A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

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TonyC
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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by TonyC »

Spiffing update dear boy, up to your usual standards :clap: and as for the puddle, surely that's just '168 marking her spot!

I know that it's a replica but what's the history on the '109, does it contain any genuine '109 parts?

P.S
Yes, I know, stop calling you 'Shirley"... :grin:
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Blue_2
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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by Blue_2 »

As I understand, the 109 is almost entirely a replica. Tyres might be genuine. Certainly looks the part though!
TT, I had a tin of solvent cleaner which shifted the goo nicely. At least with a canopy cover I'll not need to speed tape it again...
It's been a busy weekend, 2 different YAM events in 2 days. I have photos from both, plus Halifax evening shots which I'll share on here when I've chance. Right now I'm back at work for a rest!
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hunterxf382
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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by hunterxf382 »

Blue_2 wrote:
Mon 09 May 2022, 6:46 am
As I understand, the 109 is almost entirely a replica. Tyres might be genuine. Certainly looks the part though!
An interesting Replica - on the BAPC register as BAPC.240 by the way:

https://aviationheritageuk.org/selected ... tryID=4240
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TonyC
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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by TonyC »

I remember walking into the hanger for the first time in 2001 and seeing the '109, under the nose of the Halifax, if my memory is correct, and being shocked to see it, as I wasn't aware that it existed!

It certainly looked the real thing then, although don't recall the tulip nose markings.

Seem to remember that there was also a Barnes Wallis Hall (though that could be another museum, as the memory isn't what it.......errrrr :grin: ), on site but on the two occasions that I have been to YAM, it was not open but the Gunners Room more than made up for that!
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Blue_2
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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by Blue_2 »

Tony, I think it was repainted at some point into the colour scheme of one of the Eastern Front aces (Hermann Graf rings a bell...?) a number of years ago. I vaguely recall it in a different scheme. It certainly looks the part.
There is an exhibition about Barnes Wallis, including the (in)famous catapult he used to test his Upkeep theories!

To this weekend just gone. I'm not going to call it an update, as no engineering work happened. Today's offering is more of a photographic round-up of what was a very busy weekend of events at YAM. If you get bored of photos of mainly Meteor F.8's and Halifax III's, look away now...!
Saturday was arguably for us the more relaxed day of the weekend, as it was the "We'll Meet Again" 1940's event. As the Meteor F.8 entered service in December 1949, we just about qualify! We had already decided that we would make a bit of a thing of her, seeing as she was parked out ready for the following day, so I brought my 'talking hat' and some other stuff from my own collection, borrowed a period life jacket off our Heritage manager Gary, fetched out some of our original manuals, period tools, and a toolbox, and put out a bit of a period display with 168. First though, we had to finish prepping the jet. After I had left on the Thursday, I then remembered we had a set of intake/jetpipe covers which would look better than the tinned-over intakes, so I dug them out of our stores then Scott and I fitted them. I then 'borrowed' the parachute pack and seat cushion out of 788 to fit the cockpit out, chucked our bare Mk.1 bone dome in, and that was us ready for visitors!
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We had a fairly brisk morning, with many interested visitors. Just after lunch YAM's young ambassador Oliver came to pay us a visit. He and his family are great supporters of the Meteor project, so we always like to make a fuss of him!
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It's the young ones whose imaginations we need to capture, otherwise who is going to do the work we do in the future....? The afternoon was equally busy, especially as the sun grudgingly put in an appearance. Towards the end of the day, we packed away all the display around the jet except the covers, mainly because I like them, wheeled the trolley acc back into the hangar (my cunning plan of leaving it out for Mother Nature to wash for me had worked!), and set up the sets of steps for Sunday's Open Cockpit event
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Much less photogenic, but far better for access. Then, a little treat. We had been invited back to the Nimrod camp on site that evening, to partake in a little supper. This led to the opportunity to join in on a very small private evening/sunset shoot of the Halifax outdoors a couple of friends had arranged...
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Given how little time she spends outside, I wasn't passing that opportunity up!
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The Nimrod had some great light on her too as the sun went down
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As it got a bit darker, I grabbed a couple more shots of the Halifax in her 'natural environment'
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Under a "Bomber's Moon"
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Quite a special bit of time spent, in good company, with what I always say is the jewel in YAM's crown. Thanks to the chaps involved (you know who you are) for the opportunity, and the laughs!
The next day, we knew, was D-day. Open Cockpit Day. This is only the second time YAM has run such an event, the first time being pre-COVID and basically being run along the lines of a 'queue and hope' free for all. While this worked, we did still have queues at some of the aircraft at closing time, leading to disgruntled customers who missed out. This time the office tried a different tack. The morning was given over to people who had pre-booked timed slots in specific aircraft, then an hour's lunch break for us to get our breath back, then the afternoon was a 'first come first served' session. I'm very happy to say the Meteor was fully booked! My team for the day was one of our guides Roger, Kane, and myself. We set up a "show and tell" table next to the jet so Roger could entertain our waiting visitors. Here he is having a quick look in the office before the hordes descend!
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As we opened, the coast guard popped in attempting a novel way to queue jump!
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The morning went pretty much as planned, and by the time we shut for the lunch break at 1 we were a tired but happy crew ready for a cup of tea, having sent on their way a stream of happy pre-booked customers.
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In the afternoon, we had a constant queue of visitors to the Meteor, all wanting to learn about Britian's first jet fighter. I have to say, the vast majority were very well behaved, following our instructions on the correct way to get in and out of the jet perfectly, respecting the fact that she's an old lady, and enjoying the experience of a 1950's front line fighter. There was literally only one slightly 'over excited' child; he was soon educated that attacking every single switch in the cockpit with small child ferocity, or trying to pull the crash pad off the gunsight, is not appreciated!
After a busy afternoon, our queue finally diminished and we could get the jet put to bed. All of a sudden, without the hive of activity of the last 2 days of people and equipment round her, she looked rather small and lonely sat at the end of the taxiway in the late afternoon sun!
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She'd done us proud though. Not looking small and lonely was the Halifax, I think finally enjoying some peace and quiet
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Then of course, there's good old 788. She's been very much the bridesmaid over the last month as my efforts have focussed on having 168 ready for last weekend...
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...but when we are back in she'll be back centre stage. Certain assemblies will be leaving the hangar on our next visit, assuming we have the summer weather available to take advantage of...
In other news, I acquired a very appropriate sticker for our toolchest in the week
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I'm sure everyone on here knows of the Vintage Pair, and the sad story of why they are no longer with us. Not everyone will know the link to our project though. For a while they were based at and administered from RAF Leeming, where 788 was on the gate. Spares for Meteors were getting to be in short supply, so poor old 788 was "visited" a number of times for parts. One of the reasons we have had to source so many items which the poor old girl was missing when we started on this project was so airshow goers of the early-mid 80's could continue to enjoy seeing the VP's Meteor T.7 in the air!

So, a huge thanks to Scott, Roger and Kane for their help to make this weekend work. More next time folks.
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TEXANTOMCAT
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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by TEXANTOMCAT »

Triffic update fella, the photos of the Halifax are superb- you should ping them into the usual Mags, am sure they would pay for the contribution and add to the Jaffa fund. We might have a spare Frankenstein (sic) life jacket for you if I can find it

ATB

TT

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Blue_2
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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by Blue_2 »

Someone rather well known from one of the mags was there TT, so I best not! :wink:
A life jacket of our very own would certainly be very welcome old chap, cheers.
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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by K5054NZ »

Thanks so much for sharing those lovely photos Graham! I love the little diorama around the F.8 - simple but effective.

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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by Blue_2 »

Cheers Zac!
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JonMann
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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by JonMann »

Was at Tangmere today, where a Meteor was on the back of a low loader. When I asked where it was off to, was told it was going to Elvington. Are you receiving another project to work on?

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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by Blue_2 »

All will be revealed presently... :wink:

Ps. And no, she's not going to be a parts donor, don't worry! She is safe.
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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by TonyC »

An update up to your usual standards and I simply love the (shhh, don't tell the other airframes this) Nimrod shot, superb and not in a Skoda way :smiley:
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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by Blue_2 »

I did get a couple of nice shots of the Nimrod, and some of her near neighbours. One of the perks of doing what we do!
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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by Dr_Q »

Given Foxy Dave's travels this weekend, can we assume/hope that Snoopy is well locked up or hidden?
2019
Daks Over Dux
Flying Legends
RIAT (Mach 3)
Wings over Houston

er, that's about it this year I reckon.

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Blue_2
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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by Blue_2 »

Right now, Snoopy couldn't be safer! :wink:

There'll be an update for our non-Facebook followers presently. Just so they know what we're on about!
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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

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Not an update, and certainly very little in the way of Meteor content. There is however a lot of Shackleton, Dakota and Vulcan, a fair bit of "proper" camera waving for what seems the first time in ages, plus some inter-team rivalry and banter. It might be that you consider it worth pulling up a chair, getting the kettle boiling and grabbing a Jaffa Cake or 3 for though, dear reader...

What We Did On Our Holidays, Or "Foxy Dave Gets His Wings"...

So, I assume a few of our regular readers of the non-facebook variety will be wondering what Dr_Q was alluding to regarding Foxy Dave's recent exploits. You may recall way back in the mists of time Kelvin of the Buccaneer XV168 team acquired a fox toy as a mascot, in honour of XV168's service with 12 Squadron. In the time honoured tradition of mascots, he has been a bit of a bone of contention, more than once suffering abduction and, er, 'relocating' at the hands of both the Meteor team and the Nimrod XV250 team. Last Sunday, Kelvin left Foxy Dave unattended in the hangar for a few seconds. Bad move. He didn't check if I was in the area either. Worse move. Given that the pesky reynard had already suffered at the hands of the Nimrod team on the Saturday, you'd think Kelvin would learn wouldn't you? Seems not. So said fox, with the aid of conspirators who shall remain unnamed, found his way into secure confinement. Then, over the course of the week, a cunning plan was hatched. My better half and I had a weekend away planned, a kind of busman's holiday if you like. Saturday we would be at Coventry, working on Shackleton WR963, and Sunday we had been invited to attend a Vulcan taxy run by our friends at Wellesbourne Mountford, keepers of Vulcan XM655. Well, it'd be rude to not take the fox on a road trip wouldn't it? We let Rich Woods in on our plan, and he suggested a plan to fettle the fox's naughty ways once and for all. Game raised by Team WR963. So, after an early start from Yorkshire, we found ourselves arriving at Coventry just in time to see Dakota G-AMPY taking off on a local flight. After traditional standard greetings, a few of which were almost not unfriendly, we headed out to the aircraft. I do like this "office"...
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I had been sent a C.G. calculator by the chaps at the Trenchard Museum at Halton. I finally remembered to bring it to its new home aboard '63!
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Then, we let the cat out of the bag. Or rather, the fox...
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He was blissfully unaware, until Rich approached him with a roll of masking tape in his hand. Then, let's just say Foxy Dave's day took a turn for the worse.
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Followed by some rather rapid turns for the worse...

He was last seen heading to the car to sulk and lick his wounds, as the Dak returned from its trip
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Yes, the rubble and diggers in the background are indicative of the fate of Coventry Airport, I'm afraid. WS788's birthplace's days are numbered... Anyway, I headed down to the fence line to watch AMPY taxy in
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I do love that post-war RAF Transport Command scheme. No idea why I had the theme music from the old TV series "Airline" in my head when I took the next shot!
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She was soon spun round and shut down
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I then found out we had just witnessed one of her last landings at Coventry, her home for decades, as she has been sold to a new owner in the US. She set off on the ferry flight to her next chapter of an already eventful life today.
We were then on to Shack jobs for the day. I'll not go into too much detail as Rich is planning a super-update over on the '63 thread imminently, but suffice to say we were kept busy in the baking sun
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Even squeezing in a second run of no.2 engine...

Before calling it a day
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My better half and I headed off to our overnight digs, a nice little pub in Wellesbourne village, for well earned showers, beer (or in her case gin), feed, and sleep.
The next morning we arrived at XM655MAPS' enclave at the airfield.
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The fox was with us, looking a sadder and wiser creature...
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The weather looked promising, initially...
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Though the clouds were gathering as the rear crew of XM597 "Black Buck 6" told us in their own words the story of the raid, and the subsequent diversion into Brazil after the fuel probe broke. They certainly wove an interesting, informative, gripping and entertaining tale!
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But then someone did a rain dance, and it absolutely chucked it down just before 655 was due to strut her stuff. We did the right thing and hid with 655's engineers! The rain then all but ceased, and the aircraft was readied and started
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All the control surfaces and systems, including as seen here the airbrakes, were exercised
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Before the running aircraft was towed out to the runway threshold. She's towed to avoid skittling the spectators, which she would at taxy power!
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Off she goes!
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It seemed all too soon the power came off and 655's nose was lifted to give some aerodynamic braking
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Before the jet turned round and backtracked, scaring the odd crow as she went
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Almost back, and sounding fantastic
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Before turning off the active onto the taxiway, and returning to us
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The Vulcan doesn't have a bad angle to be viewed from, but this must be among the best
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Especially as she's running, and hopefully sandblasting all those freeloaders on the road outside! The skies seemed to brighten a bit as the jet was parked and shut down
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After everything was shut down and made safe, we were allowed under the aircraft. Not every day you get to see a V-bomber with a belly full of bombs!
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An excellent event, well done and thank you to the 655 team. Leaving aside airframes preserved indoors in the national collections, this has to be the benchmark of how a V-bomber (or any large outdoor aircraft) should be looked after, the aircraft really is a credit to you.
It was also good to meet up with some familiar faces, one of whom Nick Beck brought that most traditional of gifts for aircraft restorers!
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Cheers Nick! Also thanks to the (frankly surprising) number of people who came up to us during the event to say hello and express their support and thanks for what we are doing with WS788, as well as the time and effort we put in to bringing you all along for the ride. Your support and feedback really does mean a lot to us! You all in the wider aviation community are a big reason we do what we do.
I said there was a tiny little bit of Meteor content for you; There was a stall at Wellesbourne selling, among other things, old photos. I scoured them for Meteor pics, finding a few of interest.
Exhibit A, a Netherlands Air Force F.8 at Soesterberg
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Exhibit B, an NF.14 of 85 Squadron
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And of local interest to me, Exhibit C, 3 Driffield based T.7's
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In front of the jets can be seen the East Yorkshire coast, curving away ahead of the windscreen of "J" can be seen the cliffs of Flambrough Head, and just out of the right of the shot, in front of the nose of "H", is where I am sat typing this post right now!
When we got back from our trip, I finally got round to putting an ebay win slide through the scanner
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This shows WS774, now preserved in Malta, parked at Tangmere in September 1960. Given the date I assume it is for the Battle of Britain At Home Day. The nose markings are certainly interesting!
Finally, to go back to Dr-Q's query about the whereabouts and wellbeing of Snoopy, he's in my front room, safe and well.
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I can't help but think the fact that he seems to be using my Avro Lincoln panel to practice the start procedures of heavy piston engined aircraft means Foxy Dave really ought to be worried though...

You'll probably be relieved to know, normal service, jaffa cake consumption, and WS788 spanner waving resumes this weekend. I hope you've enjoyed this slight detour from the usual content though; like I say we get to do some good stuff and it's nice to bring you all along to hopefully share the ride and the laughs!
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TEXANTOMCAT
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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by TEXANTOMCAT »

Excellent Jaffa tour and roundup chap - the Vulcan certainly looks superbly maintained, the bomb bay looks mint!

Look forward to the next Meteor Molestor Missive!

TT

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TonyC
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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by TonyC »

Thanks for that, the family now think that I'm slightly mad, as I burst out laughing (*) when Foxy departed and went flying :joy: although I do foresee some sort of revenge being enacted, at some stage in the future!

Apparently foxes never forget, or is that elephants? :smiley:

Great to see the Shack and the Vulcan, just need a Lancanster and we'd have a full house!




(*) I'm not known for laughing... :grinning:
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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by Archer »

Blue_2 wrote:
Tue 17 May 2022, 8:51 pm
Exhibit A, a Netherlands Air Force F.8 at Soesterberg
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A Meteor that is still around. It is outside at the Aviodrome museum, Lelystad, The Netherlands.
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DSC_0628_resize by Jelle Hieminga, on Flickr

History of the airframe, from https://avia-dejavu.net/photo%20I-187.htm (more photos at this link):
In March 1953, the Fokker built Gloster Meteor F.Mk.8 c/n 6466 was delivered at Soesterberg as '3W-50' to the 322 sqdn. of the L.S.K. Within a week the aircraft was damaged in a landing accident. The aircraft re-entered service in November 1953. The next incident with this airframe, re-serialed '3W-50', took place in May 1954. The canopy exploded in flight. In spite of the damage the aircraft landed safe. October 1956 the aircraft re-entered service as '7E-12' with the 327 squadron. Early 1957, the Meteor was moved to the 322 sqdn. as '3W-32'. On 28 May 1958, the airframe was phased out, but the Meteor survived as a monument at Soesterberg AFB. Since 1958, the Meteor was on static display first as 'I-187', but in 1981 the registration on the aircraft was changed to 'I-147'. Striking on the displayed aircraft is that it carries the red of the 327 squadron at the top of the tail and on the nose, although the last operator was 322 squadron that carries blue. After over forty years of open-air display at Soesterberg AFB the airframe was in bad condition with even the canopy missing. The I-147 page gives an idea of the condition of the 'I-147' when on display at Soesterberg AFB in September 1982.

Gloster Meteor F.8 ‘I-147’ arrived at Hoogeveen on 14 February 2006. The owner of the Meteor was ATN Aircraft Division a specialist in restoration of aircrafts. After the restoration of the aircraft, it should be displayed on a pile at Hoogeveen airfield. This plan did not go through: the aircraft was donated to Aviodrome. Early 2009, the Gloster Meteor was moved to Lelystad. Today, the aircraft is displayed in a much better condition by Aviodrome as 3W-32.

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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by Blue_2 »

Thanks chaps! Tony, sorry not sorry for making your nearest and dearest question your sanity!
Archer, thanks for that. I wondered/hoped she would be a survivor. Sounds like she's had a chequered history since that photo was taken, but it's good to know she's safe now.
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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by K5054NZ »

Absolutely terrific update Graham, thank you so much for taking the time to document and share your experiences for us all!

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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by TonyC »

Blue_2 wrote:
Thu 19 May 2022, 8:01 pm
Thanks chaps! Tony, sorry not sorry for making your nearest and dearest question your sanity!
Thanks! :smile: :smile:
...and pray that there's intelligent life somewhere up in Space cos there's bugger all down here on Earth!

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Blue_2
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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by Blue_2 »

Cheers Zac! We're all like minded on this forum, so I thought it'd only be right to share our travels...

Tony, unlucky...!
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Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by Blue_2 »

It's Wednesday folks, and we all know what that means don't we...?
Yes, I'm late with my update again. Apologies, but again work have got me run ragged this week. That, and getting a little something ready for cockpitfest at Newark...
Anyway, better late than never, 25/05/2022 Update!
It was another 2 days on the tools kinda weekend, and 788 is firmly back in our sights. Arrival on Saturday revealed that the outdoors jets had been put back into their current normal parking spots after the events of the other weekend, and the Halifax is safely back indoors.
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The good news is our tame Kiwi Monty is back off his holidays! He had been missed; I'm contractually obliged to say that as he brought us gifts! He also brought zaps from his home RNZAF units. And boy, has he got busy with them
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I think it's safe to say he's left his mark! He has now done his good work with the compass mount for the Chipmunk, so being an avionics man he offered to spend the rest of his time with us making inroads into resurrecting 788's butchered wiring. This is very much the best use of his time with us, so he started setting up his avionics bay. I had had a delivery during the week, one of our friends and supporters Mick had taken the steel nosewheel guard away a while ago as it had rotted. He called in a favour from a mate, and this week the guard returned to us good as new.
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Cheers Mick! So that's a thing to paint and fit over the weekend for starters. I cracked on with priming and painting the guard while Monty started to get his head into the books.
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While it was drying I then made a start on our next airframe job on 788. We have secured a brand new pair of flaps for 788, which will save us a lot of work restoring 788's examples. Obviously, this means her old flaps which haven't been removed since the 1960's have to come off, as I'm sure you can imagine the prospect of this filled me with joy...
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I started on the port side, for no particular reason at all. First job was undoing the rods to the hydraulic actuators, which as these had been on and off recently was pretty straightforward. And that's where 788's cooperation ended. The Good Book says remove the 2 clevis pins in the outer and inner hinges, remove the bolt in the central hinge, and simply remove. Well, that's a wonderful theory, we'll file that one firmly under "fiction" then... the clevis pins are stuck firmly in their hinges, the bolt is seized solid in the central hinge, access is crap... great. The "simply remove" theory might have been fine when the aircraft was maintained, but not decades later! Sooo... to Plan B. Remove the entire hinge units from the wing. 4 nuts and bolts each, the lower 2 of which on each hinge are obscured by the flap itself, so that'll be spanners a millionth of a turn at a time then; joy. Oh, and did I mention they are rusty...? I made a start on undoing the accessible nuts
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After getting so far, we decided a jaffa cake break to let it think about things was in order
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Of course, we take the safe transportation of jaffa cakes seriously!
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We were distracted by the sound of Merlin Magic overhead...
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After jaffa cakes and a brew, we got back on with 788. Monty continued scurrying in and out of holes in the jet, looking at wiring and making those teeth-sucking noises the MOT man makes when he looks under your car, and I carried on with the hideous contraption that is the flap. Close of play saw some success, the inboard hinge grudgingly unbolted
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And 3 of the 4 on the outboard hinge undone
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These are a particularly fun creature, as you have to get your hand in through that hole you can see, turn your hand left through another hole, then double back towards yourself with a spanner to get on to the other end of the bolt. At least reattaching the hinges should be a touch less difficult, as there won't be a hoofing great flap in the way! Then there's the centre hinge bolts. You can see them...
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...but you can't do bugger all with them! Especially that lower right one with the helpfully rotted-away head...
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When this is the hardware you are battling with, you can see it's "challenging"...
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We finally called it a day and packed up, more than slightly frustrated at 788's stubbornness and the butchery skills of the chaps responsible for chopping her wiring all those decades ago. But positive of the day, one of our long term followers brought us a pressie...
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Cheers for that Philip!
On to Sunday, and that Bad Man Monty had been busy with the zaps again!
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Scott and Monty were in, Monty was setting up his Avionics Bay...
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So as this looked far too much like professional clever stuff for our tastes Scott and I decided it was about time some of the jet tasted our new paint stripper. We removed the engine doors (Monty wanted these off anyway so he could do more sucking his teeth and shaking his head) and took them outside to meet some chemicals. More on that later...
Kelvin then appeared, and was overjoyed to be reunited with Foxy Dave. Once he had retrieved him from his lofty perch that is!
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When I broke this news on our Facebook page, my good friend and co-conspirator on Operation "Foxy Dave Gets His Wings" Rich Woods wrote and posted a poem on there celebrating the infamous event which I hope he doesn't mind me sharing here, but I thought it really is too good not to share!

I shot a fox into the air,
It fell to earth, and I found where.
For, so swiftly though he flew, my sight
Followed where flung by Griffon might.

It breathed a song into the air,
Turned six blades, the fox, unaware:
Departed from propeller, so long,
On a parabolic flightpath true and strong.

Long, long after, through exhaust smoke
I found the fox, his spirit broke.
The story from beginning to end,
Beware the Shackleton, furry friend...


Top work Rich! Anyway our work continued. Monty hard at work learning the Meteor Electric Spaghetti In the Meteor WS788 Avionics Bay...
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It has a sign...
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...so that must mean it's official. And a zap, inevitably... I got the now dry guard fitted to 788's nose leg...
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...and damn good it looks too!
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Then back to offering the flap new and interesting opportunities to be a complete pain in the you-know-where.
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Some minor progress later, guess what happened......?
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Yes, under threat of mutiny by my team, more jaffa cakes and tea were consumed. Which fortified us for the battle ahead with this. Yes, that is a nut, yes, it does have to come out, no, it doesn't want to, yes, I can only turn the spanner a fraction of a turn at a time, and finally yes the flap is completely and utterly in the way. Poking the phone into the gap and taking photos like this...
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...is literally the only way to see if I was making any progress. There is no angle to get your head in there and get 'eyes on' on the thing. As you can see though, the nut is undoing, albeit slowly and grudgingly. Getting the flaps off also means we have access to sort corrosion like this...
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...also revealed by the "are-we-actually-getting-anywhere" cam. But, just before knocking off time, and after setting what may be a record for number of tools jammed almost irretrievably in a Meteor wing....
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We'd only bl00dy well gone and done it! Of course, the resulting euphoria was tempered by the knowledge we've got it all to do again on the other side...
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...but it's another battle won. Good thing we retrieved all the tools out of that wing, as we'll be needing them next time... Before we packed away, we cleaned off the engine doors after their day enjoying some paint stripper. It has certainly got it's work cut out as these doors have never before been stripped all the way back it seems
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That patchwork look is cased by the layers upon layers of paint on these doors, which as you can see from these 2 pictures goes all the way down through many layers of different gate guard camouflages, to the 1ANS silver, then down through at least another couple of layers of camouflages before finally hitting the factory primer, and then bare metal...
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It really is Time Team in minature. All of 788's history is right there to see.
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So the doors were stowed away until their next liasion with the stripper round the back of the hangar (oo err...), and everything else was tidied away at the close of a tiring, frustrating, but ultimately rewarding weekend's work
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Until next time folks...
Meteor WS788/ Chippy WK640 Restoration Project, YAM
Shack WR963, Coventry
Other types meddled with by request!

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TonyC
Posts: 170
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Location: Lost, if you find me, please let me know...

Re: A-W Meteor NF.14 WS788 Restoration Project

Post by TonyC »

Right, a bloody silly question from an enthusiast with absolutely no engineering understanding!

Wouldn't access be easier, if the wing skin above the flap was removed?

I understand that this would involving lots of drilling and re-rivitting but possibly also aid corrosion preventation?

Said it was a silly question :grin:

I also trust that Montys' mode of transport will be suitable 'zapped', in return?

Great update as always!
...and pray that there's intelligent life somewhere up in Space cos there's bugger all down here on Earth!

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