Air Officer Commanding No 9 (Fighter) Group from 1942 and Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff at South East Asia Command from 1943. He went on to be Director-General of Organisation at the Air Ministry in June 1945.

After the war he was Air Officer Commanding AHQ Malaya, Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief Technical Training Command and then Air Member for Supply and Organisation before retiring in 1954.
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CWGC East Raynham (St. Mary) Churchyard - East Raynham, Norfolk, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Flight Lieutenant Michael Edward Whitworth-Jones DFC, the son of Air Chief Marshal Sir John Whitworth-Jones, was killed whilst flying in de Havilland Venom FB Mk 1, WE261 of the Central Fighter Establishment which lost the starboard wing following an explosion during a ground attack trial on the ranges at Holbeach on the 28th July 1953.
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CWGC East Raynham (St. Mary) Churchyard - East Raynham, Norfolk, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 16th January 1956, English Electric Canberra PR 7 WT529 of the CFE (Central Fighter Establishment), dived into the ground at Sudbrooke, 6 miles north east of Lincoln, Lincolnshire, when a Trim Motor failed shortly after take-off from RAF Cranwell.

Both crew were killed. They were the pilot, Wing Commander Robert Bruce Cole DFC AFC, who at the time was commanding the Tactics Branch of the All-Weather Wing of the C.F.E. at West Raynham, and his staff officer, Squadron Leader Peter Needham AFC.

The wreckage was taken to No.54 Maintenance Unit (54 MU) at RAF Cambridge and then scrapped following the investigation.
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CWGC East Raynham (St. Mary) Churchyard - East Raynham, Norfolk, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot John Stuart Graham was on board Bristol Blenheim IV V5455 that took off from RAF West Raynham on the 8th June 1942 for a night intruder mission.

An engine failure led to the aircraft crashing at Fakenham, Norfolk. The crew managed to jettison the bombs before the crash, but were also all killed.
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CWGC East Raynham (St. Mary) Churchyard - East Raynham, Norfolk, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Air Gunner Francis John Drake-Carnell was killed on the 6th September 1940 when his Handley Page Hampden BI P4378 crashed at RAF West Raynham

He and his crew initially took off from RAF Hemswell for a successful attack on Hamburg. They landed at RAF West Raynham on their return but stalled, crashed and caught fire on takeoff when returning to their home station. The pilot was the only survivor.
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CWGC East Raynham (St. Mary) Churchyard - East Raynham, Norfolk, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Observer Kenneth Oswald Webster was on board Bristol Blenheim IV R3842 during a formation flying exercise from RAF West Raynham when the aircraft lost control, spun and crashed close to Great Massingham airfield on the 19th July 1940.
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CWGC East Raynham (St. Mary) Churchyard - East Raynham, Norfolk, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Donald Charles Tanner lost his life in North American Mitchell II FL206 when it spun and crashed near RAF West Raynham on a nighttime training mission on the 17th October 1942.
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CWGC East Raynham (St. Mary) Churchyard - East Raynham, Norfolk, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Constantine Oliver Joseph Pegge was born in Slough, Buckinghamshire in July 1914 and attended Kings School in Warwick. He joined the RAF on a short service commission in August 1938.

With his training completed, he was serving with 'B' Flight of No. 1 AACU, Carew Cheriton by November 1939. He crashed Hawker Henley L3283 at Farnborough on the 24th November on a ferry flight.

He moved from 'B' Flight to 'J' Flight No. 1 AACU, when it was formed at Farnborough on the 1st December 1939. It moved to Penrhos on the 16th February 1940.

He arrived at 6 OTU Sutton Bridge onthe 27th May 1940 and after converting to Spitfires joined 610 Squadron at Gravesend on the 16th June.

On the 8th July 1940, he claimed a Me109 destroyed, on the 12th August two more and on the 18th a Me109 destroyed and a He111 damaged. On the return to Biggin Hill his Spitfire, R6694, was damaged by a Me109 and then further damaged by running into a bomb crater on landing. He was unhurt.

On the 24th August he probably destroyed a Me109, claimed another destroyed on the the 28th and a He111 on the 30th. He was awarded the DFC (gazetted on the 22nd October 1940).

During his service with 610 at Acklington the following incident was recorded by Sgt. HD Denchfield:

'On 7th October our flight commander Joe Pegge led us off in a tight formation flying along the beaches and hopping over the dunes, heading towards Berwick. Suddenly he said, "Listen to this, you two". I looked across and he was holding a book in his right hand and flying with his left at just 100 feet. He was reading excerpts from the raunchy Kama Sutra and still managed to get over the dunes. When he was returning from honeymoon by train three of us decided to welcome him in our Spitfires, criss-crossing over the tops of the carriages at about 50 feet and in our boyish enthusiasm forgetting about telephone poles. He told us we were silly sods who had put his bride off flying for ever'.

In January 1941 he was presented with a silver tray by Welwyn Garden City. The reason for this is not recorded but the family understand that it was for shooting down a Heinkel 111 which was attacking Welwyn.

He married Elizabeth Elsie Florey at Hendon in March 1942.

On 9th June 1942 he was given command of 127 Squadron in the Western Desert. He destroyed a Me109 on the 8th July and two Ju87s on the 2nd September. He left the squadron in April 1943 and returned to the UK.

In September 1944 he went to 126 Squadron at Bradwell Bay as a supernumerary Squadron Leader. He took command of 131 Squadron at Friston in October and led it until June 1945. He was then posted to command 607 Squadron in Burma, which he did until its disbandment at Mingaladon on the 19th August 1945. Pegge was awarded a Bar to the DFC (gazetted 29th January 1946).

Staying on in the RAF post-war, he was granted substantive promotion to Squadron Leader with effect from August 1947 and he was granted a permanent commission on 22nd June 1948. On the 11th January 1949 he was one of the surviving Battle veterans that attended the unveiling of the Battle of Britain memorial window at the Rolls Royce Works Derby.

He was killed on the 9th May 1950 whilst flying in Gloster Meteor F4 VT234 of the Central Fighter Establishment, West Raynham. The aircraft flew into the Wash when descending in mist and fog whilst Pegge was flying as No.2 to a course pilot.

He was buried in East Raynham Churchyard on 16th June 1950.
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CWGC East Raynham (St. Mary) Churchyard - East Raynham, Norfolk, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

RAF Narborough was a military aerodrome in Norfolk operated in the First World War. It opened on the 28th May 1915, originally as a Royal Naval Air Station tasked with defending against Zeppelin raids. The airfield covered a 908-acre site, including 30 acres of buildings - making it the largest First World War airfield in Britain.

The airfield was transferred to the Royal Flying Corps in 1916, with the arrival of No. 35 Squadron of 7 Wing from Snarehill, operating Vickers F.B.5, Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2c and BE2e and Armstrong Whitworth FK3 aircraft. Initially the squadron trained as a Corps Reconnaissance unit, until moving to France on the 25th January 1917 equipped with the Armstrong Whitworth FK8.

Several other units operated from this airfield, including No. 48 Reserve, No. 50 Reserve, No. 53 Reserve Squadrons and No. 1 Training Squadron. No. 83 Squadron of 7 Wing arrived from Wyton in December 1917 for training in the night bomber role. On the 1st January 1918, No. 121 Squadron was formed here with Airco DH9 light bombers.

On the 11th November 1918, aircraft from nearby RAF Marham bombed Narborough with flour bags to celebrate the Armistice. RAF Narborough retaliated against Marham, sending its planes to bomb them with bags of soot.

No. 56, 60 and 64 Squadrons of 38 Wing arrived in February 1919, from the Western Front, but brought no aircraft. No. 64 Squadron disbanded on the 31st December 1919, while No. 56 and 60 Squadrons left for RAF Bircham Newton, with the station closing down and being returned to agriculture. Almost nothing remains of this airfield today, with the last hangar being demolished in mid 1977, having been damaged by gales.

CWGC Narborough (All Saints) Churchyard contains casualties who were lost flying from the aerodrome. During my visit an F-35 was conducting circuits at RAF Marham, located about a couple miles away. 100 years of aviation is still going strong in the area!

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CWGC Narborough (All Saints) Churchyard - Narborough, Norfolk, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Narborough (All Saints) Churchyard - Narborough, Norfolk, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr


Second Lieutenant Archibald Onslaw Farmer was killed whilst flying Royal Aircraft Factory RE8, A3570 of No 69 Training Sqn, when he jumped from the aircraft a few feet from the ground as it side-slipped following a structural failure on the 30th May 1918.
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CWGC Narborough (All Saints) Churchyard - Narborough, Norfolk, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On 14th April 1917, Trevor Dudley Hall requested he be allowed to enlist in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force as a private with 6 months leave of absence without pay so that he could qualify at the New Zealand Flying School in Kohimarama for the Aviator’s Certificate. He qualified for his Royal Aero Club’s Certificate on the 6th August 1917 at the Flying School and was called up in the 11th ballot on the 12th October 1917. Although he attested for service in the NZEF, he did not serve with that, but through joining the Flying School in New Zealand, he had duly qualified for admission in the Royal Flying Corps.

On the 13th October 1917, he left with the 30th Reinforcements on the Corinthic, arriving in Liverpool on the 8th December 1917 to join the Royal Air Force. On the 17th May 1918, he was reported as having completed his training at Reading along with a number of other New Zealanders, and was commissioned 2nd. He was appointed as an instructor a day after completing his training in England. As the best flyer his own instructor had ever put through, Alderton was given charge of incoming students.

On the 16th June 1918, when part of the 26 Training Squadron, RAF Narborough, his aircraft, a de Havilland Airco DH4, suffered an engine failure immediately after take-off and stalled on turning back towards the airfield, side-slipping into the ground. The pupil pilot, 2nd Lt J. S. L. Oakes RAF survived but Trevor Dudley Hall was killed in the crash.
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CWGC Narborough (All Saints) Churchyard - Narborough, Norfolk, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

RAF Downham Market opened as a satellite station for RAF Marham in the summer of 1942. The station was equipped with three concrete runways.

The first operational squadron at the station was 218 Squadron, operating Short Stirling aircraft, who arrived from Marham in July 1942. In August 1943, 623 Squadron formed at Downham, also operating Stirling aircraft. This Squadron was disbanded four months later, when the station was re-equipped with the Avro Lancaster. 214 Squadron operated briefly from Downham Market during December 1943 and January 1944.

In March 1944 the station passed to No. 8 Group, with 218 Squadron leaving for RAF Woolfox Lodge, being replaced by 635 Squadron, also flying the Lancaster. 571 Squadron, equipped with the de Havilland Mosquito, formed at Downham in April 1944, but had moved to RAF Oakington within a month.

608 Squadron re-formed at Downham in August, equipped with Canadian-built Mosquitos as part of No. 8 Group's policy of having one Lancaster and one Mosquito squadron at each base.

No. 608 and 635 Squadron's operated from Downham to the end of the war, and both were disbanded in late summer of 1945.

The cemetery in town contains a number of casualties from the airfield.

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CWGC Downham Market Cemetery - Downham Market, Norfolk, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot James Clark Greenwood was killed on the 14th June 1943 when his Miles Master II, AZ811 of No 17 (P) AFU, flew into the ground near Wisbech.
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CWGC Downham Market Cemetery - Downham Market, Norfolk, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 18th June 1943, Pilot Officer Harold James Andrews took off in Miles Master DL858 and detailed to carry out formation flying with P/O Blackmore.

P/O Blackmore reported very bad weather of low cloud, heavy rain and poor visibility on the flight and the aircraft were returning to base flying separately, but within sight of each other. The port wing of DL858 hit the top of a tall tree, and the aircraft crashed at 12:20 hours and caught fire. The pilot died of his wounds.
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CWGC Downham Market Cemetery - Downham Market, Norfolk, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the morning of the 4th June 1944, the crew of Avro Lancaster III ND841 boarded their aircraft at RAF Downham Market in preparation for an operation to Calais. This was to attack the coastal defences batteries in a deception raid in the run-up to D-Day.

Taking off at 00:28 hours, a swing developed in the aircraft and it crashed into a hangar, exploding soon afterwards. All the crew were killed.

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CWGC Downham Market Cemetery - Downham Market, Norfolk, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Downham Market Cemetery - Downham Market, Norfolk, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Downham Market Cemetery - Downham Market, Norfolk, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 17th July 1942, Pilot Peter Anselm Dorman was part of a three man crew flying in Avro Anson I R9640 from RAF Cark on a navigational mission over the Isle of Man.

The weather conditions deteriorated while they were flying over the north of the island . At about 11:30hrs, flying in low cloud, they hit the lower slopes of North Barrule, the second highest peak on the island.

Two of the crew were killed and one was found alive by a local farmer, but he sadly died a short time later.
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CWGC Downham Market Cemetery - Downham Market, Norfolk, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

There are 49 casualties are buried at CWGC Wisbech Cemetery.

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CWGC Wisbech Cemetery - Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Bernard Henson was born in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire on the 6th March 1914. His interest in flying was triggered by the Cobham Flying Circus which visited the area.

Henson joined the RAFVR on the 28th November 1938. The 1939 census showed him as home on leave at the Riverside Cafe in Wisbech. On the 26th June 1939 he married Eunice Patricia Whall at St. Augustines, Wisbech.

Called up on the 1st September 1939, he completed his training at 5 FTS Sealand on No. 45 Course, which ran from the 11th December 1939 to the 10th June 1940.

Posted directly to 32 Squadron at Biggin Hill in late June 1940 he was soon in action and claimed a Ju87 destroyed on the 3rd July and a Me109 damaged on the 19th July.

He probably destroyed a Do17 on the 15th August and destroyed another on the 18th. On this day he was hit by return fire during a combat over Biggn Hill and made a forced-landing at Otford in Hawker Hurricane V6536, with a slight wound on the face. He was discharged from hospital on the the 24th and rejoined the squadron.

On 28th August, he made a forced-landing near Linton-on-Ouse, in Hawker Hurricane N2409, during a transit flight from Biggin Hill to Acklington.

He was posted to 257 Squadron at Martlesham Heath on the 15th September 1940. He was reported 'Missing' on the 17th November 1940 after being shot down by Adolf Galland in an action ten miles east of Harwich, in Hawker Hurricane N2342. The aircraft was seen to impact onto Lighthouse Sunk, a sandbar off Harwich. A search revealed no trace of Henson.

On the 5th January 1941 his body was washed ashore near Dover and returned to Wisbech for burial here.
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CWGC Wisbech Cemetery - Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, Thursday 20th May 2021 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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