CWGC Cemeteries **updated 29/10/2020**

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SuffolkBlue
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Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 23/07/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

RAF Harwell is a former Royal Air Force station, near the village of Harwell, located 5 miles south east of Wantage, Oxfordshire.

The airfield was built by John Laing & Son at the junction of three parishes in 1935. The bulk lay within Chilton parish; about a third was in East Hendred; and the smallest portion was in Harwell. The first Commanding Officer, upon being asked what the name of the new airfield should be, responded that it should be named after the parish in which his house lay – and this happened to be Harwell.

From its opening in February 1937 until March 1944, various bomber squadrons were stationed at the airfield. On the outbreak of the Second World War, it became part of No. 38 Group RAF, initially used leaflet missions over France using Vickers Wellington bombers, later bombing raids on Bremen, Cologne and Essen. There were numerous Luftwaffe raids on the airfield from August 1940 until September 1941. The original grass field was replaced with concrete runways between July and November 1941.

The following squadrons were posted to Harwell:

No. 75 Squadron RAF.
No. 105 Squadron RAF.
No. 107 Squadron RAF.
No. 148 Squadron RAF.
No. 215 Squadron RAF.
No. 226 Squadron RAF.
No. 295 Squadron RAF.
No. 570 Squadron RAF.

In March 1944, it was reallocated to 30 Group Airborne Forces, where it mainly operated tug aircraft towing Airspeed Horsa gliders. These gliders were used in a number of operations including carrying troops into Normandy to secure vital strategic positions in advance of the main landings on D-Day. In fact the first glider-borne troops to arrive in Normandy on D-Day came from RAF Harwell. A memorial to the men who flew from RAF Harwell who were killed on this operation now exists at one edge of the old airfield site, and a memorial service is held there annually. The airfield was also used briefly for Special Operations Executive (SOE) operations between July and September 1944.

The RAF station was closed at the end of 1945 and the site transferred to the Ministry of Supply on the 1st January 1946, where it became the Atomic Energy Research Establishment. Over the years that reduced in scale and other science-based research moved in, such as the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in 1957. The site is now home to the Harwell Science and Innovation Campus.

CWGC Harwell Cemetery contains 66 Second World War burials, most of them forming a war graves plot, the majority of them made from the station. There is also one First World War burial in the cemetery, and one non-war service grave.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 28th November 1939, Wireless Operator Frederick Challenger Overall was on board Avro Anson I N5084 on a night time training mission from RAF Harwell when it crashed onto Exmoor, killing all five crew members.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Robert Andrew McConnochie and 2nd pilot Harry Maynard Walsh were part of a five man crew of Vickers Wellington IC Z8354 that were tasked with an Overseas Aircraft Delivery Unit flight for Malta via Gibraltar. They took off from RAF Harwell on the 23rd September 1941 but soon after, the port engine failed and the aircraft crashed into Jarn Mound of Boar's Hill trying to land at RAF Abingdon. All on board were killed.

The crash made the national press when a young German man who was living nearby filmed the wreckage and was arrested for spying and deported.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The crew of Vickers Wellington I, L4259, took off from RAF Hampstead Norris, Berkshire, on the 17th October 1940 on a training mission. While on circuits over the airfield, the port engine burst into flames. The aircraft stalled and dived into the ground. Pilot Wynton Scott Munday and Pilot George Thomas Watt both lost their lives.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

While on a training mission, Vickers Wellington IC HF855 overshot on landing at RAF Harwell and crashed into a field on the 26th April 1942. All six crew members were killed with three buried together here.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 25th August 1942, Vickers Wellington IC DV595 took off from RAF Harwell for a night time training mission. While flying over the Odstone ranges, Leicestershire, it collided with Wellington IC N2755.

DV595 came down with the loss of all on board, who are buried here. The pilot of N2775 from RAF Hampstead Norris regained control to make a single engine crash landing at RAF Stanton Harcourt.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Vickers Wellington IC N2808 stalled while avoiding tree & crashed near Wantage on the 17th October 1941. The crew were on a training mission from RAF Harwell at the time of the accident, with all on board killed.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Carl Alexis Bergsten of Far Hills, New Jersey, U.S.A, was part of a six man crew on a ferry flight from RAF Harwell to Gibraltar on the 25th October 1941. Vickers Wellington IC X9989 failed to gain height after taking off due to a faulty hydraulic system and crashed at Aldworth, Berkshire. All of the crew on board lost their lives.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Just after taking off RAF Harwell for a training mission on the 5th December 1942, the starboard engine on Vickers Wellington IC DV724 cut out. Before the crew could return to base the Wellington stalled and crashed at 21:12hrs in trees near Ardington, 2 miles from Wantage Berkshire.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The crew of Vickers Wellington IC HF906 boarded their aircraft at RAF Hampstead Norris for a training mission on the 3rd March 1943.

Not long after departure, the wireless equipment failed and the exercise was aborted. At around 20:30hrs, the Wellington was reported on approach to land, but this was abandoned in favour of another aircraft in the circuit. While so engaged, the bomber stalled from 100ft and smashed into The Bungalow, Common Barn Farmhouse, near Newbury, Berkshire, killing the crew.

The 2 occupants of the bungalow were also killed. Miss Playle was a nurse companion to Mrs Chiverton. They were aged 60 and 68 respectively.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Aircraftwoman 1st Class Kathleen Florence Seacole died on the 21st July 1942 of tuberculosis at the age of 22 years at the sanatorium near Henley.

Her parents, Joseph and Elsie Seacole lived at The Orchard, Wantage Road, Harwell.
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CWGC Harwell Cemetery - Harwell, Berkshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 23/07/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

During the Second World War, RAF Benson used the St. Helen Churchyard Extension, for crew lost flying from the airfield and the local area. CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension has 32 casualties buried here.

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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The crew of Vickers Wellington IC took off from RAF Mount Farm on the 18th April 1941 for circuit training over the airfield. Whilst trying to overshoot the runway, the aircraft lost power, stalled and crashed at 00:58hrs, hitting the corner of a farm building at Watlington, Oxfordshire.

Pilot Thomas Mackintosh Couper of Toronto, Ontario, Canada and one other crew member were killed.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Navigator Merton Lambert Horfield Rose was on board de Havilland Mosquito PR Mk IX LR407 when the engine cut and the aircraft stalled on approach to RAF Benson on the 8th January 1944. He and the pilot were both killed in the subsequent crash.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 26th November 1940, Navigator Antoni Henryk Ignaszak boarded Fairey Battle I L5071 at RAF Mount Farm for a training mission. The aircraft climbed to 1,000ft but then dived and crashed one mile north-west of airfield and burst into flames.

Two other crew members were also killed.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Sergeant Nicholas William Cantwell of Galway, Irish Republic, was killed while on leave in Euston Road, London, during an air raid on the city on the 20th September 1940.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

During the height of the Battle of France, Fairey Battle I K9374 took off from Bétheniville in North East France on the 14th May 1940 to attack German columns. Pilot Charles David Perry was hit by flak and the aircraft was badly damaged. Although severely wounded in the thigh and stomach he was able to fly the aircraft back to the vicinity of the airfield and crash land near Cauroy. He was immediately evacuated to England but sadly died in hospital on the 14th June 1940. He was awarded a DFM for his bravery.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Fairey Battle I L5079 crashed at Streatley, Reading, due to engine failure on the 30th September 1940. The pilot, Otakar Odstrcilek, who was on his first solo training mission from RAF Benson, was killed.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator / Air Gunner Maurice Vivian Everitt and his two crew members were killed on the 24th July 1940 when their Fairey Battle I L5482 hit high-tension cables and crashed near North Stoke, Oxfordshire when on a navigation exercise from RAF Benson.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Duncan Darrock Dunlop took off from RAF Chipping Warden at 09:30hrs for a training flight in Vickers Wellington IC Z8964 on the 4th June 1942. Forty minutes later, the aircraft flew into trees at Henley on Thames, Oxfordshire, killing all on board.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Observer Cyril Clifford Henderson was mortally injured at St. Pancras, London, an area badly hit during a bombing raid on the 19th September 1940. He died the next day.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 6th August 1940, Pilot 'Bricky' Arthur Vivian Fisher took off at 23:15hrs in Fairey Battle I L4943 on a solo night flight training exercise from RAF Benson. Shortly afterwards whilst climbing to 800 - 1000 ft, the aircraft was seen to swing to starboard then to port before flying into the ground and catching fire at Watlington.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Corporal Norman Grenville Jones was killed on 31st March 1941 as a result of enemy action at Mount Farm Satellite, Dorchester-on-Thames.
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CWGC Benson (St. Helen) Churchyard Extension - Benson, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 23/07/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

At the outbreak of the Second World War, RAF Upper Heyford, in Oxfordshire, was the home to units of RAF Bomber Command, specifically No. 18 and No. 57 (Bombing) Squadrons, forming No. 70 (Bomber) Wing of No. 2 (Bombing) Group. In response to what was perceived as a growing worldwide threat, Strategic Air Command decided to house a strong force of American bomber aircraft in England. It was decided to convert four airfields in and around Oxfordshire to serve as their regular stations. Upper Heyford was one of those selected, the others being RAF Brize Norton, RAF Fairford and RAF Greenham Common.

With the end of the Cold War, the presence of the 20th TFW was deemed no longer necessary in the United Kingdom and the USAF presence at RAF Upper Heyford was gradually run down. On the 15th December 1993 the flight line at RAF Upper Heyford was closed.

CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery came into use around 1920, when the churchyard ceased to be used for burials. It lies east of the churchyard, from which it is separated by a road. During the early part of the Second World War ground, in the south-western corner was set aside for service war burials and was used by the airfield.

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CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery - Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 17th September 1992, Capt. Jerry Lindh and Maj. David “Mike” McGuire were part of the 2 man crew in General Dynamics F-111E 68-0052, 55th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 20th Tactical Fighter Squadron, United States Air Force.

Their aircraft crashed on landing at runway 09, RAF Upper Heyford Runway 09. The module had been damaged in the initial ground impact, and subsequently did not achieve sufficient altitude to permit proper parachute deployment.

According to an eyewitness report:

"I was there-- we were having my going-away luncheon at the Three Horseshoes when the planes were coming in that day. Being a communicator, I'm not up to speed on all of the aviator terms, but I'll do my best to describe what I witnessed that afternoon.

The pub, which you know sits at the west end of Camp Road, is within rock-throwing distance of the runway, though we preferred to throw rocks at the peace campers. A few of us were outside and away from the main group recounting my "war" stories when the planes were coming in for the day.

It was a typical day in the armpit of USAFE. A couple of pints, rattled teeth, and an F111 enhanced hangover headache. At least until the last plane came in on approach-- my supervisor remarked, "that doesn't sound healthy!"

Our attention was focused a little north of the village proper (Upper Heyford) on the plane coming in about 200 feet off of the ground. The jet was making a horrible sputtering noise and looked to barely be in control-- I can only describe it as a wobbly wing-flapping with the wing tips alternatively going +/- 25-30 degrees with the right wing dipping furthest.

Just after clearing the road that skirts the village (Somerset Road, I think), and about 100 feet in the air, the plane rolled almost 150 degrees to the right going almost fully inverted. There was a small explosion less than 2 seconds before the plane went in just over the perimeter fence and impacted in a field just south of the runway. It appeared to us that the crew ejection capsule had shot straight into the ground.

We were later told by a friend in the RAPCON that the pilot reported a total hydraulic failure during the approach pattern. Upon their capsule's impact; one of the men died on impact, the other died a few hours later in the base hospital.
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CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery - Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Handley Page Hampden I P4301 hit trees and crashed near Charlton whilst trying to land at RAF Croughton on the 24th October 1941.

Pilot James Cornelius Hill and Wireless Operator / Air Gunner Robert Charles Dillon Jones were two of the four man crew who lost their lives.
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CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery - Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 20th September 1941, Pilot Nicholaas Petrus van der Merwe & Air Gunner Robert Legas were part of a four man crew in Handley Page Hampden I P5314 that took off from RAF Croughton on a night flying exercise.

As the aircraft was landing, it was shot down by a Junkers Ju88 intruder, with all four crew killed.
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CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery - Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Observer Jack Kenneth Howe was killed on the 29th September 1941 when his Handley Page Hampden I P5308 crashed into a hillside at Piddington, Oxfordshire, while on a bombing practice mission from RAF Upper Heyford.
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CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery - Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Bomb Aimer / Navigator Brian William Miller was killed, along with the rest of his crew, on the 10th October 1941. They got airborne from RAF Upper Heyford in Handley Page Hampden I P4319 for a night bombing exercise when their aircraft crashed.
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CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery - Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Joseph Jossie Goldman of Bloemfontein, Orange Free State, South Africa, was killed on the 19th June 1941 when his Handley Page Hampden I AD831 crashed hear RAF Upper Heyford on a training mission.
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CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery - Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 11th July 1941, the four man crew of Handley Page Hampden I AD849 took off for a training flight from RAF Upper Heyford. Their aircraft dived and crashed at Home Farm, Rousham,after take-off and it is believed the pilot struck his head and became unconscious. The crew are buried here together.
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CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery - Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

U/T Pilot Douglas Harry Montague Barrat lost his life on the 21st February 1941 when his Miles Master N7673 crashed near Banbury, Oxfordshire
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CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery - Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 7th February 1941, Handley Page Hampden I P1149 took off from RAF Upper Heyford on a daytime training mission. It immediately flew into another of the unit's aircraft (Hampden P1302), which was in the process of landing. Locked together, the two aircraft fell onto the airfield, where they began to burn.

Wireless Operator Harry James lost his life in P1149.
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CWGC Upper Heyford Cemetery - Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 28/07/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground was opened in November, 1940, and was used by the service personnel at nearby RAF Kidlington (now Oxford Airport).

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CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

U/T Flight Engineer Andrew Paton was killed whilst flying in Airrspeed Oxford I LX322 of No 2 (O) AFU, when it crashed in a flat spin near Rousham, Oxfordshire, on the 25th April 1944.
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CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Leo Albert Boire was born in Napierville, Monteregie Region, Quebec, Canada on the 8th January 1923. He joined the Royal Canadian Air Force, sent to England and was based at RAF Weston on the Green, Oxfordshire.

He was killed on a night flying exercise when his Airspeed Oxford was involved in mid-air collision on the 3rd June 1943 near Kingston Bagpuize.
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CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Following his training in Canada, Pilot Officer Jack Standish Banks was overseas in December 1940 and flew with to 75 Squadron, 214 Squadron and No 9 RAF Squadron. He completed thirty-one sorties as an air gunner and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal on the 13th April 1942

He received his Pilot Flying Badge on the 5th February 1943 and was assigned to 20(P) AFU on the 5th May 1943.

On the 3rd June 1943 while on active service at RAF Kidlington, he was a passenger in an Airspeed Oxford V3821 that was involved in a mid-air collision with another Oxford. Both planes spun into the ground and burst into flames and were completely destroyed.
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CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 27th June 1943, Airspeed Oxford HN578 took off at 00:50 hrs on a solo non operational flight detailed to practice instrument flying. The aircraft was due back at 02:05 hrs, but had not returned by 05:00 hrs. At 06:00 hrs, 3 aircraft searched without success. The aircraft had crashed at 01:00 hrs north of Tackley Airfield and the pilot, Flight Sergeant Langley, had been killed.
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CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Robert Leroy Keniston was killed whilst flying in de Havilland Tiger Moth II, T7190 of No 101 GOTU, when it flew into the ground at Islip in Oxfordshire, on the 2nd April 1942.
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CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Albert Farish Jackson was killed on the 26th July 1942 when his General Aircraft Hotspur II, BT685 of No 2 GTS, crashed after the tail broke off shortly after release from the tug.
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CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Zenon Slomkowski was serving with 2 AGS when died from natural causes in Hospital in Perth, Scotland, on the 30th November 1942. H
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CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

U/T Pilot Leading Aircraftman Leigh Brereton Sadleir Falkiner was killed whilst flying in Airspeed Oxford I, V3906 of No 15 SFTS, when it crashed after hitting HT cables near Bicester, on the 12th February 1942.
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CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

U/T Pilot Colin Paget Blair was killed whilst flying Airspeed Oxford II, W6629 of No 15 SFTS, which was shot down near Weston-on-the-Green in Oxfordshire by an intruder on the 13th August 1941.Image
CWGC Kidlington Burial Ground - Kidlington, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 28/07/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

During the First World War, the 3rd Southern General Hospital (an Oxfordshire Territorial Unit) was housed in the Examination Schools and a number of other buildings in Oxford. CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery contains 156 burials from the First World War, all in the war graves plot in section I/1. The cemetery was designated a Royal Air Force regional cemetery during the Second World War and was used by RAF stations in Berkshire and neighbouring counties. Practically all of the 516 Second World War burials (one of them unidentified) are in the war graves plot, which was extended from the section used during the First World War. In addition to the Commonwealth war graves,the cemetery contains almost 70 war graves of other nationalities.

At 730 casualties, it's the largest CWGC site in Oxfordshire.

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 24th April 1945, the crew of Avro Lancaster I, PD339, took off RAF Wing, Buckinghamshire at 16:40hrs. 15 minutes later, south of Northampton, their aircraft hit a tree while turning steeply to avoid cables, crashed and burned out on Hardingstone Lodge Farm. Of the seven crew only the two RAF air gunners survived, injured. The four RNZAF airmen were buried here on the 2nd May 1945. They were taking part in Operation Exodus, which involved a large scale airlift to repatriate some 75,000 recently liberated British prisoners of war from continental airfields to Britain. Lost on the first day of the 12-day operation, it is believed that PD339 was returning to its base after transporting one of the first batches of prisoners from Brussels to RAF Wing.

Air Bomber Ralph Franklin Carrodus and Pilot Cedric John Evans are two of the crew buried side by side.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Air Gunner RAF Gordon John Symonds was killed on 8th April 1945 when his Avro Lancaster HK788 caught fire shortly after take off on a mission to bomb Germany. The aircraft was diverted to RAF Abingdon but crashed 4-miles short of the airfield and exploded.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Short Stirling I, R9249, crashed while attempting a three-engine landing at RAF Chipping Warden, Northamptonshire, on the 22nd October 1943 while on a special navigation exercise from RAF Stradishall, Suffolk. The visibility was poor and it is assumed that the crew mistook one of the perimeter tracks for the runway. The aircraft clipped a tree and two houses as it came in.

Air Gunner Gregory Terence Duane died the next day from his injuries.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 15th February 1944, the four man crew of North American Mitchell II, FL194, took off from RAF Bicester, Oxforshire, for a training flight.
For unknown reasons, the aircraft crashed bear Buckingham, killing all on board, including Pilot Henri Jean Boots.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 21st June 1944, the crew of Short Stirling III EH940 were on a training mission from RAF Winthorpe when an engine burst into flames and the aircraft crashed at Kettlethorpe, near Lincoln, with the subsequent fire destroying several farm buildings.

Air Gunner William Henry Miller and four crew members were killed.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Armstrong Whitworth Whitley V BD271 took off from RAF Stanton Harcourt at 23:00hrs on the 9th April 1944 and detailed to carry out a cross country training flight. It is thought that structural failure occurred at around 02:10 hrs and the Whitley dived into the ground and burst into flames at White House Farm, Brightwell, 2 miles West of Wallingford, Oxfordshire. There were no survivors.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Armstrong Whitworth Whitley V T4337 crashed within a minute of takeoff from RAF Abingdon, onto Bessells Leigh firing range, on the 14th March 1944.
Navigator Allan Gainford Lillicoof Britannia Bay, Ontario, Canada, was killed in the crash.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator / Gunner Bernard Thomas Scammell DFM and the rest of the crew of Armstrong Whitworth Whitley V BD281 boarded their aircraft at RAF Abingdon on the 24th June 1943.

They were tasked to participate in Exercise Tucker, an army cooperation exercise involving no. 685 Amphibious Warfare Company, Royal Engineers.

Hi aircraft dived to near ground level in a mock attack on a bridge but whilst climbing away the port wing struck a tall tree. Out of control, the bomber crashed at Tythrop House, around 6 miles from Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire.

There were no survivors.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 14th November 1943, the crew of Armstrong Whitworth Whitley V AD688 took off from RAF Abingdon for a training mission. The pitot head tube iced up while at 13.500ft and at 3,000ft, control was lost & the order to bale out followed. Two crew members managed to get clear before it hit the ground & burst into flames. Air Gunner Henry Peter Gordon Harbour and three crew members were killed.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 28th November 1943, Vickers Wellington III, X3923, took off from RAF Upper Heyford for on a training mission, during which it collided with another Wellington. Debris from the 2 machines was scattered in the area of Baynard's Green on the north east side of the airfield.

Navigator George Alfred Harding Stevens DFC lost his life in X3923.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Mabel Murray served as a Staff Nurse at the 3rd Southern General Hospital and died in Oxford on the 2nd November 1918 at the age of 35 of pneumonia following influenza.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 5th March 1945, Avro Lancaster III PB475 took off at 17:33 hours from RAF Little Staughton, Bedfordshire. Their mission was to Chemnitz as part of the continuation of Operation Thunderclap. 760 aircraft were involved and severe icing conditions over home bases cost 9 aircraft, especially from 426 Sqn. A further 22 aircraft were lost on the operation. The centre and south of the city were badly damaged by fire and several important factories were destroyed, including the Siegmar tank engine plant.

It was returning from the raid when a hung up target indicator ignited in the bomb bay . Records state it came down near Bellingdon, 2 miles north-west of Chesham, Buckinghamshire at 01:00 hours, sadly six of the crew were killed with only the rear gunner survived by bailing out:

Flying Officer J.C.Gould - KIA
Sgt A. Denbigh - KIA
Flt Sgt R.F.Barnett RAAF - KIA
W/O G.Torr RAAF - KIA
W/O E.W. Hemsworth RAAF - KIA
Sgt G.J.P.Ralph - KIA
Sgt Bill Hart - tail gunner, thrown clear of wreckage, survived
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr


Navigator Keith Stanley Franz Allen of Dulwich Hill, New South Wales, Australia, boarded Vickers Wellington III BJ909 at RAF Bruntingthorpe, Leicestershire, on the 5th January 1945 for a training flight.

His aircraft crashed while attempting to land back at the airfield, killing him and 4 other crew members.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator / Air Gunner Richard Ludgvan Staples was on board Avro Lancaster III JB125 when it crashed in poor visibility at Hoveringham, near Newark-on-Trent, on the 12th Janaury 1945 when on a training flight.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wing Commander Gerard Arthur Lewin Sinclair-Hill OBE was a passenger in Percival Proctor III HM324, when it crashed near Hargatewall, Buxton, on the 5th March 1945.

The crash occurred while the aircraft was flying in low cloud and records state that the pilot may have been attempting to break through the cloud trying to pinpoint his position when the aircraft struck the top of a hill, the wreck was not discovered for 24 hours due to the poor weather. The aircraft was based at RAF Hendon in North London, though its destination on the day the crash is unknown.
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CWGC Oxford (Botley) Cemetery- Oxford, Oxfordshire, Saturday 20th June 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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SuffolkBlue
Posts: 1258
Joined: Sun 31 Aug 2008, 7:31 pm
Location: Bury St. Edmunds

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 28/07/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

CWGC Greenwich Cemetery contains 561 First World War burials. More than half of these graves are scattered throughout the cemetery, but 263 form a large war graves plot known as 'Heroes' Corner'. Here, two curved screen walls bear the names of casualties buried both in the plot and in unmarked graves in the cemetery.

The Second World War plot adjoins and contains 75 graves. An additional screen wall commemorates casualties buried in this plot and ten others buried in unmarked graves elsewhere in the cemetery. In all, the cemetery contains 124 Second World War burials, 3 of which are unidentified British soldiers.

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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

U/T Pilot Albert George Frederick Moye was killed on the 12th September 1941 whilst flying in Airspeed Oxford I, V3980 of No 15 SFTS, when it collided with de Havilland Tiger Moth, T6432 of No 6 EFTS near Sywell.
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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Section E contains a plot of 30 Norwegian service graves from the Second World War.
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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Greenwich Cemetery - Shooter's Hill, London, Sunday 9th August 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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SuffolkBlue
Posts: 1258
Joined: Sun 31 Aug 2008, 7:31 pm
Location: Bury St. Edmunds

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 13/08/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

RAF East Wretham, near Thetford, Norfolk, was hurriedly brought into service during the early years of World War II as a satellite airfield with No. 311 (Czech) Squadron dispersed there from RAF Honington on the 29th July 1940. The squadron operated their bombers from the airfield until April 1942 when it transferred to Coastal Command. Later, RAF Bomber Command No. 115 Squadron RAF, operating Vickers Wellington Mk IIIs and later Avro Lancasters, occupied the airfield from November 1942.

A plan to turn East Wretham into a "Class A" airfield was not carried through, the bomber unit moved to Little Snoring and the station turned over to the USAAF for fighter operations.

Initially after the war ended, the field was used by the RAF as a Polish resettlement camp. With the refugees resettled by 1946, East Wretham was closed as an active airfield and became part of the British Army's Stanford Practical Training Area (also known as STANTA). This huge training area in Norfolk has facilities for the live firing of artillery, mortars, anti-tank and machine guns as well as for dry training and bivouacking. Tanks are used during restricted periods from July to September. There are also facilities for parachuting, air-to-ground attacks and other training involving aircraft.

Many of the original World War II airfield buildings still stand, including one of the T2 hangars.

Land in the villages CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard was set aside for the Czech airmen who lost their lives serving from the nearby airfield.

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Private Mieczyslaw Sieprawski of the Polish Resettlement Corps died on the 23rd October 1946. He was buried at the time in West Tofts (St. Mary) Churchyard, which is now in the Stanford Training Area and cannot be visited.
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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The all Czech crew of Vickers Wellington IC P9299 boarded their aircraft at RAF East Wretham for a daytime cross-country exercise on the 6th April 1942.
Flying low in bad weather, they entered a valley and suddenly confronted by rising ground. Unable to climb or turn to safety, the aircraft crashed on Bryn Uchat, near Llanymawddwy.
All 5 of the crew were killed.
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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 25th May 1941, Vickers Wellington IA N3010 crashed near RAF Langham, Norfolk, after it climbed erratically and stalled, bursting into flames on impact. The 4 crew members all lost their lives in the crash.
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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Ground crew member Jan Bambusek was killed on the 4th Aprl 1942 in a motorcycle crash resulting from a bomb explosion in the immediate vicinity.
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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The crew 311 (Czechoslovak) Squadron boarded their Vickers Wellington I, Z1147, at RAF East Wretham on the 3rd March 1942 for a raid on Emden.

During the mission, they were attacked by Oberfeldwebel Paul Gildner from II/NJG2 who was repelled twice, but during the third attack, Air Gunner Frantisek Binder was seriously wounded in the stomach and head. He died on the return leg and the aircraft made a safe return to East Wretham.
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CWGC East Wretham (St. Ethelbert) Churchyard - Wretham, Norfolk,Tuesday 15th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr


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SuffolkBlue
Posts: 1258
Joined: Sun 31 Aug 2008, 7:31 pm
Location: Bury St. Edmunds

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 22/09/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

RAF Bircham Newton is a former Royal Air Force station around 10 miles east of Kings Lynn. The site was first used during the First World War and received the largest British bomber of the time, the Handley Page V/1500. They would have carried out bombing missions against Berlin but the Armistice was arranged before any missions were actually flown. The airfield was equipped with one aircraft repair shed and three double bay general service sheds, although these had been demolished by 1937. It had two Belfast hangars, three C Type hangars, three Bellman hangars and ten Blister hangars.

It operated through the Second World War as part of No. 16 Group RAF as part of Coastal Command. No. 206 Squadron RAF was one of the squadrons being based there, on maritime patrol duties. Two satellite airfields, RAF Docking and RAF Langham were opened to accommodate units. In 1965 the airfield was used for evaluation trials of the Hawker Siddeley Kestrel V/STOL aircraft.

After closure as an operational airfield in 1966, the airfield became the home of the Construction Industry Training Board. The area of the airfield once occupied by the grass runways has disappeared under the activities of construction equipment, but the majority of buildings on the site remain in use by the CITB. The control tower was demolished in 2010 due to its poor condition.

The church and churchyard in the nearby villiage of Great Bircham are part of the Royal Estate at Sandringham. During the Second World War, the churchyard was used for the burial of airmen from RAF Bircham Newton, service dead whose bodies were washed up by the sea and German airmen brought down.. A special plot in the South-Eastern corner was set aside soon after the outbreak of war, primarily for men from the RAF station, but all save one of the war graves are in this war Graves Plot.

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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

German war grave plot
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Heinrich Kascher was an air gunner crew member on a Dornier Do 17Z-3 bomber from No 6 Staffel (Squadron) of Kampfgeschwader (Bomber Group) 3. His aircraft was attacked and shot down over Burnham Market, crashing in to the sea off Scolt Head, Brancaster Roads, at 12.35hrs on the 21st August 1940. The 3 Spitfires of No 611 Sqn RAF were flown by Pilot Officer's Watkins, J.W. Lund and M.P. Brown from RAF Digby.

The crew of 4 of the Dornier were killed. Heinrich Kaschers' body was washed ashore at Brancaster on the 23rd August 1940, which is the date that appears on his headstone.

The other 3 crew members were also found. Pilot Oberfw. W.Stolle and Observer Lt.H.Krüger were washed ashore and buried at Catton Churchyard in Norwich,and Oberfw. E.Kotulla was recovered from the Sea and buried in Holy Trinity Churchyard at West Runton.

After the War, all three were reburied at the Soldatenfriedhof German War Cemetery at Cannock Chase, Staffs. leaving only Heinrich Kaschner buried close to the site of the crash.

This German aircraft was one of a formation of three raiders which attacked East Anglia that day. The other two raiders escaped this engagement but were attacked near Mablethorpe in Lincolnshire by a section of 3 spitfires (led by S/L McComb) also from 611 Sqn. During these two engagements 4 of the Spitfires were damaged by enemy fire, although not fatally. The two German aircraft collided and crashed into the sea.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Unteroffizier Karl Lessmöllman was a crew member on Junkers Ju 88A-5 F6+BM that was shot down into the sea off Skegness at 10.13hrs on the 8th March 1941, by Spitfires of No 266 Sqn, RAF Wittering. The date on his headstone, 27th April 1941, is presumed to be that on which his body was recovered from the Sea. The pilot of Spitfire X4954 flown by Flying Officer Frederick Ferris, aged 27, was shot down and killed during this engagement.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Unteroffizier Helmut Seidel was a crew member of Heinkel He 111H-3 bomber V4+HK of 2/KG when it was shot down into the sea one and a half miles off Ingoldmells Point, near Skegness, at 10.00hrs on the 15th March 1941, by Bristol Beaufighter R2250 of No 29 Sqn RAF, flow by Guy Gibson DFC and Sgt R.H. James. The crew of 3 were all killed.

The date on Helmut Seidels' headstone, 2nd June 1941, is that on which his body was washed ashore.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Oberleutnant Gunther Trukenbrodt, Unteroffizier Walther Horst & Unteroffizier Paul Weber were all crew members of Heinkel He 111H-5 5J+FS, based at Leeuwarden, Holland, when their aircraft was attacked and damaged by Beaufighter R2157 of No 25 Sqn over the Wash in the early hours of the 5th June 1941, by Beaufighter R2157 of No 25 Sqn. They baled out over the sea and but drowned.

The body of Fw Heuser, the 4th crew member to bail out, was never recovered.

Their damaged aircraft was successfully belly-landed by its pilot Oberleutnant Pass at South Reston, Alford, Lincs, at 02.00hrs, just missing a pond near the village in the process.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Unteroffizier Jakob Ried was the radio operator on Junkers Ju 88C-4 R4+AM) of 4/NJG2 when it was shot down over Wingland Marsh, near King's Lynn, at 01.00hrs on the 14th June 1941, by Bristol Beaufighter R2157 of 25 Sqn. He baled out, but his parachute failed to open and his body was not recovered until the 7th July 1941, which is the date inscribed on his headstone.

A fellow crew member (Fw H. Schulz) was killed when the aircraft crashed on the mud flats 2 miles out from the sea bank and is buried in the Churchyard at Sutton Bridge, Lincs. The body of the 3rd crew member, Uffz. H.Bähner was never found.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Heinkel He 111H-5, F8+BS, of 8/KG40, which was shot down into the sea off Wells-next-Sea, Norfolk at 22.05hrs on the 22nd August 1941 by Bristol Beaufighter of No 604 Sqn. crewed by Wing Commander J. "Cats Eyes" Cunningham DSO, DFC & Bar and Pilot Officer C.F. Rawnsley DFC, DFM & Bar. The body of Gefrieter Rudolf Faath was washed ashore at Burnham Ovary on the 31st August 1941. The bodies of the other 3 crew members (G.Dohmen, H.Hädrich, and K.Dändel) were never found.

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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Handley Page Hampden I, X3147, took off from RAF Hemswell, Lincolnshire on the 1st March 1941 for a raid on Köln. On returning, the aircraft crashed at 04:14hrs at Syderstone, Norfolk and burst into flames.

Wireless Operator / Air Gunner Henry George Loates and his 3 crew members were all killed.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On New Years Day 1941, Henry Edward Middleton Featherstone and George Alexander Meridew were 2 of 7 crew members on board Lockheed Hudson I T9287 that took off from RAF Bircham Newton on a transit flight. While low flying, the port wing clipped a barn and the aircraft came down near Langham, Norfolk. All on board were killed.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Norman Alfred Sadler was born on the 30th July 1914 in Edmonton, Middlesex and was employed as a Clerical Officer in HM Office of Works before joining the RAFVR in August 1939 as an Airman u/t Observer.

Called up on the 1st September 1939, he completed his training, was commissioned and arrived at No. 1 (Coastal) OTU in late July 1940. After training on Bristol Blenheims he was posted to 235 Squadron on the 14th August.

On the 16th December 1940, he was a member of the crew of Bristol Blenheim Z5754 on a minelaying escort operation. Sadler, P/O J Coggins and Sgt. PR Prosser were all lost when the aircraft crashed into the sea off Titchwell, Norfolk, cause unknown.

Only Sadler's body was recovered.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Taking off from RAF Watton, Norfolk, the crew of Bristol Blenheim IV, T2229, were tasked with bombing Ehrang but there were believed to have bombed a target near Koblenz, on the 28th October 1940.

On their return to Norfolk, their aircraft crashed at Cranmer Hall near Sculthorpe. Pilot Ian Prosser, Observer Arthur Fraser Dallas and Sergeant Jack Hardcastle were all killed, with Hardcastle buried in his home city of Leeds.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 5th August 1940, Lockheed Hudson I P5133 took off from RAF Bircham Newton for an air-sea rescue operation. On return to base at 18:00hrs, the aircraft stalled and crashed at Ringers Farm, Syderstone, around 5 miles from Bircham Newton.

Pilot Robin Rustom and three crew members were all killed.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Oberfeldwebel Emil Rödel was a crew member on the floatplane Heinkel He 115, S4+BL, of 3 Staffel (Squadron) of Kustenfliegergruppe (Maritime Group) 506. The aircraft hit a chain low radio mast at West Beckham, Norfolk, and narrowly missed the Sheringham Gas holder, before crashing onto the beach at Sheringham, Norfolk, at 03.15hrs on the 6th Dec 1939.

The crew of 3 were all killed.

A contemporary newspaper account, and 3 photographs, of this incident can still be seen in the bar of a Sheringham public house “The Two Lifeboats”.

Emil Rödel was buried, in an unused corner of the Churchyard with full military honours, including a RAF bearer party, on the 9th December 1939. The coffin was draped in 2 swastika flags and there was a large wreath inscribed, "A tribute to a gallant airman from the officers, NCO’s and airmen of the RAF".

The bodies of the other two crew members (W.Wodtke & K.Ullman) were washed ashore later in the month and given full military funerals at Sheringham. After the War the remains of these two Airmen were reburied at the German War Cemetery at Cannock Chase.

When British experts examined the Heinkel, it was found to have self-sealing fuel tanks. The British scientists had been working for several years to perfect a rubber material to line fuel tanks, so that in the event of a puncture by a bullet the aircraft would not leak fuel and catch fire. It is said that the capture of this aircraft enabled them to solve the problems.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Anthony Barrington Giles was killed whilst flying in Lockheed Hudson V, AE647 of No 500 Sqn, when it crashed on the beach at Brancaster, Norfolk, on the night of the 17th February 1942.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 8th June 1941, the crew of Bristol Blenheim IVF V5689 took off from RAF Bircham Newton to provide air experience to two new ground staff officers.

Flying in mist, the aircraft crashed at Holmes-next-the-Sea on the north Norfolk coast.

Pilot Frederick William Hall-Jones and all on board were killed.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 15th May 1942, two formations of Lockheed Hudsons left RAF Bircham Newton detailed to carry out a strike on enemy shipping, previously spotted by a Beaufighter off Terschelling at 18:15hrs.

Lockheed Hudson AM906 'O' from 407 Squadron, was badly damaged during the attack with both engines being partially damaged. The pilot brought aircraft to base but before landing could be made, both engines failed completely and the Hudson crash-landed. The Observer, Angus Kippen, was killed and the wireless operator and air-gunner badly hurt.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator / Air Gunner Raeside Harley Brown lost his life on the 28th February 1942 whilst flying in Vickers Wellington, Z8702, of the CCDU, which was lost on a patrol off the Dutch coast
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Avro Lancaster I R5558 from RAF Woodhall Spa, Lincolnshire, crashed into the sea four miles off Wells, Norfolk, on the 14th July 1942 while flying at 300 feet in low cloud.

The Wells lifeboat "Royal Silver Jubilee 1910 - 1935" was launched shortly after 06:15hrs on receiving a report of the downed aircraft, under the command of Coxswain Theodor Neilson. The still floating fuselage of the Lancaster was found, together with one seriously injured crew member (Fg Off Davies) clinging to the wing. Coxswain Theodor Neilson boarded the remains of the fuselage to search for possible survivors, even though there was a considerable risk of the aircraft sinking. Finding no-one in the fuselage, the lifeboat returned to Wells and Fg Off Davies was taken to Wells hospital where he unfortunately died shortly afterwards. The Lifeboat returned to search for the rest of the 7 crew and recovered the bodies of Fg Off Blease and Flt Sgt. McPhee. The other 4 crew members were never found, and are remembered on the RAF memorial at Runnymede. John Blease was buried on the 18th July 1942 in joint funeral with his 2 fellow crew members.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 11th June 1943, Vickers Wellington X MS486 took off from RAF Leconfield for a mission to Düsseldorf. 783 aircraft took part with 38 losses (4.9%). PFF marking was accurate but one Mosquito inadvertently released some target indicators far from the target, confusing the main force and causing many bombs to fall in open countryside. Nevertheless, much damage was caused to the centre of Düsseldorf.

One engine on MS486 was disabled by anti-aircraft fire and with the other overheating, the aircraft was forced to jettison its single 4,000-lb bomb and turn for home. The pilot was preparing to make an emergency landing at RAF Docking when the runway lights went out. He tried to go round again, but the plane crashed at Stanhoe and caught fire.

Two of the crew were killed and three others survived. The pilot, F/O FW Jackson, is buried at New Hunstanton Cemetery. The navigator, F/O Ronald Lea, is buried here at Great Bircham.

The rear gunner, Sgt Ivor Prothero, survived severe burns and later wrote a detailed account of the events of that night, including how ARP warden Charlie Seaman was the first civilian on the scene and received a commendation for bravery.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Handley Page Halifax II W7929 took off from RAF Linton-on-Ouse at 23:52 hours on the night of 30th/1st May 1943, detailed to bomb Essen, Germany. The aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire and on reaching the East Anglian coast, W7929 crashed at 04:47 hours while attempting to make an emergency landing at RAF Docking, Norfolk. Five of the crew were killed and two were injured. The pilot had reported that two engines were unserviceable.

The crew members of W7929 were:

Sergeant R Davies (645244) (RAF) Injured
Sergeant Herbert Mason (1380052) (RAFVR)
Sergeant William Oldroyd (1124471) (RAFVR) (Rear Gunner)
Sergeant Ronald James Pike (657492) (RAFVR)
Sergeant J Rashbrook (2206682) (RAF) Injured
Flight Sergeant James Chadd Rudd (416288) (Pilot)
Sergeant Ernest John Wilson (546293) (RAF)

Flight Sergeant James Chadd Rudd DFM Citation:

On his first solo operation, this Non-Commissioned Officer was Captain and pilot of a Halifax aircraft detailed to attack Stettin on the night of 21st April 1943. When flying at 500 feet at a distance of 220 miles from his target, the starboard inner engine was badly damaged by flak and had to be feathered. Sergeant Rudd carried on, climbing from 500 to 12,000 feet and delivering a successful attack from this height. On returning to base, he carried out a successful landing under conditions of poor visibility. It is considered that this comparatively inexperienced pilot showed great devotion to duty and set a shining example, both to his own and other crews at this Station. He is recommended for the immediate award of the DFM. (LG 14/5/1943) Remarks by Station Commander: This NCO undoubtedly showed tenacity of purpose to a high degree. His determination to carry out the task allotted to him in spite of the possibility of further failure and the heightened of being shot down by enemy fighters because of his inability to keep in the main stream indicates marked courage and resolution, especially as this was his first operational sortie. The recommendation of the Squadron Commander is therefore strongly endorsed. Remarks by Air Officer Commanding: I strongly recommend that the determination and courage shown by this young Captain be recognised by the immediate award of the DFM.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Pilot Jack Rhodes lost his life on the 1st March 1945 when his Avro Lancaster I NG184 crashed into the sea off the Norfolk coast when returning to RAF Scampton from a mission to Mannheim.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

19 year old Flight Engineer Kenneth Leonard Wallace lost his life on board Short Stirling III EH960 when his aircraft crashed into the Wash due to excessive vibrations, leading to loss of control, on the 17th October 1943. The air test, from RAF Witchford, also claimed the lives of 6 crew members.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The crew of Handley Page Hampden, AE435 of No. 145 RCAF Coastal Command, took off from RAF Docking for an operation against German shipping off Iymuiden, Holland, on the 18th February 1943. It immediately crashed into Dorking railway station, killing the crew members who are buried together here. The area was evacuated as the unexploded torpedo was still on board.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 9th May 1939, Avro Anson I, K6210, of 220 Squadron, was involved in a collision with another 220 Squadron Avro Anson, K6225, at RAF Bircham Newton. The crews were performing a training flight with four other Avro Ansons. At the end of the exercise and when returning to base, the propeller blades of Anson K6225 hit the tail of K6210. Out of control, K6210 went into a spin and crashed in a field near the airfield

Sgt Robert Norman Riddell (aged 23) killed
Sgt David Peacock (aged 26) killed
Corporal Charles Samson (aged 38) killed

The occupants of the K6225 were not injured and the aircraft was only slightly damaged.
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CWGC Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard - Great Bircham, Norfolk, Sunday 20th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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SuffolkBlue
Posts: 1258
Joined: Sun 31 Aug 2008, 7:31 pm
Location: Bury St. Edmunds

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 22/09/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

I had been meaning to visit the 2 CWGC sites at Cannock Chase for a while and although I didn't get as much time there as I would have liked (I will head back there again at some point as a result), I made the small detour off the M6 recently to head over.

During the First World War when there was a large military camp at Cannock Chase which became the base for the New Zealand Rifle Brigade. There was also a prisoner-of-war hospital with 1,000 beds, and both camp and hospital used the burial ground.

CWGC Cannock Chase War Cemetery contains 97 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, most of them New Zealanders, and 286 German burials. There are also three burials of the Second World War. The 58 German burials in Plot 4 were all brought into the cemetery in 1963, as part of the German Government's policy to remove all graves situated in cemeteries or war graves plots not maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

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CWGC Cannock Chase War Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cannock Chase War Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cannock Chase War Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cannock Chase War Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

ImageCWGC Cannock Chase War Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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SuffolkBlue
Posts: 1258
Joined: Sun 31 Aug 2008, 7:31 pm
Location: Bury St. Edmunds

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 24/09/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

A 5 minute walk away is the CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery, which contains nearly 5,000 burials from both the First and Second World War. The burials are mainly German and Austrian nationals with a very small number of Ukrainians.

On the 16th October 1959, the governments of the United Kingdom and the Federal Republic of Germany made an agreement about the future care of the remains of German military personnel and German civilian internees of both world wars who at the time were interred in various cemeteries not already maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. It was agreed that the remains would be transferred to a single central cemetery established on Cannock Chase for this purpose.

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The German War Graves Commission (Volksbund Deutsche Kriegsgräberfürsorge or "VDK") made the necessary arrangements and the inauguration and dedication of this cemetery, which is maintained under the inter-government agreement by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission - took place in June 1967. I

The entrance building contains visiting room where the cemetery register is available on request. A plan of the plots within the cemetery is also on display. From here a small courtyard with a covered passage forms the connection to the Hall of Honour, which has at its centre, resting on a large block of stone, a bronze sculpture of a fallen warrior, by the German sculptor Professor Hans Wimmer.

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the west-facing terrace there is a granite monument to the crews of the four airships (SL 11, L32, L31, L48) shot down in World War I and who lie buried here in a tomb.

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the afternoon of the 2nd September 1916, sixteen airships, twelve from the German Naval Airship Division and four from the Army Division, set out for England on what was to be the biggest air raid of the war. For the first time the two services were combining. The vessels were carrying a total load of 32 tons of bombs. The 'Leader of Airships,' Fregattenkpitan Peter Strasser, was still determined that his airships would bring England to her knees.

Among the army airships was one from the Schtte-Lanz factories at Leipzig. The SL11 was the most recent addition to the fleet having entered into service on the 12th August 1916. It had set off on the raid of 31st August, but had been turned back by bad weather. On 2nd September it would complete the journey to London for the first, and last, time.

In command of SL11 was Hauptmann Wilhelm Schramm, an experienced airship captain who knew the area he was to bomb better than most of his colleagues. He had been born at Old Charlton, Kent, and lived in England until the age of 15 when on the death of his father, the London representative of the Siemens electrical firm, he returned to Germany and joined the army. He was given his first command in December 1915. Schramm had an experienced crew flying with him that night who had already served with him on several raids in the Zeppelin airship LZ39. They totalled only 16 men, machinists, gunners, 'elevator' man and 'bomb' man, officers and Captain.

At approximately 23.00 hours the Home Defence squadrons were put on alert. Radio messages from the airships had been intercepted, and a welcoming party was prepared. Ten aircraft were sent up that night. First away was BE2c 2963, her pilot having first personally supervised the pre-flight checks. The fog was thick and getting worse, but Robinson was convinced it would be clearer higher up. He had three drums of Brock and Pommeroy ammunition, and just enough fuel to keep him aloft for three and a half hours. He took off safely and disappeared into the mist.


Schramm approached London from the North, passing over Royston and Hitchin. Consequently he was not the first to arrive over the capital. LZ98 under Hauptmann Ernst Lehmann had that distinction, and by 01.00 hours was heavily engaged by the guns of the Dartford and Tilbury defences. Dropping his bombs over what he took to be the London docks, Lehmann took his ship up to 13,000 feet. Suddenly an aircraft was spotted approaching the airship. Robinson had seen the Zeppelin caught in the beam of search lights, and had slowly climbed up to meet it. The experienced Lehmann, with a much lighter ship now that his bombs were gone, promptly headed for cloud and continued to ascend. He soon outstripped the night pilot and disappeared. Robinson no doubt cursed his luck. He had already been in the air for two hours, and had only one and a half hours flying time left.

Half an hour later SL11 was wreaking destruction over North London. The Finsbury and Victoria Park searchlights caught her over Alexandra Palace, and the Finsbury gunners filled the air around the ship with explosives. Schramm turned his craft and headed for Walthamstow trying to dodge the fingers of light. Hundreds of people watched, but no matter how close they burst, the ground defence's shells seemed to have no effect. The spectators that night however were treated to a sight that was completely new to their experience. The crowds fell silent. An aircraft, running a gauntlet of shell fire, was fast approaching.

Robinson had given up searching for LZ39, and attracted by the commotion over Ponder's End and Enfield Highway, headed for what he presumed must be another airship. The shell fire grew intense as he neared SL11, and might very well have put an end to his attack before he had got within range. Remembering how LZ39 had so easily outdistanced him as he tried to gain height, Robinson this time headed straight for the airship. The watching crowd below swelled as the news spread that a pilot was within striking distance of the hated 'Zepp'. Suddenly the firing stopped, the searchlights swung frantically, and to cries of despair and frustration from the crowd, the airship found cloud cover and disappeared from sight.

The silence lasted a few moments only. As suddenly as it had vanished, the airship reappeared. Every gun roared and the night sky came alive with explosions. The aircraft was rocked by the blasts, but closed in on the airship.

Robinson had his first drum of Brock and Pommeroy ready, and as he flew alongside the airship he riddled its entire length with bullets. He turned his tiny aeroplane around and viewed the Schtte-Lanz. The airship appeared to be completely unaffected by the attack. Robinson fitted his second drum and raked the length of the vessel a second time. Still there was no result. It seemed the massive craft was impregnable. It sailed on almost majestically, as though studiously ignoring the puny aircraft circling below it. To the thousands of spectators it seemed as though a midge was fluttering around a lamp, vainly beating its wings against a glowing bulb. Robinson had one drum of ammunition left, and precious little fuel. Now behind and slightly below the airship, he changed tactics. He dived at the thin end of the craft, heading for the twin rudders above and below the pair of elevators, any one of which was larger than his entire machine. His last drum of ammunition was poured into that one area. Now the guns of the ground defences were silent and all eyes were fixed on the airship, glowing in the searchlights' powerful beams. They had no idea what the pilot was doing. They knew nothing of new incendiary bullets. They did not realise that. as they watched a stream of explosive was pouring into the smallest section of the airship, ripping through its cotton skin. The first indication to them, to the pilot, and probably to the airship's crew themselves, that the longed for victory was at hand, was a dull pink glow from within the rear portion of the ship. Within seconds the tail section was alight, and flames over 100 feet long shot out into the night sky. Almost in an instant the entire hull of the airship seemed to be in flames. Thousands .of cubic feet of hydrogen ignited with a brilliance which lit the sky, turning night into day. The spectators were dazzled. The searchlights were suddenly unnecessary. Observers in Reigate reported seeing the explosion. It was 2.30 in the morning on Sunday 3 September, and 12,500 feet above London a German airship, while in the very act of bombing the capital, had been attacked and completely destroyed.

For thousands of people it was without doubt one of the most memorable events of the entire war. It is difficult to imagine one man achieving anything more spectacular. The blazing wreckage of SL11 slowly fell to earth in a field in Cuffley, Hertfordshire. Before it reached the ground London was celebrating in boistrous fashion. Oblivious to the fact that other enemy airships were overhead, the city erupted in a frenzy of rejoicing. There was singing and dancing in the streets, small boys paraded up and down while their parents hugged one another or burst into patriotic song. Factory hooters and engine whistles added to the din. The excitement was to last for days. Long before dawn hundreds of sightseers set out for Cuffley to view the wreckage.

While London rejoiced, Robinson turned for home. With fuel tanks almost empty he landed at Sutton's Farm at 02.45 hours after a gruelling patrol of three and a half hours. Met by the excited ground crews who milled around the aircraft, Robinson had only to answer a brief affirmative to the question on every man's lips. With a cheer he was borne shoulder high in triumph from his aircraft to the office. Though exhausted and numb with cold Robinson was ordered to write a report immediately.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The German Zeppelin L.32 (production designation of "LZ-74") first flew on the 4th August 1916 and was formally commissioned a short time later on the 7th August.Her war record included a total of eleven missions, with three air raids against Britain. She dropped a total of 15,124lbs of ordnance during her service life.

Her end came on the night of 24th September 1916 when she fell to a British BE.2c of 39 Home Defence Squadron near Great Burstead, Essex, after having been engaged by ground-based anti-aircraft fire. The resulting crash killed her entire crew. L.33 was lost in the same raid and marked a rethinking of strategy concerning bomber Zeppelins for the Germans.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

German Naval Airship Service Zeppelin L31 was commanded by Kapitanleutnant Heinrich Mathy, a renowned veteran of numerous raids over Great Britain. On the 1st October 1916, Mathy commanded the L31 on its final mission - an attempted bombing raid on London. During this operation his airship was attacked by 2nd Lieutenant Wulfstan Tempest in a BE2c.

Tempest succeeded in igniting the gas in the airship, which crashed in flames at Hadley Wood, near Potters Bar, Hertfordshire. The death of Mathy emphasised the growing efficiency of British air-defences and marked an end to German attempts to attack London with airships.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 17th June 1917, the Germans dispatched two Zeppelins which were able to fly at altitudes of 13,000ft - way beyond the 8,000ft flight ceiling of English fighter aircraft.

One Zeppelin, L42, crossed the Kent coast at Ramsgate and released its bombs, but L48 endured heavy winds over the Orford Ness coast, Suffolk. Its compasses froze and it developed engine problems.
The airship dropped a few bombs over Martlesham and Wickham Market before drifting over Saxmundham and Leiston. There it was forced to descend to a height that put it in range of Royal Flying Corps fighters. It was crippled by the gunfire in a descent lasting seven minutes as it became engulfed in flames, crashing in a cornfield between Theberton and Eastbridge. Of the 18 crew there were just three survivors.

The dead were laid to rest in the village churchyard before being moved here to Cannock Chase.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The other terrace forms a link between the Hall of Honour and the cemetery. The graves of the dead of the First and Second World War are generally separated and lie on either side of the gentle slopes of the cemetery with a valley between them. The burials are marked by headstones from Belgian Petit Granit and are usually inscribed for two individuals on the front and on the back.

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the night of the 25th / 26th April 1942, while on a bombing raid over Bath, the pilot of Dornier Do 217E-4 Werk # 1120 "F8 + EM" was reportedly dazzled by the searchlight of a Pentridge Hill (Dorset) regiment and crashed at Bottlebush Down, Handley Cross, Dorset at 05:05 hours.

The crew were subsequently buried nearby but have since been moved to Cannock Chase.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Dornier Do 17Z-3 2682 "7T + LL" struck balloon cables on a bombing mission and crashed at Nantglyn, near Denbighshire, Wales, on the 16th October 1940. All of the German crew were killed.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the night of 1st November 1941, Heinkel He-111 from the 7th Staffel Kampfgeschwader 40 was on a bombing mission over northern England when it was intercepted by a Bristol Beaufighter from RAF Valley, flown by pilot officer M.Shipard and Sgt. D.Oxby. The Heinkel was shot down over Anglesey, with the stricken bombercoming down near Bwlch-y-fen, nr Gwalchmai.

All were lost in the crash and sadly due to the total destruction of the plane the pilots body was never found, with the others now rest here at Cannock Chase.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Gotha G.V 938/16 from BG 3/Bs 14, crewed by Ltn Friedrich von Thomsen, Uffz Karl Ziegler and Uffz Walter Heiden, was shot down on the 28th January 1918.
After bombing Hampstead at 21:45 hours, it was attacked and came down at Frund's Farm, near Wickford, at 22:10 hrs.The attackers were two Sopwith Camels from No 44 Sqn RFC; Lt C C Banks in B3827 and Capt G H Hackwill in B2402. The three Gotha crew members were killed.

Lt Banks and Capt Hackwill were both awarded the MC.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Bf 110C-4 2123 "3M + CH" was shot down on the 25th August 1940 during aerial combat over Winfrith, East Chaldon, near Warmwell. Lt Karl Westphal and his gunner Uffz Josef Brief were the victims of F/O Darley & Tobin of 609 Sq.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

ImageCWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Dornier Do 17Z-3 was shot down on the 16th August, 1940 by three Hawker Hurricanes while on a mission in the Canterbury area. The aircraft exploded with the remains falling on the beach at Whitstable, Kent. The four deceased crew members are buried in a collective grave here.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Messerschmitt Me 410A was shot down in combat by S/Ldr Caldwell and F/O Rawling in a de Havilland Mosquito of No.96 Squadron on the 23rd February 1944. This was one of four aircraft, which was flying about 23,000 ft. on a north west course for London when it was attacked by a night-fighter and set on fire. The aircraft went into a steep dive and exploded on impact with the ground at Bentley Farm, Framfield near Uckfield, Sussex, with wreckage was scattered over a wide area and only fragments of papers were found.

Extract from Sussex Police Report Ref. CA.3/44/81

This plane was attacked by a night fighter and was seen falling in flames. When it crashed, the bombs on board exploded, throwing portions of wreckage and pieces of the bodies of the airmen nearly 300 yards away. Only small portions of bodies were found (Sufficient to fill a sack quarter full). A military Medical Officer examined the hands and feet which were found and said without question they were from two different bodies. Also portions of two mens identity cards were found. The two occupants were – Uffz. Reinhard Eggers and Ogfr. Stefan Bednorz.

F/Lt Hunt, Tangmere, conducted an enquiry and gave me the information regarding the identity of the plane and occupants. The Home Guard established a guard on the plane until they were relieved by the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders of Canada.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Junkers Ju 88 A-1, 886116, L1+EP, crashed into the sea near Dungeness on the 4th October 1940. The body of Gefreiter Peter Schoffmann was washed ashore at Dover on the 18th November 1940.
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CWGC Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery - Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, Monday 7th September 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr
Last edited by SuffolkBlue on Thu 24 Sep 2020, 10:27 am, edited 2 times in total.

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SuffolkBlue
Posts: 1258
Joined: Sun 31 Aug 2008, 7:31 pm
Location: Bury St. Edmunds

Re: CWGC Cemeteries **updated 24/09/2020**

Post by SuffolkBlue »

The major CWGC sites in North London are some of the last for me to cover that are fairly “local”. With the autumn colours coming through and having the first free Sunday for a while, I planned to visit a number of cemeteries in the area.

The first of two locations in Enfield is the CWGC Enfield Crematorium. 55 casualties of World War Two are commemorated by name on an octagonal memorial of Portland stone in the crematorium grounds. The memorial forms the focal point of a sunken garden of remembrance which is located to the left of the main drive.

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CWGC Enfield Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 26th September 1942, Air Bomber Edward Douglas Morgan, from Enfield, and his two crew members were killed when their Armstrong Whitworth Whitley V AD667 crashed moments after lifting off from the runway at RAF Abingdon on a training mission.
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CWGC Enfield Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Enfield Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

CWGC Enfield (Hertford Road) Cemetery contains war graves of both world wars. There are 22 burials of the First World War comprising 3 sailors of the Royal Navy, one man from the Royal air Force and 17 soldiers from the United Kingdom. The Second World War burials number 50, with around half of these in a plot to the left of the main path. The remainder are scattered throughout the cemetery.

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CWGC Enfield (Hertford Road) Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Handley Page Halifax V LL283 took off from RAF Dishforth for a night navigation exercise on the 31st August 1944.

During the flight, an engine caught fire over North Wales and the flames quickly spreading along the wing. The order to bale out was given but only six were in a position to do so. The aircraft crashed at Llanystumdwy, near Caernarfon.

Flight Engineer Alan William Pack, of Ponders End, Enfield and one other crew member lost their lives,
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CWGC Enfield (Hertford Road) Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 3rd October 1943, Handley Page Halifax II JD276 overshot the runway at RAF Pocklington on return to base after a training mission and whilst going around again, crashed and burst into flames near Heyton, near Market Weighton, Yorkshire.

All of the crew, including Wireless Operator Douglas William Graham Randall, were killed.
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CWGC Enfield (Hertford Road) Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 10th July 1940, the crew of Avro Anson I N5228 were ordered to patrol the skies between Dunkirk and Dieppe but lost control during night take-off from RAF Detling in bad visibility and crashed at Thurnham, south-east of the airfield at 2:35am. (Pilot) Sgt James Wilson, (Obs) Sgt William George Shier, (WOP/AG) Sgt Leo Frederick James O’Kelly, and (AG) Sgt Horace George Worton were all killed.
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CWGC Enfield (Hertford Road) Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

CWGC Edmonton Cemetery contains burials of both wars. Most of the First World War graves are of servicemen who died in the North Middlesex Hospital, then the Edmonton Military Hospital. Nearly all are buried in the war plot behind the chapel.

A small number of the Second World War burials form a separate plot, in the corner of which stands a small stone memorial commemorating six men whose graves could not be marked by headstones.

The cemetery also contains a screen wall bearing the names of 39 casualties buried in Tottenham Park Cemetery whose graves could no longer be maintained.

In all, 167 First World War and 156 Second World War casualties are now commemorated in this cemetery.

Near the First World War plot is a memorial to the victims of the Edmonton Air Disaster which occurred on the 4th September 1938. A Hawker Audax K7381, of No. 1 Elementary and Reserve Flying Training School, based at Hatfield, crashed into a residential area of Edmonton. The aircraft was being flown by a 19-year-old pilot, Sgt Stanley Robert Morris RAFVR.

It is thought that Morris was attempting to land the aircraft at Pymmes Park when it hit the roof of one house, fell into the roadway, and ended up on the roof of two houses on Dunholme Road, setting fire to the properties and killing the pilot and six of the occupants of the two houses. The 29 injured were taken to the North Middlesex Hospital, mostly with burns; 13 were detained in hospital, where five of them subsequently died.

An inquest was held at North Middlesex Hospital on the 7th September 1938, where evidence showed that the pilot was disobeying orders in flying over the area. An instructor at the Flying Training School said that Morris had been told to fly local circuits at Hatfield and should have stayed within three miles of the aerodrome. Edmonton is around 12 miles from Hatfield. The inquest heard that the aircraft had been fit to fly and had been flown by other pilots that day. Morris had also been seen on the same day low-flying contrary to his orders. The coroner returned a verdict of accidental death to all the victims.

The Air Ministry released a report on the accident stating that Morris was operating contrary to orders; not only had he flown further than three miles from the aerodrome, he was also manoeuvring at low level over a built-up area. He appears to have dived from 1,000 ft, flattened out his dive and continued to fly at low level when he lost further height and struck the roof of a house. The investigation could find no evidence of a defect in the engine or aircraft.

Edward and James Letch, brothers who tried to rescue the pilot from the aircraft, died in hospital from burns. They were posthumously awarded the Order of the British Empire.

In 2008 a memorial stone was laid at Dunholme Road Air Disaster Memorial in Church Street Cemetery on the seventieth anniversary of the crash.
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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

HMS Princess Irene was a 5,394 GRT ocean liner which was built in 1914 by William Denny and Brothers Ltd, Dumbarton, Scotland for the Canadian Pacific Railway. She was requisitioned by the Royal Navy on completion and converted to an auxiliary minelayer.

In May 1915, Princess Irene was moored in Saltpan Reach, on the Medway Estuary in Kent between Port Victoria and Sheerness, being loaded with mines in preparation for deployment on a minelaying mission.

At 11:14hrs on the 27th May 1915, Princess Irene exploded and disintegrated. A column of flame 300 feet high was followed a few seconds later by another of similar height and a pall of smoke hung over the spot where Princess Irene had been, reaching to 1,200 feet. Two barges laying alongside her were also destroyed. The explosion was larger than that which had destroyed HMS Bulwark in the Medway six months earlier, although the loss of life was less. A total of 352 people were killed, including 273 officers and men, and 76 dockyard workers who were on board Princess Irene. On the Isle of Grain a girl of nine was killed by flying debris, and a farmhand died of shock. A collier half a mile away had its crane blown off its mountings. A part of one of Princess Irene's boilers landed on the ship and a man working on the ship died from injuries sustained when he was struck by a piece of metal weighing 70 pounds.

Wreckage was flung up to 20 miles away, with people near Sittingbourne being injured by flying debris, some of which landed in Bredhurst. Severed heads were found at Hartlip and on the Isle of Grain. The sole survivor from Princess Irene was a stoker, who suffered severe burns. Three of her crew had a lucky escape as they were ashore at the time.

A Court of Inquiry was held into the loss of Princess Irene. Evidence was given that priming of the mines was being carried out hurriedly and by untrained personnel. A faulty primer was blamed for the explosion. Following the loss of HMS Natal on the 30th December 1915 and HMS Vanguard on the 9th July 1917, both caused by internal explosions, suspicion was raised at the inquiry into the loss of Natal that sabotage was to blame for the loss of all four ships. A worker at Chatham Dockyard was named as a suspect, but a thorough investigation by Special Branch cleared him of any blame.
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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 18th September 1945, Consolidated B-24J Liberator C8, KN736, of 466 (Australian) Squdron, RAAF, crashed at Potton Wood, Potton, near Cockayne Hatley, Bedfordshire.

466 Squadron were based at RAF Bassingbourn in Cambridgeshire, and were learning how to operate the American B-24 as a replacement for their Halifax. A training flight was planned in order to introduce and test the reactions of a mixed British and Australian crew to emergency engine failure conditions. A three-engined takeoff and landing would be followed by another flight when two engines would be stopped.

Around 15:00hrs, the seven crew and a Scottish Terrier puppy climbed back into the refuelled KN736, a brand-new Liberator C8.

The Captain, Flt. Lt. Pat McNulty DFC, RAAF, a veteran of many operational flights in the similar Halifax, was at the controls in the left-hand seat. Under the instruction of Flight Lieutenant John Spiller DFC, RAF, of 59 Squadron from Waterbeach, seconded to 466 Squadron for this training, the flight engineers shut down the starboard outer engine as the wheels left the concrete; the remaining three engines powered the Liberator in her climb in a controlled and safe manner.

Pleased with the success of the crew and plane, Flt. Lt. Spiller decided that the other part of the training, handling the plane with just two operational engines, might as well be performed before ending the flight for the day with the three-engined landing. It was a momentous decision. It is possible Spiller felt under pressure of time. Squadron training had been delayed by bad weather that September, and on this day, the schedule was also running late, so he probably felt it would save time to skip the landing between the two scenarios.

At first, the shut down and feathering of the second, starboard inner engine, went perfectly well, though the effort to maintain straight flight required full left rudder. The aeroplane was losing altitude gradually, and the exercise had started at only 1,200 feet. Any attempt to make a turn to the right would have immediately spun the Liberator into the ground, and the crew discovered there to be insufficient control input remaining to achieve a left turn. Unable to maintain altitude at such a low level, the pilot was flying the plane in an exceptionally risky condition at the limit of control, and as KN736 headed north-west, the land was gently rising towards the Greensand Ridge at Potton; before very long it became essential to restart at least one of the engines.

This was a critical time, as the propeller blades had first to be set to a fine pitch and allowed to 'windmill' to generate the momentum that a starter motor on the ground would have provided; this naturally added drag and slowed the plane significantly at a time when it needed all the speed it could get. The crew performed the tasks required but the engine stubbornly refused to restart, and the plane began to rapidly lose speed and altitude. Unable to turn and with the ground rising to meet them, the crew were suddenly in serious trouble, with very little time left to sort it out. They hurriedly un-feathered the inner starboard engine, again slowing the plane yet more, but all attempts to restart this engine also failed, and fairly quickly, the starboard wing stalled, KN736 went into a dive and crashed into the southern boundary of Potton Wood. The plane broke into sections and burst into flames.

Crew of B-24 KN736:

Captain, Flight Lieutenant Patrick Joseph McNulty, DFC, RAAF 426286, aged 22 - killed

Pilot Instructor: Flight Lieutenant John Edward James Spiller, DFC, RAF 147197, aged 28 - killed

Co-pilot, Flying Officer Francis George "Frank" Doak, RAAF 419770 - survived but badly injured

Flying Officer Noel P. Gilmour, RAAF 428664 - survived but badly injured

Flight Engineer: Flight Sergeant. Roy Delbert Turner, RAF 1863014. aged 20 - killed

Instructing Flight Engineer: Flight Sergeant Raymond Victor Carling, RAF 1803034 - survived but badly injured

Wireless Operator/Air Gunner: Warrant Officer James Raymond "Jim" Potter, RAAF 434008 - killed
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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Bristol Beaufighter TFX NE813 of 132 Operational Training Unit, took off from RAF East Fortune on the 2nd May 1945 at 23:05hrs and last heard calling at 02:14hrs. Fifteen minutes later, while flying at 1300 feet and having veered off track, NE813 flew into high ground at Wester Dod on Slottenclough Farm, Cockburnspath, Berwickshire.

Pilot Harry Kenneth Lillington was buried at Haddington, East Lothian, and his Navigator Aubrey John Clarke here in the Edmonton Cemetery.
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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Edmonton Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

CWGC Tottenham Cemetery contains burials of both wars. Most of the 293 First World War graves are in a plot on the western side of the cemetery, backed by a Screen Wall bearing the names of those buried both there and elsewhere in the cemetery, whose graves could not be individually marked.

There are 212 burials of the Second World War, mostly scattered, but 30 graves form a small plot facing the First World War plot. Again, some graves could not be individually marked and these casualties are commemorated on supplementary panels to the Screen Wall.
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CWGC Tottenham Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Tottenham Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Tottenham Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Tottenham Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Tottenham Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Gunner Albert Henry Berry & Gunner George Brown were killed on the 10th January 1945 when an ordnance they were working on accidentally exploded.
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CWGC Tottenham Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Tottenham Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Tottenham Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Tottenham Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Tottenham Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

In CWGC St Pancras Cemetery, over 100 graves from both wars form a war graves plot. The plot also contains a number of headstones removed from graves scattered elsewhere in the cemetery that could not be maintained. A further memorial bears the names of 27 casualties whose graves could not be marked individually, and six First World War casualties buried in adjacent Islington Cemetery who could not be commemorated there.

There are now 308 First World War commemorations in St Pancras Cemetery, including 1 unidentified sailor of the Royal Navy, and 208 from the Second World War. There are 5 foreign national burials and 2 non-war service burials here.

The forecast of a dry day went pretty much downhill for the 30 minutes, with a downpour happening just as I arrived, so it was a short visit here.

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CWGC St. Pancras Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC St. Pancras Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC St. Pancras Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 27th July 1940, whilst loading bombs onto Fairey Battle L5528 of 150 Sqn at RAF Newton, Nottinghamshire, one of the bombs fell off the aircraft and began to burn. Despite an heroic effort from aircrew and ground crew to put out the flames, the bomb exploded, killing six men from 150 Sqn, with another man killed and one other injured from the airfield.
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CWGC St. Pancras Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC St. Pancras Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC St. Pancras Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC St. Pancras Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC St. Pancras Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Within the same area is CWGC Islington Cemetery, which contains 344 First World War graves and 265 from the Second World War, all scattered throughout the cemetery. A screen wall in the western part bears the names of those whose graves could not be marked individually, together with the names of two casualties from the Second World War whose remains were cremated at Islington Crematorium.

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CWGC Islington Cemetery and Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Islington Cemetery and Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Islington Cemetery and Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Land in CWGC East Finchley Cemetery was set aside in December 1916 for the burial of ex-Officers and men of His Majesty's Forces from the Borough whose deaths resulted from wounds received or disease contracted in the First World War. A number of pre and Second World War casualties are also buried here.
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CWGC East Finchley Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Finchley Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Navigator Arthur Frederick Witt and his pilot took off from RAF Swannington in de Havilland Mosquito NF.30 MV546 on the 26th January 1945 for a night training exercise.
They were recalled due to worsening weather and instructed to use the Mother Approach method but the Mosquito exploded as it dived into the ground near Oulton airfield, Norfolk.

Both he and the pilot, Thomas William Redfern, were killed. The pilots brother was killed in an aircraft accident while serving in the RAF aged 18, in 1938.
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CWGC East Finchley Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Finchley Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Finchley Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Finchley Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Finchley Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Finchley Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC East Finchley Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

CWGC Willesden New Cemetery contains 130 First World War graves and 121 from the Second World War. Most of the graves are scattered, although 29 of the Second World War graves form an informal group. A Screen Wall bears the names of those casualties from both wars buried in the cemetery whose graves could not be individually marked. The cemetery also contains a memorial erected by the Borough Council to the civilians of Willesden who lost their lives in enemy air raids.

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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Navigator Edward John Wood lost his life on the 26th February 1943 when his Handley Page Halifax II V9988 crashed on a night flying exercise. Taking off from RAF Riccall, the aircraft then lost an engine and crashed into trees north west of the airfield
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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden New Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the other side of the wall to this cemetery is the CWGC Willesden Jewish Cemetery. As cemeteries go, this is a pretty grand one, with a number of very impressive and overelaborate tombs and headstones.

There is a small CWGC World War One plot here
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CWGC Willesden Jewish Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden Jewish Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Driver Leslie Joseph Durlacher died at 7.45 pm on the 16th February 1919 at 1st Australian General Hospital, Sutton Veny, Wiltshire, England from broncho pneumonia.
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CWGC Willesden Jewish Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Gersh Breitman was born in Chechelnik, Pavlosh, Russia around 1896. He 19 years old and living in Sydney, NSW when he enlisted on the 27th August 1915 with the Australian Imperial Force.

While fighting in France, he was awarded the Military Medal – A.I.F. Orders 13th April, 1917.
Showed himself fearless and quick to act by rushing out from his post to assist 2nd Lieutenant Boileau who had
attacked four Germans in the open. By his prompt action he no doubt saved his officer‘s life and materially assisted
in the capture of the four enemy.

After surviving the war, he was admitted to the Military Hospital at Tidworth, Wiltshire on the 12th April 1919 with “Vincents Angina”. He died there at 8.50 am on the 19th April 1919 from tonsilitis, septicaemia & broncho pneumonia.
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CWGC Willesden Jewish Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The nearby CWGC World War Two plot is slightly larger. However, I was only able to photograph a few of the burials before I was informed by a cemetery ranger that I would need permission from the local council to take pictures. I assumed at first that this might be due to Jewish law that I’m unaware of, but he in fact wanted me to stop incase I sold the pictures to a magazine.

I explained my reasons and the research that I have done, but he wasn’t having any of it. There is a very impressive Jewish War Memorial near the CWGC plot which I went to have a look at, but as the ranger waited nearby to pounce on any move I made, it was pretty clear that I wasn’t welcome.

Of the hundreds of sites I have visited so far, this is the first time I have been asked to move on. Thankfully, on the previous occasions I have bumped into rangers, they have actively encouraged my work to tell the stories of the war dead buried in their churchyards and cemeteries.

I can’t see myself being in that part of London anytime soon, which irks me as I’m sure there are some great stories to be told from those who are buried there.

On the 21st May 1943, Avro Anson I DJ239 and Vickers Wellington HZ637 collided and crashed at Ellenborough Road and the nearby railway line, just east of Maryport, Cumberland. The crews of both aircraft were killed. The crew of Anson DJ239 were:

RCAF PO Macrae, A I Captain (Pilot)
RCAF Sgt M H Cornell, (Navigator)
RAF Sgt G B T Wymer (Navigator)
RAF Sgt T Green, (Wireless Air Gunner)
RAAF 421474 Sgt J T Sutherland, (Wireless Air Gunner)
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CWGC Willesden Jewish Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

During the afternoon of the 23rd April 1944, the crew of Handley Page Halifax V DK244 of 78 Squadron took off from RAF Breighton to undertake an air test. At 15.58hrs the aircraft entered a shallow dive and crashed just south of the village of Sutton upon Derwent. Sadly all but the rear gunner were killed in the crash, including Wireless Operator Leslie Israel.
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CWGC Willesden Jewish Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

During the afternoon of the 23rd April 1944, the crew of Handley Page Halifax III LV916 of 78 Squadron took off from RAF Breighton to undertake an air test. By 15.58hrs, the aircraft had not been in the air long when it entered a shallow dive and crashed just south of the village of Sutton upon Derwent. Sadly all but the rear gunner were killed in the crash, including Wireless Operator Leonard Shaiman.
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CWGC Willesden Jewish Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Willesden Jewish Cemetery - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

There are 69 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and 156 of the Second World War at CWGC Hendon Cemetery and Crematorium. Those whose graves are not marked by headstones are named on 2 Screen Wall memorials close the Cross of Sacrifice.

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CWGC Hendon Cemetery and Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hendon Cemetery and Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hendon Cemetery and Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hendon Cemetery and Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hendon Cemetery and Crematorium - Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

During the Second World War, many of the Middlesex hospitals, including that at Mill Hill, became Stationary Military Hospitals. The CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery contains 53 Second World War Commonwealth war graves, mostly situated in the war graves plot in section C.

This cemetery also contains The Netherlands Field of Honour, established in 1965. The plot contains the graves of more than 250 servicemen of the Netherlands, many of them having been brought to the cemetery from other United Kingdom burials grounds. The majority of the graves are those of Merchant seamen.

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Born in Marylebone, Owen Tudor Boyd was educated at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst. On the 20th January 1909, he was commissioned on the 'unattached list for the Indian Army' and attached to a British Army regiment in India before being appointed to the Indian Army in March 1910. He was posted to the Indian Army's 5th Cavalry and promoted Lieutenant on the 20 April 1911.

He was promoted temporary Captain Indian Army. From the 25th April 1916, he saw service in the First World War as a flying officer with the Royal Flying Corps. Later in 1916, he was a pilot on the Western Front with No. 27 Squadron and on the 9th July, promoted to flight commander. He was awarded the Military Cross in the London Gazette of 18 August 1916.

More promotions followed and on the 1st May 1936, he was promoted to air commodore of No. 1 Group RAF. He was appointed director of personal services at the Air Ministry in December 1936.

In 1938, as an air vice marshal, he became commander-in-chief RAF Balloon Command. On the 1st December 1940, he was replaced by Air Marshal Sir Leslie Gossage at RAF Balloon Command and promoted to air marshal and appointed deputy to the air officer commanding-in-chief (AOC-in-C) Middle East.

On his way to Egypt, he was to stop in Malta. However, the aircraft in which he and his staff were passengers was forced down over enemy-controlled Sicily by a group of Italian fighter aircraft. There is some controversy over his capture as Boyd was indoctrinated into "Ultra" intelligence and the advantage gained from breaking some German codes, which led to fears he could reveal this secret. Secondly one history book refers to "the reported circumstance is a navigation error and consequent fuel shortage".

After destroying his confidential papers by setting his own aircraft on fire, Boyd became a prisoner of war. He spent much of the war in the Castle Vincigliata (Castello di Vincigliata) camp near Florence, Italy.

When Italy capitulated in September 1943, he and two British Army generals (Philip Neame and Richard O'Connor, both captured in North Africa in 1941), with help from the Italian resistance movement, escaped while being transferred from Vincigliata. After spending time in the Italian countryside and a failed rendezvous with a submarine, they arrived by boat at Termoli, then went on to Bari where they were welcomed as guests by General Sir Harold Alexander, commanding the Allied Armies fighting on the Italian Front, on the 21st December 1943. Their escape was led by a Lieutenant Colonel Pat Spooner, who had escaped once before and returned to German-controlled Italy.

Of all of RAF Bomber Command's wartime group commanders, he spent the shortest time in command of his appointed group. In late July 1944, he was divorced. Little more than a week later, on the 5th August, he died from a heart attack.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 1st July 1944, a V1 bomb fell on Colindale Hospital. Four WAAF's were killed as a result, including Dora Burriss and Joan Gwendoline Sayers.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 29th April 1943, No.24 Sqn Lockheed Hudson IIIA FH307 left RAF Hendon and was scheduled to land to RAF Portreath, to be refueled before making the flight to Gibraltar and onwards. However, weather conditions at Portreath were poor and it was decided that the aircraft should stage through RAF Chivenor instead.

On the approach to land, the aircraft stalled, entered a spin and crashed. All of the crew on board were killed.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator Arthur George Hudd was killed on the 30th October 1942 when his Lockheed Hudson III, V8983 of No 24 Sqn, flew into a wooded hillside after descending to establish its position.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

The de Havilland DH.95 Flamingo was a twin-engined high-wing monoplane airliner first flown on the 22nd December 1938. During the Second World War some were used by the Royal Air Force as a transport and general communications duties.

There was also a the transport variant of the Flamingo, called the Hertfordshire. Only one was ever built. de Havilland Hertfordshire R2510 crashed on the edge of the RAF Hendon on the 23rd October 1940, killing all but one on board. The survivor was Leonard Ernest Charles Blake, but he succumbed to his injures around a month later on the 24th November 1940.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 12th March 1940, Pilot Albert Charles Manaton was on board Avro Anson I N9824 on a training flight from RAF North Luffenham when it crashed near Swindon, killing him and his four crew members.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Auxiliary Fireman Reginald Bruce Wakeman died as a result of injuries he sustained by enemy action at Chelsea Fire Station on the 17th April 1941.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 16th / 17th April 1941, one of the heaviest attacks was made on London since the war began. Bombing commenced shortly after 21:00hrs and lasted until nearly dawn.

ARP Warden Amelia Schroeder Groom was killed when bombs fell at Pembridge Mansions, Moscow Road, London.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 10th May 1941 a bomb landed on a block of flats in Clifton Gardens, followed by a number of smaller incendiary bombs, and the whole four storey building caught fire. The first fire crew to arrive on the scene were inside the building when the top floor collapsed and three of the crew were killed instantly, including Arthur Teague, another two being badly wounded.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Cornelis van Rietbergen survived the torpedoing of his ship Amstelland in July 1940, but died of wounds aboard HMS Vanquisher after this ship was bombed by a German aircraft on the 28th February 1941.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 13th June 1942, 2nd Lietenat Dirk Jacobus Klink took off from RAF Ibsley, Hampshire, in Supermarine Spitfire Vb R7334 on a training flight. He lost control of the aircraft and was seen coming out of the cloud at 1,000ft and hit the ground in a vertical dive. He was instantly killed on what was his 30th birthday.
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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Mill Hill Cemetery- Greater London, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

From September 1939, Hatfield House, which belongs to the Marquis of Salisbury, was used as a military hospital. A small section of the park was enclosed and laid out as a cemetery for burials from this hospital, which was in use throughout the war.

CWGC Hatfield Park War Cemetery contains 20 graves from the Second World War, together with the grave of a civilian airman. In addition, a special memorial headstone commemorates one casualty buried in the redundant churchyard of Digswell (St. John), Welwyn Garden City, whose grave could no longer be maintained.

It’s probably one of the trickiest locations to get to that I have visited so far. It can only be accessed on foot from a small footpath leading to the busy Great North Road. So it required dumping the car in Hatfield and walking to the site, but it was well worth. After visiting the busy cemeteries in London, it was nice to end the days trip in this quiet cemetery in a small corner of the park.

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CWGC Hatfield Park War Cemetery- Hertfordshire, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hatfield Park War Cemetery- Hertfordshire, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Squadron Leader Wilfred Henry Broom died in a road traffic accident on the 12th May 1944. His motor car collided with an army vehicle on the Barnett by-pass. 2 civilians were also killed in the crash.
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CWGC Hatfield Park War Cemetery- Hertfordshire, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hatfield Park War Cemetery- Hertfordshire, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

On the 23rd August 1943, de Havilland Mosquito VI HX849 collided with Mosquito VI HX850 while on air test flying low in cloudy weather between Hatfield and Salisbury Hall.

The aircraft disintegrated in the air, killing both of the two man crews. Observer John H. F. Scrope was in HX850, being flown by John de Havilland.
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CWGC Hatfield Park War Cemetery- Hertfordshire, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hatfield Park War Cemetery- Hertfordshire, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

Wireless Operator / Air Gunner John Stewart Brownsell was killed on the 16th January 1942 when his Lockheed Hudson III V9097 of No 500 Sqn flew into high ground near North Walsham, Norfolk, at night.
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CWGC Hatfield Park War Cemetery- Hertfordshire, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

U/T Pilot Kenneth Anderson Knudson was killed whilst flying in de Havilland Tiger Moth II, N6486 of No 1 EFTS, when it collided with Airspeed Oxford, P1967 of No 14 SFTS near Barton-in-the-Clay, Bedfordshire, on the 8th October 1941.
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CWGC Hatfield Park War Cemetery- Hertfordshire, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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CWGC Hatfield Park War Cemetery- Hertfordshire, Sunday 25th October 2020 by Chris Day, on Flickr

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